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Title: An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language
       in which the words are explained in their different senses, ...

Author: John Jamieson

Release Date: August 18, 2012 [EBook #40521]

Language: English

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INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This dictionary is an abridged edition of the two-volume quarto dictionary published in 1808. Numerous entries are prefixed by an asterisk, for which no explanation is given. According to the four-volume edition published in 1879-1882, "The asterisk signifies that the word to which it is prefixed, besides the common meaning in English, is used in a different sense in Scotland."

Some entries are alphabetically out of sequence.

Some entries are undefined. A full list is included in the Transcriber's Notes at the end.

Some cross-references have spellings at variance with the word referred to. This reflects the fluidity of the spelling of Scottish words at the time the dictionary was compiled. Where the reference is clearly correct, a link has been made.

A number of words for which a cross-reference is cited do not in fact appear in the dictionary. These are indicated by the colour green. A full list is included in the Transcriber's Notes.

An alphabetical Table of Contents has been added in order to facilitate consultation of the dictionary.


AN

ETYMOLOGICAL

DICTIONARY

OF THE

SCOTTISH LANGUAGE.





AN

ETYMOLOGICAL

DICTIONARY

OF THE
SCOTTISH LANGUAGE
IN WHICH

THE WORDS ARE EXPLAINED IN THEIR DIFFERENT SENSES,
AUTHORISED BY THE NAMES OF THE WRITERS BY WHOM THEY ARE USED,
OR THE TITLES OF THE WORKS IN WHICH THEY OCCUR,

AND

DEDUCED FROM THEIR ORIGINALS.


ABRIDGED FROM THE QUARTO EDITION,

BY THE AUTHOR,

JOHN JAMIESON, D. D.

FELLOW OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH,
OF THE SOCIETY OF THE ANTIQUARIES OF SCOTLAND, AND OF THE
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY.


EDINBURGH:

PRINTED FOR ARCHIBALD CONSTABLE AND COMPANY, AND
ALEXANDER JAMESON, EDINBURGH,

By Abernethy & Walker.
1818.


CONTENTS

Preface

An Explanation of the Contractions used in this Work

Rules for Rendering the use of the Dictionary more easy

A       B      C       D       E      
F                G                H                I, J, Y vowel
K L M N O
P Q R S T
U, V W Y consonant


Transcriber's Notes


PREFACE.

The Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, which was published in the year 1808, has been so favourably received, that although the impression was large, a set is now rarely to be found; and at any rate cannot be purchased at less than double the price paid by Subscribers.

As many, who would wish to possess the original work, cannot now be supplied; while it has still been out of the reach of others, not less interested in our national literature; the Author has been advised to give it to the Public in an abridged form.

He has followed the same plan with that of the abridgment of Dr Johnson's English Dictionary; in giving all the terms contained in the larger work, in their various significations, the names of the writers [vi] by whom they are used, or the titles of the works in which they occur, and their derivations. In one instance only has he deviated from the plan of the great English Lexicographer, in placing the etymons after the definitions. This mode is undoubtedly the most simple; as a reader, when looking into a Dictionary for the origin of a word with which he is familiar, or for the signification of one with which he is unacquainted, must be supposed to turn his eye first to the definition, that he may know whether this is the word that he looks for, or whether, in the passage in which it has occurred, it can bear the sense there given, before he thinks of examining its origin, or can form any judgment as to the propriety of the etymon that may be offered.

While this work contains a variety of words which are not to be found in the quarto edition, the Author flatters himself that he does not claim too much in supposing, that during ten years which have elapsed since it was published, he has had it in his power, from many sources formerly unexplored, to make considerable improvements both in the explanatory and in the etymological department. This, he trusts, will be evident to any who will take the trouble to compare the one work with the other.

In most instances, where he has met with new significations of the words explained in the larger work, he has inserted them in this, with their authorities. Such, indeed, is the copiousness of our vernacular language, [vii] that he is far from pretending that he has had it in his power to give a complete view of it. From the recent publication of many of our old acts formerly imprinted, from his own researches, and from the liberal communications both of friends and strangers, who have been anxious to render what they are pleased to consider a national work as complete as possible, the Author has been supplied with a great variety of terms which were formerly unknown to him. These he hopes to have it soon in his power to give to the public in an additional volume in quarto, in order to complete the former work. This, as far as he can calculate at present, will be equal in size to any of the preceding volumes.

Edinburgh,  
May 6. 1818.


[ix]

An Explanation of the Contractions used in this Work.

A. Bor. Anglia Borealis, North of England.
Adj. Adjective.
Adv. Adverb.
Alem. Alemannic language.
Ang. Angus, county of.
Arm. Armorican, or language of Bretagne.
A. S. Anglo-Saxon language.
Belg. Belgic language.
C.B. Cambro-Britannic, or Welsh language.
Celt. Celtic.
Clydes. Clydesdale.
Conj. Conjunction.
Contr. Contracted, or Contraction.
Corn. Cornish, or language of Cornwall.
Corr. Corrupted, or corruption.
Dan. Danish language.
Dimin. Diminutive.
Dumfr. Dumfriesshire.
E. English language.
Fr. French language.
Franc. Frankish, Theotisc, or Tudesque language.
Fris. Frisian dialect of the Belgic.
Gael. Gaelic of the Highlands of Scotland.
Germ. German language.
Gl. Gloss. Glossary.
Gl. Sibb. Glossary by Mr James Sibbald.
Gr. Greek language.
Heb. Hebrew language.
Hisp. Spanish language.
Ibid. In the same place.
Id. Having the same signification; also, the same writer.
Imper. Imperative.
Ir. Irish language.
Isl. Islandic (or Icelandic) language.
Ital. Italian language.
Lat. Latin language.
L. B. Barbarous Latin.
Loth. Lothian.
Metaph. Metaphor, Metaphorical.
Moes. G. Moeso-Gothic, as preserved in Ulphilas's Version of the Gospels.
Mod. Modern.
MS. Manuscript.
N. Note.
O. Old.
Orkn. Orkney.
Part. pr. Participle present.
—— pa. —— past.
Pers. Persian language.
Perh. Perhaps.
Pl. Plural.
Prep. Preposition.
Pret. Preterite.
Pron. Pronoun; also, Pronounce, pronunciation.
Prov. Proverb.
Q. or q. Quasi.
q. v. Quod vide.
S. Scottish, Scotland.
S. Denotes that a word is still used in Scotland.
S. A. Scotia Australis, south of Scotland.
S. B. Scotia Borealis, North of Scotland; also Northern Scots.
Shetl. Shetland.
Shirr. Shirrefs.
S. O. Scotia Occidentalis, West of Scotland.
s. Substantive.
Su. G. Suio-Gothic, or ancient language of Sweden.
Sw. Swedish language, (modern.)
Term. Termination.
Teut. Teutonic.
Tweedd. Tweeddale.
V. Vide, see.
v. Verb.
vo. Voce.


[x]

Rules for rendering the use of this Dictionary more easy.

Y vowel, used by our ancient writers promiscuously with i, being in fact only double i, and printed ij in other northern languages, is to be sought for, not as it stands in the English alphabet, but in the same place with the letter i, throughout the work.

Words not found in SH, to be sought for under SCH.

Those, in like manner, not found in WH, to be sought for under QUH, expressing the sound of the old Gothic guttural.

Words, improperly printed in our old books with Z, to be looked for under Y consonant.



In One Volume 8vo, price 12s.

HERMES SCYTHICUS,

OR
THE RADICAL AFFINITIES

OF THE

GREEK AND LATIN LANGUAGES

TO

THE GOTHIC.

Illustrated from the Moeso-Gothic, Anglo-Saxon, Francic,
Alemannic, Suio-Gothic, Islandic, &c.
TO WHICH IS PREFIXED,
A DISSERTATION ON THE HISTORICAL PROOFS OF THE
SCYTHIAN ORIGIN OF THE GREEKS.
⁂ A few copies have been printed in royal 8vo, price 24s.


"Dr Jamieson, being amply provided with an accurate knowledge of the various dialects of the Gothic Languages to be compared with the Greek, has proved the existence of a connection between them, more extensive and more intimate than could easily have been imagined, without so laborious an investigation, in which he appears to have gone considerably further than his learned and ingenious predecessors Ihre and Rudbeck."

Quarterly Review, No. XXVII, Oct. 1815.



AN

ETYMOLOGICAL

DICTIONARY

OF THE

SCOTTISH LANGUAGE.



A

The letter A has, in the Scottish language, four different sounds:

1. A broad, as in E. all, wall. U is often added, as in cald, cold, written also cauld; and sometimes w; both as marks of the prolongation of the sound.

2. A short, in lak, mak, tak, S. as in last, past, E.

3. A open, in dad, daddie, a father, and some other words, S. as in E. read pret., ready adj.

4. A slender or close, in lane, alane, alone, mane, moan, S. like face, place, E. The monosyllables have generally, although not always, a final e quiescent.

A is used in many words instead of o in E.; as ane, bane, lang, sang, stane, for one, bone, long, song, stone. For the Scots preserve nearly the same orthography with the Anglo-Saxons, which the English have abandoned. Thus the words last mentioned were written in A. S. an, ban, lang, sang, stan. In some of the northern counties, as in Angus and Mearns, the sound of ee or ei prevails, instead of ai, in various words of this formation. Ane, bane, stane, &c. are pronounced ein, bein, stein, after the manner of the Germans, who use each of these terms in the same sense.

When this letter is written with an apostrophe, as a', it is meant to intimate that the double l is cut off, according to the pronunciation of Scotland. But this is merely of modern use.

A is sometimes prefixed to words, both in S. and old E., where it makes no alteration of the sense; as abade, delay, which has precisely the same meaning with bade. This seems to have been borrowed from the A.S., in which language abidan and bidan are perfectly synonymous, both simply signifying, to remain, to tarry.

A, in composition, sometimes signifies on; as agrufe, on the grufe or belly, S.; Isl. a grufu, cernuè, pronè. Johnson thinks that a, in the composition of such E. words as aside, afoot, asleep, is sometimes contracted from at. But these terms are unquestionably equivalent to on side, on foot, on sleep; on being used, in the room of a, by ancient writers.

A is used, by our oldest writers, in the sense of one. The signification is more forcible than that of the indefinite article in English; for it denotes, not merely an individual, where there may be many, or one in particular, but one exclusively of others, in the same sense in which ae is vulgarly used.

ABAD, ABADE, ABAID, s. Delay, abiding, tarrying; the same with Bad, Bade.

A. S. abid-an, manere.

Wallace.

ABAID, part. pa. Waited, expected.

A. S. abad, expectatus.

Douglas.

To ABAY, ABAW, v. a. To astonish. Abayd, part. pa. astonished; abawed, Chaucer.

Fr. esbah-ir, id.

K. Hart.

To ABAYS, v. a. To abash, to confound. Abaysyd, part. pa.
Wyntown.

Fr. abass-ir, id.

ABAITMENT, s. Diversion, sport.
Douglas.

Arm. ebat-a ludere, ebat ludus; O. Fr. ebaud-ir recreare, ebattement recreatio.

ABAK, adv. Back, behind; Chaucer, id.
Douglas.

Isl. aabak, retrorsum, A. S. on baec, id.

ABANDOUN. In abandoun, at abandoun, at random.
Barbour.
Chaucer uses bandon as denoting free will, pleasure.

Fr. en ábandon, à l'ábandon, id. from à, ban, and donner, to give up to interdiction.

To ABANDON, v. a.
 1. To bring under absolute subjection.
Barbour.
 2. To let loose, to give permission to act at pleasure.
Wallace.
 3. To destroy, to cut off.
Wallace.

Fr. abandonn-er, id.

ABANDONLY, adv. At random, without regard to danger.
Wallace.

ABASIT, part. pa. Confounded, abashed.
Douglas.

ABATE, s. Accident; something that surprises one, as being unexpected.
King's Quair.

Fr. abatt-re, to daunt, to overthrow; or abet-ir, stupidum, hebet-em, reddere.

To ABAW.
V. Abay.

ABBEIT, s. Dress, apparel, O. E. abite.
Bannatyne Poems.

Arm. abyt, abyta, Lat. habit-us, Fr. habit, id.

ABBACY, ABBASY, s. An abbey.

L. B. abatia, id.

Acts. Ja. III.

ABBOT OF UNREASON, a sort of histrionic character, anciently exhibited in Scotland, but afterwards forbidden by Act of Parliament.
Acts Marie.

This was one of the Christmas sports; and, as the ancient Saturnalia levelled all distinction of ranks, the design of this amusement was to ridicule the solemnity of the proceedings of an Abbot, or other dignified clergyman. It is the same with the Abbot of Misrule, and distinguished in name only from the Boy-Bishop, characters formerly well known both in England and in France. The principal personage was denominated the Abbot of Unreason, because his actings were inconsistent with reason, and merely meant to excite mirth.

ABEE. To let abee. To let alone, to bear with, not to meddle with, S.

To let be, E.

Ritson.

ABEECH, ABIEGH, adv. Aloof, "at a shy distance," chiefly used in the west of S.
Stand abeigh, keep aloof.
Burns.

Fr. aboy, O. Fr. abai, abay, abbais; E. at bay, O. E. abay.

ABERAND, part. pr. Going astray.

Lat. aberrans, E. aberring.

Bellenden.

To ABHOR, v. a. To fill with horror.
Lyndsay.

To ABY, v. a. To suffer for.

O. E. abeye, abie. A. S. byg-an, to buy.

Henrysone.

ABIL, adj. Able.
Wyntown.

Lat. habil-is, Fr. habile, C. B. abl, Teut. abel, id.

ABIL, adv. Perhaps.
V. Able.

ABYLL, adj. Liable, apt.
V. Abil.
Bellenden.

ABITIS, s. pl. Obits, service for the dead.
Bannatyne Poems.

Lat. obit-us, death; also, office for the dead.

ABLACH, s. A dwarf, an expression of contempt, S. B.
Gl. Shirrefs.

Gael. abhach, id.

ABLE, ABLIS, ABLINS, adv. Perhaps, peradventure, S. Yeable-sea, id.
Montgomery.

A. S. abal, Isl. and Su. G. afl, strength, properly that of the body; afl-as, to be able.

ABLINS, adv.
V. Able.

ABOWYNE, ABONE, ABOW, prep. Above, S.  Yorks.  Westmorel.
Barbour.

A. S. abufan, id. The radical term is evidently ufan, supra.

To ABREDE, v. a. To publish, to spread abroad.
Gl. Sibb.

A. S. abraed-an, propalare.

To ABREDE, v. n. To start, to fly to a side. Chauc. abraide, id.
Henrysone.

ABREID, ABRADE, ABREAD, adv. Abroad, at large, S.
Burel.

A. S. abred-an, extendere, or Isl. a braut, forth, in via.

ABSTINENCE, s. A truce, cessation of arms.
Spotswood.

Fr. id. L. B. abstinentia.

AB-THANE, ABTHANE, s.
V. Thane.

ABULYEIT, ABULYEID, ABILYEIT, part. pa.
 1. Drest, apparelled.
Douglas.
 2. Equipped for the field of battle.
Acts Ja. II.

Fr. habill-er, to clothe.

ABULIEMENT, s. Dress, habit; Fr. habiliment.
Bellenden.

AC, EC, conj. But, and.
Barbour.

A. S. aec, eac; Moes. G. auk; Alem. auh; Su. G. och, ock; Belg. ook; Lat. ac, etiam.

ACCOMIE, s. A species of metal, S.
V. Alcomye.

To ACCORD. Used impersonally; as accords, or as accords of law, i. e. as is agreeable or conformable to law. It has greater latitude of signification than the phrase, as effeiris, which denotes any thing proportional, convenient, or becoming, as well as conformity.
Laws of S.

To ACHERSPYRE, v. n. To shoot, to germinate, E. acrospire.
Chalmerlan Air.

A. S. aechir, an ear of corn, aecer, Su. G. aakar, corn, and spira, the projection of any thing that is long and slender.  Gr. ακρος, summus, and σπειρα, spira.

ACHERSPIRE, s. The germination of malt at that end of the grain from which the stalk grows, S.

ACHIL, adj. Noble.
V. Athil.

To ACRES, ACRESCE, v. n.
 1. To increase, to gather strength.
Burel.
 2. Used us a law term in S. to denote that one species of right, or claim, flows from, and naturally falls to be added to, its principal.

Fr. accroist-re, Lat. accrescere, id.

To ACQUEIS, v. a. To acquire.
Burel.

Fr. acquis, acquise, part. pa.; Lat. acquisitus.

ACQUART, AIKWERT, adj. Cross, perverse, S.
Douglas.

A. S. acwerd, aversus, perversus, E. aukward.

ACTON, s. A leathern jacket, strongly stuffed, anciently worn under a coat of mail.
Stat. Rob. I.

O. Fr. auqueton, haucton, L. B. aketon, acton, id.

ACTUAL, adj. An actual minister, or an actual man, a phrase still used by the vulgar to denote one who is in full orders as a minister of the gospel, S.
Wodrow.

L. B. actus, officium, ministerium.

ADDETTIT, part. pa. Indebted.
Douglas.

Fr. endebté, id.

ADEW, used as an adj. Gone, departed.
Douglas.

From Fr. adieu, used in an oblique sense.

ADEW, part. pa. Done.
Wallace.

A. S. adoa facere, adon tollere.

ADHEILL, s. The district in S. now called Athol.
Barbour.

Gael. Blair-adh-oll, Blair-Atholl, expl. "the great pleasant plain."

ADDILL, ADDLE, s.
 1. Foul and putrid water.
Douglas.
 2. The urine of black cattle, Renfrews.

A. S. adl, filthy gore, Teut. adel, filth, mire.

Hence,

To ADDLE, v. n. To moisten the roots of plants with the urine of cattle, Renfrews.

Su. G. adl-a, mejere.

ADIST, prep. On this side, S. It is opposed to ayont, i. e. on the other side.
Kelly.

Perhaps from Germ. diss. hoc, E. this.

To ADORNE, v. a. To worship, to adore.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

ADRED, adv. Downright.
Douglas.

Fr. adroit, or droit, right, straight, Lat. direct-us, Rudd.

ADREICH, adv. Behind, at a distance.
To follow adreich, to follow at a considerable distance, S. B. Adrigh, O. E.

From the adj. Dreich, q. v.

Bellenden.

ADREID, conj. Lest.
Palice Hon.

Imper. of A. S. adraed-an timere.

ADRESLY, adv. With good address.
Wyntown.

AE, adj. One, S.
V. letter A.
Ramsay.

AE, adv. Always; E. aye.
Z. Boyd.

Isl. ae, semper, Moes. G. aiw aeternum.

AER, s. Oar.
V. Air.
Stat. Gild.

To AFAYND, v. a. To attempt, to endeavour, to try.
Wallace.

A. S. afand-ian tentare.

AFALD, AFAULD, AEFAULD, AUFAULD, EFFAULD, adj.
 1. Honest, upright, without duplicity, S.
 2. Used to denote the unity of the divine essence in a trinity of persons.
Barbour.

Moes. G. ainfalth, Isl. einfauld, A. S. anfeald, simplex.  Immediately from S. a or ae one, and fald fold.

AFF, adv. Off, S.
Ross.

Moes. G.  Isl.  Su. G.  Dan.  Belg. af, Gr. απο, αφ', Alem. and Lat. ab.

Aff at the knot, lunatic, deranged, S. B.
Gl. Shirrefs.
Aff and on.
 1. Applied to those who lodge on the same floor, S.
 2. Without any permanent change, used in relation to the sick, S.

Aff or on, determined one way or another, as in regard to a commercial transaction, S.

AFFCAST, s. A castaway.
Bruce.

From aff off, and cast.

AFFCOME, s.
 1. The termination of any business, the reception one meets with, as, "I had an ill affcome," S.
 2. Sometimes used in the sense of escape, S. q. "coming off."

AFFECTUOUS, adj. Affectionate.
V. Effectuous.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

AFFER, AFEIR, EFFEIR, EFFERE, s.
 1. Condition, state.
Barbour.
 2. Warlike preparation, equipment for war.
Wallace.
 3. Appearance, shew.
Barbour.
 4. Demeanour, deportment.
Maitland P.
V. Fair, Fere.

AFFERD, part. pa. Afraid, O. E. affered, vulgar E. afeard.
Douglas.

A. S. afaered, territus.

AFFERIS, EFFEIRS, v. impers.
 1. Becomes, belongs to, is proper or expedient; frequently used in our laws.
Barbour.
 2. It sometimes signifies what is proportional to, S.
Acts Counc.

O. Fr. affer-ir, appartenir, Lat. affero.

AFF-HAND, adj. Plain, honest, blunt, given to free speaking. S. affin-hand, Ang.

AFF-HAND, adv. Without premeditation, S.
Ramsay.

AFFLUFF, AFFLOOF, adv.
 1. Without book, off hand.
To repeat aff lufe, to deliver merely from memory, without having a book or notes, S.
 2. Extempore, without premeditation, S.
Ramsay.

From S. aff off, and lufe, the palm of the hand.

AFFPUT, s. Delay, or pretence for delaying. S.

AFFPUTTING, adj. Delaying, trifling, dilatory, putting off, S.

AFFRAY, s. Fear, terror; Chaucer, id.

Fr. affre, effroi, terreur.

Barbour.

AFFROITLIE, adv. Affrightedly.

Fr. effroy-er, to frighten.

Douglas.

AFFSET, s.
 1. Dismission, the act of putting away, S.
 2. An excuse, a pretence, S.
Ross.

Moes. G. afsat-jan, amovere.

AFFSIDE, s. The farther side of any object, S.

Su. G. afsides, seorsum.

AFLOCHT, AFLOUGHT, part. pa. Agitated, in a flutter, S.
V. Flocht.
Bellenden.

AFORGAYN, prep. Opposite to; the same with Foregainst, q. v.
Barbour.

A. S. onforan, ante, coram, and gean, contra; on being changed into ain S. and E., as onweg into away.  Foran ongean, ex adverso.

AFORNENS, prep. Opposite to.
V. Fore-anent.
Wyntown.

AFTEN, adv. Often, S.
Ramsay.

A. S. aeft, iterum.

AFTER ANE, adv. Alike, in the same manner, in one form, S.  i. e. after one.

AFTER-CLAP, s. Evil consequence, S.
Gl. Sibb.

AFTERHEND, adv. Afterwards.
V. Eftirhend.

AFTERINGS, AFT'RINS, s. pl. The last milk taken from a cow, S.  Lancash.  Derbysh. id.

A. S. aefter post.

Morison.

AGAYNE, AGANE, prep. Against, S.
Wyntown.

A. S. gean, agen, ongean, Su. G. gen, igen, Isl. gegn, gen, contra.

AGAIT, adv. On the way or road.
V. Gait.
Wallace.

A in the sense of on, and gait, a way.

AGATIS, adv. In one way, uniformly.
Barbour.

A, one, and gatis the plur. or genit. of A. S. gat, a way.

AGEE, A-JEE, adv.
 1. To one side, S.
To look agye, to look aside, Gl. Yorks.
Ramsay.
 2. A-jar, a little open, S.
Burns.

From a on, and jee, to move, to turn.

To AGENT, v. a. To manage, whether in a court of law, or by interest, S.
Baillie.

To AGGRISE, v. a. To affright, to fill with horror. Agryse, Chaucer, to shudder, to make to shudder.
Douglas.

A. S. agrys-an, horrere.

AGLEY, A-GLY, adv. Off the right line, obliquely, wrong, S.
Burns.
V. Gley.

AGRUFE, adv. In a flat or grovelling position, S.
V. Grufe.

AGWET, s. The name anciently given to the hill on which the castle of Edinburgh stands.
Hardyng.

Corr. from C. B. Agned, Castel mynyd Agned; perhaps, q. "the castle of the rifted mount," agen, signifying a cliff, ageniad, id. agenedig, rifted.

AHIND, AHINT, prep. Behind, S.
Buchan Poems.

A. S. hindan, post, aet hindan, a tergo, on-hinder, retrorsum.

AHIND, AHINT, adv.
 1. Behind, in respect of place, S.
 2. Late, as to time, S.
 3. Applied to what remains, or is left, S.
Ross.

AICH, s. Echo, S. B.

AIGARS, s. Grain dried very much in a pot, for being ground in a quern or hand-mill. S. B.

Moes. G. akran, Su. G. aker, Isl. akur, corn; A. S. aecer, an ear of corn.

Hence,

AIGAR-MEAL, s. Meal made of grain dried in this manner, S.

AIGAR-BROSE, s. A sort of pottage made of this meal, S.

To AIGH, v. a. To owe, to be indebted; aighand, owing, S. B.

Su. G. aeg-a, Isl. eig-a, debere; Moes. G. aig-an, A. S. ag-an, habere, possidere.

AIGHINS, s. pl. What is owing to one, especially used as denoting demerit. When one threatens to correct a child who is in fault, it is a common expression, "I'll gie you your aighins," S. B.

Moes. G. aigins, possession.

AIGLET, s.
 1. A tagged point.
Gl. Sibb.
 2. A jewel in one's cap.
Gl. Sibb.

Fr. esguilette, id. q. aculeata.

AIK, AYK, s. The oak, S. Plur. akis, oaks.
Douglas.

A. S. ac, aec, Alem. Germ. eiche, Su. G. ek, Isl. eik, quercus.

AIKERIT, part. adj. Eared; weil yaikert, having full ears; applied to grain, Tweedd, Pron. yaikert.
V. Aigars.

AIKRAW, s. Pitted warty lichen, L. scrobiculatus, Linn. South of S.
V. Staneraw.
Lightfoot.

AYLE, s.
 1. A projection from the body of a church, one of the wings of the transept, S.
 2. An inclosed and covered burial place, adjoining to a church, though not forming part of it, S.
Spalding.

Moes. G. and A. S. alh, templum.

AILICKEY, s. The bridegroom's man, he who attends on the bridegroom or is employed as his messenger at a wedding, Ang.

Su. G. e marriage, and lackey, Fr. lacquay, a runner.

AIN, adj. Own, S.
V. Awin.

AYND, END, s. The breath; also written end; A. Bor. Yane, id.
Barbour.

Isl. Su. G. ande, A. S. ond, halitus, spiritus.

To AYND, EAND, v. a. To breathe upon.
Bellenden.

Isl. and-a, Su. G. and-as, respirare.

AYNDING, s. The act of breathing.
Douglas.

AYNDING-STEDE, s. A breathing-place.
Douglas.

AYNDLESSE, adj. Breathless, out of breath.
Barbour.

AINS, adv. Once.
V. Anis.

AIR, AYR, AR, ARE, adv.
 1. Before, formerly.
Wallace.
 2. Early.
Fell air, very early in the morning.
Airer, compar.; airest, superl.
Wyntown.
Are morrow, early in the morning.
Douglas.

Moes. G. air, A. S. aer, Alem. er, Belg. eer, ante, prius; also tempus matutinum.

AIR, adj. Early, S.
Journ. Lond.

AIR, s. Expl. "hair, used for a thing of no value."
Bannatyne Poems.

Isl. aur, the smallest thing imaginable.

AIR, AIRE, AYR, AYRE, AR, s. An oar; still used, S. B.
Wallace.

A. S. Alem. are, Isl. aar, Dan. aere, Su. G. ara.

AIR, AIRE, AYR, s. An heir.
Barbour.

Moes. G. arbi, Su. G. arf, Lat. haeres, id.

AYRSCHIP, s. Inheritance, S.
Acts Ja. III.

AIR, AYRE, AYR, s. An itinerant court of justice; E. Eyre.
Wallace.

Lat. iter, O. Fr. eire.

AIRN, s. Iron, S.  Airns, pl. Fetters.

Isl. iarn, Su. G. iern.

V. Irne.

AIRT, ART, ARTH, AIRTH, s.
 1. Quarter of the heaven, point of the compass, S.
Douglas.
 2. A particular quarter of the earth.
Wallace.
On every art, on every hand, on all sides.
Douglas.

Gael. aird, a cardinal point; Germ. ort, wart, Belg. oorde, a place or quarter; Isl. vart, Moes. G. wairths, versus, towards.

To AIRT, ART, ERT, v. a.
 1. To direct, to mark out a certain course, used with respect to the wind, as blowing from a particular quarter, S.
Law Case.
 2. To give direction or instruction, in order to find out a certain person or place, or any other object, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.
 3. To airt on, to urge forward, Galloway.
Davidson.

AIRT and PART.
V. Art.

AISLAIR, adj. Polished, S.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

AISMENT, AYSYAMENT, s. Used in the same sense with E. easement, as denoting assistance, accommodation.

Fr. aisement, commodum.

Stat. Rob. I.

AIT, oat or oaten.
V. Aits.
Douglas.

AITS, s. pl. Oats, S. Wild aits, bearded oat-grass, S. Avena fatua, Linn.

A. S. ata, ate, avena.

AITEN, adj. Oaten, S.
Ritson.

AITH, AYTHE, s. An oath.
V. Athe.

AITH, or AIFTLAND, s. That kind of land called infield, which is made to carry oats a second time after barley, and has received no dung. Ang.

Perhaps from A. S. aeft, iterum.

AITH-HENNES, s. pl. Apparently heath-hens, as being bred on the heath.
Skene.

AYSYAMENT, s.
V. Aisment.

AIZLE, s. A hot ember.
V. Eizel.

AKYN, adj. Oaken.
Douglas.

ALAGUST, s. Suspicion.
V. Allagust.

ALAIS, s. pl. Alleys.
Wallace.

ALAK,
Wallace.
V. Lak.

ALAMONTI, ALLAMOTTI, s. The storm finch, Procellaria pelagica, Linn. Orkn.  The same with the Assilag of St Kilda.
Allamotti is the proper pronunciation.
Neill.

Ital. ala, a wing, and moto, motion.

ALANE, ALLANE, adj. Alone, S.
Wyntown.

Alem. alain, Germ. allein, alone; from all omnis, and ain, ein, unus.

ALANERLIE, adv.
V. Allanerly.

ALAREIT.
V. Lareit.

ALARS. Alars yet, apparently, the gate overspread with alder.
Palice Hon.

A. S. alr, Alem. ellra, the alder; Su. G. alar, of or belonging to the alder-tree.

ALAWE, adv. Downward, below.
V. Law, Lawe.

ALBLASTRIE, s. Apparently, the exercise of the cross-bow.
V. Awblaster.

ALCOMYE, s. Latten, a kind of mixed metal still used for spoons.
Hence, Accomie spunes, spoons made of alchymy, S. B.
Douglas.

From Fr. alquemie or O. E. alchymy.

ALD, ALDE, AULD, adj. Old, S. Yorks. O. E. ald, id.
Wyntown.
A. S. eald, Alem. alt, vetus; derived from A. S. eald-ian, to remain, to stay, to last, Alem. alten, to prolong.

To ALEGE, v. a. To absolve from allegiance.

Fr. alleg-er, id.

Wyntown.

ALEUIN, adj. Eleven.
Complaynt S.

ALGAIT, ALGATE, ALGATIS, adv.
 1. Every way.
Douglas.
 2. At all events, by all means.
Douglas.

O. E. all gate, R. Brunne; all gates, Chaucer.  From all, and gait, or gatis, i. e. all ways.

ALHALE, ALHALELY, adv. Wholly, entirely.
Douglas.

From all, and hale, hail, whole.

ALIENARE, s. A stranger.
Douglas.

Lat. alien-us.

ALYA, ALLIA, ALLYA, ALLAY, s.
 1. Alliance.
Wallace.
 2. An ally.
Acts Ja. VI.
 3. Sometimes used as a plural noun, signifying allies.
Bellenden.

Fr. allie, with a Saxon termination.

ALYAND, part. pr. Keeping close together.
Wallace.

Fr. alli-er, to join, to knit.

To ALYCHT, v. a. To enlighten.
Douglas.

A. S. alyht-an, illuminare; alyht-nysse, illuminatio.

ALIST. To come alist. To recover from faintness or decay, applied both to animals and vegetables; to recover from a swoon, S. B.
Ross.

Isl. lios, light; aliost, the dawn of day; at koma i liosi, to make manifest.

ALYTE, adv. A little.
V. Lite.
Lyndsay.

ALLAGRUGOUS, adj. Grim, ghastly.
Journ. Lond.

Perhaps from all, Moes. G. alla, and gruous, ghastly, q. v.

ALLAGUST, s. Suspicion.
Journ. Lond.

Fr. a le goust, has a taste or smack.

To ALLAYA, v. a. To ally.
Complaynt S.

Fr. alli-er.

ALLANERLIE, ALANERLY, ALLENARLY, adv. Only, solely, S.

From all, and anerly, only.

Reg. Maj.

ALL ANYS, adv. Together, in a state of union.
Wallace.

From all, A. S. eall, and anes, the genit. of an unus, q. all of one.

ALLARIS, ALLERIS, Common, universal, an old genitive used adjectively.  O. E. alre, id.
Wyntown.

A. S. allera, genit. pl. of all, omnis; Belg. aller, id.

V. Aller.

ALLA-VOLIE, ALLE-VOLIE, adv. At random, S.

Fr. à la volée.

Philotus.

ALLA-VOLIE, ALLE-VOLIE, adj. Giddy, volatile; "An alle-volie chield," a volatile fellow, S.

ALLE-MEN, adj. Common, universal.
Popul. Ball.

Su. G. all-maen, communis, Teut. alle-man, omnis homo, al-ghemeyn, universus.

ALLAR, ALLER, s. The alder, a tree, S.
Statist. Acc.

ALLER, adv. Wholly, entirely, altogether. Aller-hale, a pleonasm.
Barbour.

O. E. alder, id. often prefixed to a superlative.

V. Allaris.

ALLERIS, s. pl. The same with Allaris.
Douglas.

ALLEVIN, part. pa. Allowed, admitted.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. alef-an, concedere, permittere; Su. G. lofw-a, Moes. G. laub-jan, id.

ALLIA.
V. Alya.

ALLYNS, adv. Altogether, thoroughly.
Gawan and Gol.

Su. G. alleingis, allaengis, A. S. allinga, eallenga, omnino, prorsus.

ALLKYN, ALKIN, adj. All kind of, Aw kin kind, S. B.
Douglas.

A. S. eall-cyn, omnigenus.

ALL OUT, adv. In a great degree, beyond comparison.
Barbour.

To ALLOW, v. a.
 1. To approve of, generally with the prep. of subjoined.
Rollock.
 2. To praise, to commend.
Douglas.

Fr. allou-er, approbare, Su. G. lofw-a, laudare.

ALLPUIST, APIEST, APIECE, conj. Although, S. B. abies, Loth.
Jour. Lond.

Perhaps corr. from albeit.

ALLRYN, adj. Constantly, progressive, applied to time.
Barbour.

A. S. all omnis, and rinn-an, currere.

ALLSTRYNE, adj. Ancient.
Maitland Poems.

A. S. ald, old, and strynd, generation, or stryn-an, to beget.

ALLTHOCHTE, conj. Although.
Douglas.

A. S. all, all, and thohte, part. pa.  q. "every thing taken into consideration."
V. Thocht.

ALLUTERLIE, ALLUTTERLY, adv. Wholly, entirely.
Douglas.

A. S. all omnis, and uter, utter, exterior, from ut extra.

ALL-WEILDAND, adj. All-governing.
Wallace.

A. S. all, all, and weald-an, to govern; Franc. alluualt, Isl. all-valdur, omnipotent.

ALMANIE WHISTLE, a flagelet of a very small size, used by children, Aberd.

Thus denominated, because whistles of this kind were originally imported from Almanie, i. e. Germany.

ALMASER, ALMOSEIR, s. An almoner, or dispenser of alms.
Dunbar.

From Almous, alms.

ALMERIE, ALMORIE, s. Anciently a place where alms were deposited or distributed; in latter times used to denote a press or cupboard, where utensils for house keeping are laid up; the same with E. ambry.
Dunbar.

O. Fr. almoire, aumuire, A. S. almerige, repositorium, scrinium.

ALMOUS, ALMOWS, AUMIS, s. Alms, S. Almesse, O. E.
Wyntown.

A. S. almes, almesse; Sw. almosa; Gr. ελεημοσυνα.

ALPE, s. An elephant. Alpes bon, ivory.
Gl. Complaynt S.

A. S. elp, Lat. eleph-as; Heb. alaph, bos.

ALQUHARE, ALLQUHARE, adv. Every where.
Douglas.

From all, and quhare where.

ALRY, adj.
For its different senses, V. Elrische.

ALRYNE, s. Apparently a watch-tower, or the highest part of a castle.
Maitland Poems.

Su. G. hall-a defendere, hallare praesidium, hallarena watchmen.

ALS, conj. As; generally employed in the first part of a comparison; "Als fers as a lyoun," i. e. "As fierce as a lion."
Wallace.

From A. S. ealles, omnino; or eall swa, ita, tam.

ALS, ALSE, adv. Also, in the same manner.
V. Sua, Alsua.
Barbour.

A. S. eall swa, etiam.

ALSAME, ALSAMEN, adv. Altogether.
Douglas.

From A. S. eall all, and same together.  Alem. alsamen, simul.

ALSMEKLE, adv. As much.
Acts Ja. I.

From als, and mekle, much, great.

ALSONE, adv. As soon, with as subjoined.
Barbour.

Properly als sone, A. S. eall swa sona.

ALSUA, adv. Also.
Barbour.

A. S. alswa, sicut.

ALSWYTH, adv. Forthwith
Barbour.

From all, and swith, quickly, q. v.

ALUTERLY, adv.
V. Alluterlie.

ALWAIES, ALWAYIS, conj. Although; notwithstanding, however.
Bellenden.

AMAILLE, s. Enamel.
King's Quair.

Fr. Belg. email, Dan. amel; Teut. mael-en pingere, A. S. mael, imago.

AMAIST, adv. Almost, S. ameast, Westmorel.
Ross.

A. S. ealmaest, Belg. almeest, id.

AMANG, AMANGIS, prep.
 1. Among; amang, S. Westmorel.
Wyntown.
 2. At intervals, occasionally.
Barbour.

A. S. meng-an, Su. G. maeng-a, Isl. meng-a, to mix, to blend.

AMBASSATE, AMBASSIAT, s. An embassy, as denoting the persons sent considered collectively.
Douglas.

Fr. ambassade, id.

AMBRY, s. A press in which the provision for the daily use of a family in the country is locked up, S.
V. Almerie.

To AMEISE, AMESE, AMEYSS, v. a. To mitigate, to appease.
Barbour.

Franc. mezz-an, Germ. mass-en, moderari, mitigare; C. B. masw, soft.

AMENE, adj. Pleasant.
Douglas.

Lat. amoen-us, id.

AMERAND, adj. Green, verdant; probably written ameraud.
Douglas.

From the colour of the emerald, Fr. emeraud.

AMERIS, AUMERS, s. pl. Embers; aumers, S. B.
Douglas.

A. S. aemyria, Belg. ameren, Isl. eimyria, favilla.

AMYRALE, s. An admiral.
Wyntown.

Fr. amiral; Arab. amir, a lord, ameer al omrah, prince of the princes.

To AMIT, v. a. to admit.
Wallace.

AMMELYT, part. pa. Enamelled.
Douglas.

Fr. emaill-er, L. B. amayl-are, id.

To AMMONYSS, v. a. To admonish, to counsel.
V. Monesting.
Barbour.

AMORETTIS, s. pl. Loveknots, garlands.
King's Quair.

Fr. amourettes, love-tricks, dalliances, Cotgr.

To AMOVE, AMOW, v. a. To move with anger, to vex, to excite.
Wyntown.

Fr. emouv-oir, id.

AMOUR, s. Love.
Douglas.

Fr. id. Lat. amor.

AMSCHACH, s. A misfortune. S. B.
Ross.

Ir. Gael. anshogh, adversity, misery.

AMSHACK, s. Noose, fastening; probably the same with Ham-shackel, q. v.
Gl. Sibb.

To AN, v. a.
 1. To appropriate, to allot as one's own.
Sir Tristrem.
 2. To owe, to be indebted to.
Sir Trist.

Su. G. egn-a proprium facere, from egen proprius; A. S. agnian possidere, from agen proprius.

AN, AND, conj.
 1. If, S. "If, and An, spoils mony a gude charter," S. Prov.
Barbour.
 2. Sometimes used as equivalent to E. although.
W. Guthrie.

Su. G. aen si, et; Isl. end, id.

To ANALIE, v. a. To dispone, to alienate; a juridical term.
Reg. Maj.

By transposition from Lat. alien-are.

ANALIER, s. One who alienates property, by transporting it to another country.

Lat. alien-ator.

Stat. Rob. I.

To ANAME, v. a. To call over names, to muster.
Wyntown.

To ANARME, ANNARME, v. a. To arm.
Acts Ja. I.

ANCLETH, HANCLETH, s. The ancle.
Gl. Sibb.

AND, conj.
V. An.

ANE, adj. One, S.
Barbour.

Moes. G. ain; A. S. an, ane; anc. Su. G. an; mod. Su. G. en; Isl. Germ. ein; Belg. een, id.

ANE, article, signifying one, but with less emphasis.
Barbour.

To ANE, v. n. To agree, to accord. Pret. anyd.
Wyntown.

Germ. ein-en, concordare, convenire; Su. G. en-a, firmiter aliquid proponere; Isl. eining, unio; Su. G. enig; Germ. einig. concors.

ANEABIL, s. A single woman; properly one who is used as a concubine.
Reg. Maj.

O. Fr. anable, habile, capable, convenable, from L. B. inhabil-is, valde habilis; Gl. Roquefort.

ANEDING, s. Breathing.
V. Aynd, v.
Barbour.

ANEFALD, adj. Honest, acting a faithful part, the same with Afald.
Douglas.

ANELIE, adv. Only.
R. Bruce.

ANELYD, part. pa. Aspired; literally, panted for.
Wyntown.

Fr. anhel-er, to aspire after; Lat. anhel-are, L. B. anel-are.

ANENS, ANENST, ANENT, ANENTIS, prep.
 1. Over against, opposite to, S.
Barbour.
 2. Concerning, about, in relation to; still used by old people, S.
Acts Ja. I.

Gr. αναντι, oppositum; A. S. ongean, ex adverso.

To ANERD, ANNERE.
V. Anherd.

ANERLY, ANYRLY, adv. Only, alone, singly. Hence allanerly.
Barbour.

A. S. anre, tantum; Germ. einer, solus, from an and ein, unus.

ANERLY, ANERLIE, adj. Single, solitary; only.
G. Buchanan.

ANETH, prep. Beneath, S.
Bord. Minstrelsy.

A. S. on in, and neothan, deorsum; Isl. nedan, Belg. neden. Su. G. ned. id.

ANEUCH, adv. (gutt.) Enough, S.
Dunbar.

A. S. genog, genoh, satis, deduced by H. Tooke from genog-an, multiplicare; perhaps rather from Moes. G. janoh multi, many.

ANEWIS, s. pl. "Budding flowers," Tytler.
King's Quair.

Perhaps rings, from Fr. anneau, annulus.

ANGELL-HEDE, s. The hooked or barbed head of an arrow.
Wallace.

A. S. Dan. Germ. angel, a hook, an angle; Teut. anghel, a sting, O. Teut. anghel-en, to sting.

ANGIR, s. Grief, vexation.
Wyntown.

Gr. ἀγγρις, grief; Isl. angr, dolor, moeror; Su. G. Isl. angra, dolore afficere, deduced by Ihre from aung-a premere, arctare.

To ANHERD, ANERD, ANNERE, ENHERDE, v. n. To consent, to adhere.
Wyntown.

A. S. anhraed, anraed, signifies constans, concors, unanimis; apparently from an one, and raed counsel.  But I find O. Fr. enherdance rendered by Roquefort, adherence, attachment.  Lat. inhaerere, to cleave, or stick fast in, or to, is therefore the more probable origin.

ANIEST, adv. or prep. On this side of, Ayrs.; q. "on the nearest side." This is opposed to Adist, adiest, on that side.

A. S. on neawiste, in vicinia, prope ad; or on and neahst proximus, from neah near, E. nigh.

ANYD, pret. Agreed.
V. Ane, v.

ANYNG, s. Agreement, concord.
Wyntown.

ANIS, ANYS, AINS, adv. Once; pron. as ainze, or yince, S. eenze, S. B.
Douglas.

The genit. of A. S. an, unus, one, anes unius, also rendered semel, q. actio unius temporis.

ANIS, ANNIS, s. pl.
 1. Asses.
Chron. S. P.
 2. Metaphor used for foolish fellows.
Bannatyne P.

Fr. asne, Lat. asinus; Su. G. asna, Isl. esne.

ANYS, the genitive of Ane, one.
V. Anis.

ANKER-SAIDELL, HANKERSAIDLE, s. A hermit, an anchorite.
Philotus.

A. S. ancer-setle, an anchorite's cell or seat, a hermitage; from ancer, a hermit, Lat. anachoreta, Gr. αναχωρητης.

ANKERSTOCK, s. A large loaf, of an oblong form. The name is extended to a wheaten loaf, but properly belongs to one made of rye, S.
Gl. Sibb.

Q. an anchorite's stock, or supply; or from some fancied resemblance to the stock of an anchor.

ANLAS, s. Properly "a kind of knife or dagger usually worn at the girdle," as the term occurs in Chaucer; but used to denote a pike fixed in the cheveron of a horse.
Sir Gawan.

Franc. anelaz, analeze, adlaterale telum, from lez latus, the side; C. B. anglas, a dagger; L. B. anelac-ius, id.

ANN, s. A half-year's salary legally due to the heirs of a minister, in addition to what was due expressly according to the period of his incumbency, S.
Acts Cha. II.

Fr. annate, L. B. annata.

ANMAILLE, s. Enamel.
V. Amaille.

To ANORNE, v. a. To adorn.
Douglas.

L. B. inorn-are, Tertullian.

ANSE, ANZE, ENSE, conj. Else, otherwise, Ang.

Allied perhaps to Su. G. annars alias.

To ANTER, v. n.
 1. To adventure, S. B.
Ross.
 2. To chance, to happen, S. B.
Journ. Lond.
 3. In the form of a participle, as signifying occasional, single, rare.
An antrin ane, one of a kind met with singly and occasionally, or seldom, S.
Ferguson.

To be viewed as the same with Aunter, q. v.

ANTERCAST, s. A misfortune, a mischance, S. B.
Ross.

Anter, or aunter, adventure, and cast, a chance, q. something accidental.

ANTETEWME, s. "Antetune, antiphone, response," L. Hailes.
Bannatyne P.

ANTYCESSOR, ANTECESSOWR, ANTECESTRE, s. An ancestor, a predecessor. Lat. antecessor.
Wallace.

APAYN, part. pa. Provided, furnished.
Barbour.

Fr. appan-é, having received a portion, appan-er to give a portion, L. B. apan-are, id. from pain, Lat. pan-is, as originally denoting the supply of bread and other necessaries of life.

APAYN, adv.
 1. Reluctantly, unwillingly; sometimes written distinctly, a payn.
Barbour.
 2. Hardly, scarcely.
Wallace.
 3. It seems improperly used for in case.
Wallace.
 4. Under pain, at the risk of. In editions, on payn.
Wallace.

Fr. à peine, "scarcely, hardly, not without much ado," Cotgr.

A PER SE, "An extraordinary or incomparable person; like the letter A by itself, which has the first place in the alphabet of almost all languages;" Rudd. Chaucer id.
Douglas.

APERSMAR, APIRSMART, adj. Crabbed, ill-humoured; snell, calschie, S. synon.
Douglas.

A. S. afor, afre, Isl. apur, asper, (as apurkylde, acre frigus); and A. S. smeorte, Su. G. smarta, pain.  Haldorson remarks, that the Isl. term is also applied to one of austere manners.

APERT, adj. Brisk, bold, free.
Barbour.

Fr. appert, expert, prompt; Lat. apparat-us, prepared.

APERT. In apert, adv. Evidently, openly.
Barbour.

Fr. apert, appert, open, evident; from appar-oir, Lat. appar-ere, to appear.

APERTLY, adv. Briskly, readily.
V. Apert, adj.
Barbour.

APIEST, APIECE, conj. Although.
V. Allpuist.

APILL RENYEIS, s. pl. A string, or necklace of beads; q. a rein or bridle of beads, formed like apples.
Dunbar.

APLIGHT, adv. Completely; O. E. apliht.
Sir Tristrem.

A. S. on and pliht periculum, pliht-an periculo objicere se.

APON, APOUN, prep. Upon, S.
Barbour.

A. S. ufa, Su. G. uppa, insuper, and on.

APORT, APORTE, s. Deportment, carriage.
Wyntown.

Fr. apport, from apport-er, to carry; Lat. ad and port-are.

To APPAIR, v. a. To injure, to impair, O. E. apeir.
Detect. Q. Mary.

Fr. emper-er, id.

V. Pare, v.

APPARELLE, APPARYLE, APPARAILL, s. Equipage, furniture for warfare, preparations for a siege, whether for attack or defence; ammunition.
Barbour.

Fr. appareil, provision, furniture, preparations for war.

APPIN, adj. Open, S.
Complaynt S.

Dan. aaben apertus; Isl. opna foramen.  Wachter derives Germ. offen, apertus, from auf up.

APPLERINGIE, s. Southernwood, S. Artemisia abrotanum, Linn.

Fr. apilé strong, and auronne southernwood, from Lat. abrotanum, id.

To APLEIS, APPLESS, v. a. To satisfy, to content, to please.
Wallace.

Apparently from an obsolete Fr. v. of the form of applaire.

APPLY, s. Plight, condition.
Sir Egeir.

Fr. pli state, habit.

To APPORT, v. a. To bring, to conduce.

Fr. apport-er, id.

R. Bruce.

To APPREUE, APPRIEVE, v. a. To approve.
Douglas.

Fr. approuver, Lat. approbare.

AR, ARE, adv. Formerly; also, early.
V. Air.

To AR, ARE, ERE, v. a. To plough, to till, S. to ear, E
Douglas.

Moes. G. ar-ian, Su. G. aer-ia.  Isl. er-ia, A. S. er-ian, Alem. err-en, Germ. er-en, Gr. αρ-ειν, Lat. ar-are.  Ihre views Heb. ץאר ar-etz, earth, as the fountain.

ARAGE, ARRAGE, ARYAGE, AUARAGE, AVERAGE, s. Servitude due by tenants, in men and horses, to their landlords. This custom is not entirely abolished in some parts of Scotland. "Arage and carriage" is a phrase still commonly used in leases.
Skene.

L. B. averag-ium, from aver-ia, a beast for work; and this perhaps from Fr. ouvre work.

To ARAS, ARRACE, v. a.
 1. To snatch or pluck away by force.
Wyntown.
 2. To raise up.
Douglas.

This sense is so different from the former, that it might rather seem to be put for arraise, q. to raise up.

Fr. arrach-er, to tear, to pull by violence; to pull up by the roots, from Lat. eradic-are.

ARBY, s. The sea-gilliflower, Orkn.
Neill.

ARBY-ROOT, s. The root of the sea-pink, or Statice armeria, Orkn.

ARCH, ARGH, AIRGH, ERGH, (gutt.) adj.
 1. Averse, reluctant; often including the idea of timidity as the cause of reluctance, S.
Douglas.
 2. Apprehensive, filled with anxiety, S. Chaucer, erke, weary, indolent.
Popul. Ball.

A. S. earg, desidiosus, iners, slothful, sluggish, earh fugax, "timorous, and ready to run away for fear," Somn. Isl. arg-ur, reformidans; arg-r piger, deses; Su. G. arg, ignavus.  Among the Goths argur, L. B. arga, denoted a poltroon, a coward.

To ARCH, ARGH, v. n. To hesitate, to be reluctant.
V. Ergh, v.

ARCHNES, ARGHNESS, s.
 1. Reluctance, backwardness.
Wodrow.
 2. Obliquely used for niggardliness, q. reluctance to part with any thing.
Legend Bp. St Androis.

To AREIK, ARREIK, v. a. To reach, to extend.
Douglas.

A. S. arecc-an, assequi, to get, to attain.

AREIR, adv. Back.
To rin areir, to decline.
Lyndsay.

Fr. arriere backward; Lat. a retro.

ARESOUND, pret. Perhaps, called in question; Fr. aresoner, interroger, questionner, demander; ratiocinari; Gl. Roquefort.  Areson is used by R. Brunne in the sense of persuade, or reason with.

Sir Tristrem.

ARETTYT, part. pa. Accused, brought into judgment.
Barbour.

L. B. rect-are, ret-are, arett-are, accusare, in jus vocare, Du Cange.

ARGENT CONTENT, Ready money. Fr. argent comptant, id.
Bellenden.

To ARGH, v. n. To hesitate.
V. Arch, and Ergh, v.

ARGIE, s. Assertion in a dispute, the specific plea which one uses in disputation, S. B.

Su. G. ierga, semper eadem obgannire; Isl. iarg-r, keen contention.

To ARGLE-BARGLE, AURGLE-BARGIN, v. n. To contend, to bandy backwards and forwards, S.
Argle-bargin, Loth. Eaggle-bargin, synon.
Ramsay.

Isl. arg enraged, jarg-a to contend.

To ARGONE, ARGOWNE, ARGWE, ARGEW, v. a.
 1. To argue, to contend by argument.
Bannatyne Poems.
 2. To censure, to reprehend, to chide with.
Wallace.

Fr. argu-er, Lat. argu-ere.

ARGUESYN, s. The lieutenant of a galley; he who has the government and keeping of the slaves committed to him.
Knox.

Fr. argousin, satelles remigibus regendis et custodiendis praepositus, Dict. Trev.

To ARGUMENT, v. a. To prove, to shew.
Crosraguel.

Lat. argument-ari, to reason.

ARK, s. A large chest, especially one used for holding corn or meal, S.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. arce, erce, a chest, a coffer; Alem. arca; Su. G. ark, Lat. arca, Gael. arc.

Hence,

Eel-Ark, s. That kind of box which is placed in lakes, ponds, &c., for catching and retaining eels; a term common in old deeds.

ARK of a Mill, the place in which the centre-wheel runs, S.

ARK-BEIN, the bone called the os pubis, S. B.

To ARLE, v. a.
 1. To give an earnest of any kind, S.
 2. To give a piece of money for confirming a bargain, S.
 3. To put a piece of money into the hand of a seller, at entering into a bargain, as a security that he shall not sell to another while he retains this money, S.
Skene.

L. B. arrh-are, arrhis sponsam dare, Fr. arrh-er, arr-er.

ARLES, ERLIS, ARLIS, ARLIS-PENNY, AIRLE PENNY, s.
 1. An earnest of whatever kind, a pledge of full possession, S. A. Bor.
Wyntown.
 2. A piece of money given for confirming a bargain, S. A. Bor.
Acts Ja. IV.
 3. A piece of money put into the hands of a seller when one begins to cheapen any commodity; as a pledge that the seller shall not strike a bargain, or even enter into terms with another while he retains the arles, S.

Lat. arrhabo, arrha, Gael. iarlus, id.

ARLICH, ARLITCH, adj. Sore, fretted, painful, S. B.
V. Arr.

Su. G. arg iratus, arg-a laedere, Dan. arrig, troublesome; as we say, "an angry sore;" or from Su. G. aerr cicatrix, whence aerrig vulneratus.

ARLY, adv. Early.
Barbour.

A. S. arlice, matutinè.

ARMYN, ARMYNG. s. Armour, arms.
Wyntown.

ARN, s. The alder; a tree, S. pronounced in some counties q. arin.

C. B. uern, Arm. vern, guern, Gael. fearn, alnus.

ARN, v. subst. Are, the third pers. plural; Chaucer arn.
Sir Gawan.

A. S. aron, sunt.

ARNS, s. pl. The beards of corn, S. B. synon. awns.

Franc. arn spica.

ARNUT, LOUSY ARNOT, s. Tall oat-grass or pignut; Bunium bulbocastanum, or flexuosum, Linn. S.
Yurnut.
A. Bor.
Lightfoot.

Corr. from earth-nut.

ARR, s. A scar, S.  A. Bor.
Pock-arrs, the marks left by the small-pox, S. Lancash.

Su. G. aerr, Isl. aer, cicatrix.

ARRED, part. adj. Scarred, having the marks of a wound or sore.
Hence, Pock arred, marked by the small-pox, S.

Dan. arred cicatrised; Isl. aerra cicatrices facere.

To ARRACE.
V. Aras.

ARRONDELL, s. The swallow, a bird.
Burel.

Fr. arondelle, hirondelle, from Lat. hirundo, id.

ARSECOCKLE, s. A hot pimple on the face or any part of the body, S. B. The term seems originally to have been confined to pimples on the hips; synon. with Teut. aers bleyne, tuberculus in ano.

ARSEENE, s. The quail.
Houlate.

A. S. aerschen, coturnix, also erschenn, from ersc and henn, q. gallina vivarii.

ARSELINS, adv. Backwards, Clydes. S. B.
Ross.

Belg. aersel-en, to go backwards; aerseling receding; aerselincks, retro.

ARSOUN, s. Buttocks.
Barbour.

ART, ARD.
This termination of many words, denoting a particular habit or affection, is analogous to Isl. and Germ. art, Belg. aart, nature, disposition; as E. drunkard, bastard; Fr. babillard, a stutterer; S. bombard, bumbart, a drone, stunkart, of a stubborn disposition; hastard, hasty, passionate.

ART and PART, Accessory to, or abetting, a forensic phrase, S. used in a bad sense. Art denotes the instigation or advice, Part the share that one has in the commission of a crime.
Erskine.

The terms are frequently used in the way of discrimination, "Art or part."

Wyntown.

Borrowed from the Lat. phrase, Artem et partem habuit.

ARTAILYE, s. Artillery; applied to offensive weapons of what kind soever, before the introduction of fire arms.
V. Artillied.
Wallace.

ARTATION, s. Excitement, instigation.
Bellenden.

L. B. artatio, from arto for arcto, arc, to constrain.

ARTILLIED, part. pa. Provided with artillery.
Pitscottie.

Fr. artill-er, to furnish with ordinance.

ARTHURY'S HUFE, the name given to the constellation Arcturus.
Douglas.
V. Hoif.

ARTOW, Art thou? used interrogatively, S. the verb and pronoun being often, in colloquial language, conjoined in Scottish, as in Germ. and Isl.

Isl. ertu, id.

King's Quair.
Ertow, id.
Ywaine and Gawin.

AS, conj. Than, S. synon. with nor.
Kelly.

AS, ASS, ASSE, ALSE, s. Ashes; plur. assis, S. ass and aiss; A. Bor. ass, Cumberl. esse, id.
Dunbar.

Moes. G. asja, Alem. asca, Germ. and Belg. asche, Su. G. and Isl. aska, cinis.

ASSHOLE, s. The place for receiving the ashes under the grate; S. Lancash. esshole, ashole, id.
V. Preceding word.

ASCHET, s. A large flat plate on which meat is brought to the table, S.

Fr. assiette, "a trencher-plate," Cotgr.

ASYNIS, s. pl. Asses.
Bellenden.

Fr. asne, Lat. asin-us.

ASK, AWSK, s. An eft, a newt; a kind of lizard, S.; asker, A. Bor.
Wyntown.

Germ. eidechs, eidex; Franc. edehsa; A. S. athexe; Belg. egdisse, haagdisse, id.  Wachter deduces the Germ. word from ey, eg, ovum, and tyg-en gignere, q. "produced from an egg."

ASKLENT, ASCLENT, ASKLINT, adv. Obliquely, asquint, on one side, S. Aslant, E.
R. Bruce.

Swed. slant, obliquus, from slind latus.

ASPECT, s. The serpent called the asp, or aspik, Fr. aspic.
Burel.

ASPERANS, adj. Lofty, elevated, pompous; applied to diction.
Wallace.

Fr. aspirant, Lat. aspirans, aspiring.

ASPERT, adj. Harsh, cruel.
King's Quair.

Fr. aspre, Lat. asper.

ASPYNE, s. From the connexion, apparently meant to denote a boat.
Barbour.

Swed. esping, a long boat, Teut. hespinghe, espinck, cymba, a small boat.

ASPRE, adj. Sharp.
V. Aspert.
Wallace.

ASPRESPER, s. Perhaps q. "sharp spear;" like aspre bow, also used by Blind Harry.
Wallace.

Fr. asper, dur, rude, bâton noueux; Gl. Roquefort.

ASPRIANCE, s.
V. Asperans.

To ASS, v. a. To ask.
Henrysone.

Germ. eisch-en, Fran. eiscon, interrogare.

ASS, s. Ashes.
V. As.

To ASSAILYIE, v. a. To attack, to assail.
Wallace.

Fr. assaill-ir; L. B. adsal-ire, assal-ire, invadere, aggredi.

ASSAYIS, s. Assize, convention.
Wyntown.

ASSEDATION, s.
 1. A lease; a term still commonly used in our legal deeds, S.
Balfour.
 2. The act of letting in lease.

L. B. assedatio.

Chalmerl. Air.

To ASSEGE, v. a. To besiege.
Wyntown.

Fr. assieg-er, L. B. assidiare, obsidere; from Lat. ad, and sedeo.

To ASSEMBLE, v. n. To join in battle.
Wyntown.

Fr. assembl-er, from Su. G. saml-a, Germ. saml-en, Belg. zamel-en, congregare; from Su. G. and Germ. sam, a prefix denoting association and conjunction.

ASSEMBLÉ, s. Engagement, battle.
Wyntown.

ASSENYHE, s. The word of war.

Corr. from Ensenyie, q. v.

Barbour.

ASSILAG, s. The stormy petrel, a bird; Procellaria pelagica, Linn.
Martin.

Perhaps from Gael. eascal, Ir. eashal, a storm.

ASSILTRIE, s. An axle-tree.
Douglas.

Fr. asseul, Ital. assile, axis.

To ASSYTH, ASSYITH, SYITH, SITHE, v. a. To make a composition to another, to satisfy, Old E. asseeth, asseth, id.
Acts Ja. I.

Lat. ad and A. S. sithe, vice; Skinner.  Rather from Su. G. and Isl. saett-a conciliare; reconciliare.  Ir. and Gael. sioth-am, to make atonement.

ASSYTH, ASSYTHMENT, SYTH, SITHEMENT, s. Compensation, satisfaction, atonement for an offence. Assythment is still used as a forensic term. S. O. E. aseeth, Wiclif.
Wyntown.

This word is still in use in our courts of law, as denoting satisfaction for an injury done to any party.
Su. G. saett, reconciliation, or the fine paid in order to procure it.

To ASSOILYIE, v. a.
 1. To acquit, to free from a charge or prosecution; a forensic term much used in our courts, S.
Reg. Maj.
 2. To absolve from an ecclesiastical censure; as from excommunication.
Bellenden.

Old E. assoil, asoilen, and asoul, denote the absolution by a priest; P. Ploughman.

 3. To pronounce absolution from sin, in consequence of confession.
Abp. Hamiltoun.
 4. To absolve from guilt one departed, by saying masses for the soul; according to the faith of the Romish church.
Barbour.
 5. Used improperly, in relation to the response of an oracle; apparently in the sense of resolving what is doubtful.
Douglas.
 6. Also used improperly, as signifying to unriddle.
Z. Boyd.

O. Fr. assoilé, absoillé, dechargé, absous, despensé; Gl. Roquefort; corr. from Lat. absolv-ere.

To ASSONYIE, ESSONYIE, v. a.
 1. To offer an excuse for absence from a court of law.
Stat. K. Will.
 2. Actually to excuse; the excuse offered being sustained.
Quon. Attach.
 3. To decline the combat, to shrink from an adversary.
Wallace.
O. E. asoyned, excused; R. Glouc. Essoine, a legal excuse, Chaucer.

V. Essonyie, s.

Fr. essoyner, exon-ier, to excuse from appearing in court, or going to the wars.   Su. G. son-a, Germ. sun-en, to reconcile, to explain; Moes. G. sunj-an, to justify.

ASSURANCE, s. To take assurance of an enemy; to submit, to do homage, under the condition of protection.
Complaynt S.

Fr. donner assurement, fidem dare; L. B. assecur-are, from Lat. ad and secur-us.

ASTALIT, part. pa. Decked or set out.
Gawan and Gol.

Fr. estail-er, to display, to shew.

To ASTART, ASTERT, v. n.
 1. To start, to fly hastily.
King's Quair.
 2. To start aside from, to avoid.
King's Quair.

Teut. steert-en, to fly; Germ, starz-en, to start up.

ASTEER, adv. In confusion, in a bustling state; S. q. on stir.
Ritson.

ASTRE, s. A star; Fr.
Chron. S. Poet.

AT, conj. That; O. E. id. Gower.
Barbour.

Dan. and Swed. at, quod; Su. G. att, a conjunction corresponding to Lat. ut.

AT, pron. That, which.
Wyntown.

AT ALL, adv. "Altogether," Rudd.; perhaps, at best, at any rate.
Douglas.

ATANIS, ATTANIS, ATANYS, ATONIS, adv. At once; S. at ainze.
V. Anis, Anys.
Gawan and Gol.

ATCHESON, ATCHISON, s. A billon coin, or rather copper washed with silver, struck in the reign of James VI., of the value of eight pennies Scots, or two-thirds of an English penny.
Ruddiman.

From the name of the assay-master of the mint.

ATHARIST, Houlate III. 10.
V. Citharist.

ATHE, AITH, AYTHE, s. An oath; plur. athis.
Barbour.

Moes. G. aith, A. S. ath, Precop. eth, Isl. aed, Su. G. ed, Dan. and Belg. eed, Alem. and Germ. eid, juramentum.

ATHER, conj. Either.
V. Athir.
R. Bruce.

ATHIL, ATHILL, HATHILL, adv. Noble, illustrious.
Houlate.

A. S. aethel, nobilis; whence Aetheling, Atheling, a youth of the blood royal; Su. G. adel, id.; adling, juvenis nobilis; deduced from ancient Gothic aelt, kindred.  C. B. eddyl is also equivalent to Lat. gens, cognatio.

ATHIL, HATHEL, s. A noble prince, a man, an illustrious personage; plur. athilles, (erroneously achilles,) hatheles.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

ATHIR, ATHYR, pron.
 1. Either, whichsoever.
Wyntown.
 2. Mutual, reciprocal.
Bellenden.

A. S. aegther, uterque.

V. Either.

ATHORT, prep. Through, S.; athwart, E.
V. Thortour.
Baillie.

ATHORT, adv. Abroad, far and wide.
Baillie.

ATIR, EATIR, s. Gore, blood mixed with matter.
Douglas.

A. S. ater, aetter, aettor; Alem. eitir, Isl. and Germ. eiter, Su. G. etter, venenum; from Alem. eit-en, to burn.

ATO, adv. In twain.
Sir Tristrem.

A. S. on twa, in duo.

ATOUR, s. Warlike preparation.

Fr. atour, attire.

Barbour.

ATOUR, ATTOURE, prep.
 1. Over, S.
Wallace.
 2. Across, S.
Wallace.
 3. Beyond, as to time; exceeding.
Quon. Att.
 4. Exceeding in number.
Wyntown.

Fr. a tour, en tour, au tour, circum; or Su. G. at, denoting motion towards a place, and oefwer, over.

ATOUR, ATTOUR, adv.
 1. Moreover, By and attour, id. Laws, S.
Pitscottie.
 2. Out from, or at an indefinite distance from the person speaking, or the object spoken of.
Douglas.
To stand attour, to keep off; to go attour, to remove to some distance, S.
By and attour, prep. Besides, over and above, S.
Spalding.

ATRY, ATTRIE, adj.
 1. Purulent, containing matter; applied to a sore that is cankered, S.
R. Bruce.
 2. Stern, grim, S. B.; attern, fierce, cruel, snarling; Gloucest.
V. Atir, Eatir.
Ross.

Belg. etterig, full of matter; eiter-en, to suppurate.

ATRYS, s. pl. Perhaps from Fr. atour, a French hood.
Watson's Coll.

ATRYST, s. Appointment, assignation,
V. Tryst.
Dunbar.

ATTAMIE, A skeleton, S.

Abbreviated from Fr. anatomie.

ATTEILLE, ATTEAL, ATTILE, s. Apparently the wigeon; being distinguished from the teal.
Acts Ja. VI.

Isl. tialld-r, turdus marinus.

ATTELED, part. pa. Aimed.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.
V. Ettle.

ATTEMPTAT, s. A wicked or injurious enterprise.
Bellenden.

L. B. attemptat-io, nefaria molitio, scelus, Gall. attentat; Du Cange.

ATTER-CAP, ATTIR-COP, s.
 1. A spider, S. Attercop, attercob, id. A. Bor.
Montgomery.
 2. An ill-natured person; one of a virulent or malignant disposition, S.

A. S. atter-coppe, atter-coppa, aranea, from atter venenum, and coppe calix, q. "a cup full of venom;" like Isl. eitrorm a serpent, i. e. "a poisonous worm."

ATTOUR, prep.
V. Atour.

ATWEESH, prep. Between.
Shirrefs.

Franc. tuisc, entuishan, Belg. tuschen, inter.

AVA', adv. At all, S.
Ross.

Corr. from af or of, and all.

AVAILL, s. Abasement, humiliation.
Dunbar.

Fr. aval-er, avall-er, to fall down; aval, en descendant, au bas, en bas; ad vall-em; Gl. Roquefort.

To AUALE, v. n. To descend.
V. Availl.
Douglas.

AUANT, AWANT, s. Boast, vaunt; Chaucer, id.
Douglas.

AVANTCURRIER, s. One of the fore-runners of an army, the same perhaps that are now called picquet-guards.
Godscroft.

Fr. avantcoureur, from avant before, and courir to run.

AUCHINDORAS, s. A large thorn-tree at the end of a house; Fife.

AUCHLIT, s. Two stones weight, or a peck measure, being half of the Kirkcudbright bushel; Galloway.

AUCHT, AWCHT, (gutt.) pret. of Aw.
 1. Possessed. Auht, id.  R.Brunne.
Wyntown.
 2. Owed, was indebted, id. R. Brunne.
Wyntown.

AUCHT, (gutt.) v. imp. Ought, should.
Douglas.
Auchten occurs in the same sense.
Douglas.

A. S. aht-on, the third pers. plur. pret. of A. S. ag-an, possidere.

AUCHT, s. Possession, property; what is exclusively one's own. In aw my aucht, in my possession, viewed at its utmost extent, S.
V. Best Aucht.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. aht; Moes. G. aigin, aihn, peculiaris ac propria possessio.

AUCHT, (gutt.) adj. Eight, S. auhte, O. E. id.  R. Brunne.
Wyntown.

Moes. G. aht-au, A. S. eaht-a, Germ. aht, Belg. acht, Isl. and Su. G. att-a, Gael. ocht, Lat. oct-o.

AUCHTAND, AUCHTEN, adj. The eighth. Isl. aatunde, octavus.
Douglas.

AVENAND, adj. Elegant in person and manners.
Gawan and Gol.

Fr. advenant, avenant, handsome; also, courteous.

AVENTURE, In aventure, adv. Lest, perchance.
V. Aunter.
Bellenden.

Fr. à l'aventure, id.

AVER, AVIR, AIVER, s.
 1. A horse used for labour, a cart-horse, S.
Bellenden.
 2. An old horse, one that is worn out with labour, S.
Dunbar.
 3. A gelded goat, S.
V. Hebrun.
Statist. Acc.

L. B. afferi, affri, jumenta vel cavalli colonici; averia, averii, equi, boves, jumenta; Du Cange.

V. Arage.

AVERIL, s. Apparently a diminutive from aver, a beast for labour.
Dunbar.

AVERILE, AVYRYLE, s. April.
Wyntown.

AVERIN, AVEREN, AIVERIN, s. Cloudberry or knoutberry, S. Rubus chamaemorus, Linn.; eaten as a dessert in the north of S.
Ross.

Perhaps from Germ. aver wild, and en, a term now applied in Su. G. to the berry of the juniper; Gael. oidh' rac, oirak.

AVIL, s. The second crop after lea or grass; Galloway.
V. Awat.

AVILLOUS, adj. Contemptible, debased.
Chron. Scot. P.

Fr. avili, ie, in contemptionem adductus; Dict. Trev.

AUISE, s. Advice, counsel; avis, Chaucer; avys, R. Brunne.

Fr. avis.

Douglas.

AVYSE, AWISE, s. Manner, fashion.
Douglas.

A. S. wisa, wise, Alem. uuis, uuisa, Belg. wijse, modus.

AVISION, s. Vision; Chaucer, id.
Douglas.

Fr. avision, vision, fantaisie; Gl. Roquefort.

AUKWART, AWKWART, prep. Athwart, across.
Wallace.

AULD, s. Age.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

A. S. aeld senectus, Moes. G. alds aetas.

V. Eild.

AULDFARREN, adj. Sagacious, S.; audfarand, id. A. Bor.
Ramsay.

Moes. G. ald old, and Swed. far-a, Germ. far-en, experiri; Swed. faren, Isl. farinn, peritus; Belg. aervaaren, skilful.

AULD-MOU'D, adj. Sagacious in discourse; sometimes implying the idea of craft, S. B.
Ross.

From auld old, and mou' or mow, the mouth.

AULD-FATHER, s. A grandfather; a term used by some in the west of S.

A. S. eald-faeder, Belg. oud-vader, avus.

AULD-WARLD, adj. Antique, antiquated, S.
Ferguson.

From auld old, and warld world.

AULIN. Scouti-aulin, Dirty Aulin, the arctic gull, Orkn. Loth.
Pennant.
V. Scouti-Aulin, and Skaitbird.

AULTRAGES, AULTERAGES, s. pl. The emoluments arising from the offerings made at an altar, or from the rents appointed for the support of it.
Spotswood.

L. B. altarag-ium, alterag-ium, obventio altaris; Du Cange.

AUMERS, s. pl. Embers.
V. Ameris.

To AUNTER, AWNTYR, v. a. To hazard, to put into the power of accident.
Barbour.

Fr. aventur-er, risquer, mettre au hazard; Dict. Trev.

Aunter is used by Chaucer and Gower in a neuter sense.
V. Anter, v.

AUNTER, s. Adventure; O. E. antre, R. Brunne.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

Fr. aventure, auenture, abbreviated.

AUNTEROUS, adj. Adventurous.
Gl. Sibb.

O. Fr. aventureux, hasardé; L. B. adventor-ius; Gl. Roquefort.

To AVOKE, v. a. To call away, to keep off.

Lat. avoc-are.

Baillie.

AVOUTERIE, ADVOUTERIE, s. Adultery.
Gl. Sibb.

O. Fr. avoutrie; Ital. avolteria; Lat. adulter-ium; Teut. vouter-en, fornicare, camerare.

AVOW, AVOWE, s.
 1. A vow; used in the same sense by Chaucer.
Douglas.
 2. Discovery, declaration; in modern language, avowal.
Minstrelsy Bord.

Fr. avou-er, to confess.

AUSTIE, adj. Austere, harsh.
Henrysone.

A. S. ostige, knotty, from ost, Teut. oest, a knot, properly in wood.

To AW, AWE, v. a. To owe, S.
Wallace.

Isl. aa, atte, debeo, debuit; A. S. ag, ahte; Su. G. a; Moes. G. aih, habeo, imperf. aiht-a.

V. Aigh, Aucht.

AW, sometimes to be viewed as the third pers. sing. of the v.; signifying owed, ought.
Wallace.

To AUCHT, AWCHT, AUGHT, v. a. To owe.
V. Aw.
Peblis to the Play.

AW, used for All, S.
Bannatyne P.
Wyth aw, withal.
Douglas.

AWA, adv. Away; the general pronunciation in S.
Douglas.

To AWAIL, AWAL, v. a.
 1. To let fall.
Barbour.
 2. To descend; used in a neuter sense.
Wallace.

Fr. aval-er, to go, or fall, down; also, to let fall; Teut. af-vall-en, decidere; af-val, casus; Su. G. afal, affal, lapsus.

To AWAILL, AWAILYE, v. n. To avail.
Barbour.

AWAY. This word seems to have been used occasionally as a verb.
Barbour.

A. S. aweg, away, may be viewed as the imperat. of awaeg-an, to take away, or awegg-an, to depart.

AWAYMENTIS, s. pl. Consultations; Gl. Perhaps preparations, or preliminaries.
Wyntown.

Perhaps from O. Fr. avoy-er, to put in train; avoyment, enquÃté, ouverture; de via; Gl. Roquefort.

AWALT SHEEP, one that has fallen backward, or downhill, and cannot recover itself, S.
V. Awail.
Gl. Sibb.

To AWANCE, v. a. To advance.

Fr. avanc-er, id.

Wallace.

AWAT, s. Ground ploughed after the first crop from lea. The crop produced is called the awat-crap, also pronounced award; Ang. Avil, Galloway, aewall, Clydes. id.

A. S. afed, pastus, af-at, depastus; or Su. G. awat, afat, deficiens; or perhaps from af-val, diminution, as the same with Awalt, q. v.

AWAWARD, s. The vanguard.
Barbour.

Fr. avantgarde.

AWBYRCHOWNE, AWBERCHEOUN, s. The habergeon, or breastplate.
Wyntown.

Franc. halsberge, Isl. halsbeorg, collare chalybeum, from hals the neck, and berga to defend; Fr. haubergeon; L. B. halberg-ium.

AWBLASTER, s.
 1. A crossbow-man, alblastere, and arblast, O. E.
Barbour.
 2. The crossbow itself; Fr. arbaleste.
Wallace.

Fr. arbelestier, L. B. arcubalista, arbalista.

AWCY, s. Perhaps, pain, torment.

A. S. ace, aece, dolor.

Sir Gawan and Sir Gol.

AWEDE, adj. In a state approaching to insanity.
Sir Tristrem.

A. S. awed-an, awoed-an, insanire.

To AWENT, v. a. To cool or refresh by exposing to the air.
Barbour.

A. S. awynd-wian, ventilare, from wind, ventus.

AWERTY, AUERTY, adj. Cautious, experienced; auerty, R. Brunne.
Barbour.

Fr. averti, warned, advertised.

AWIN, AWYN, AWNE, adj. Own, proper, S. awne; Gl. Yorks. id. This is the common pron. of the south of S.; in other parts, ain.
Wallace.

Moes. G. aigin, aihn, proprius, A. S. agen, Germ. eighen, Belg. eyghen, Su. G. egen, id. from their respective verbs denoting right or property.

AWISE, s. Manner, fashion.
V. Avyse.

AWISE, AWYSEE, adj. Prudent, considerate, cautious.
Barbour.

Fr. avisé, prudens, cautus, consideratus; deduced in Dict. Trev. from Goth. wis-an, A. S. vis-an, with ad prefixed, L. B. avisare.

AWISELY, adv. Prudently, circumspectly.
Barbour.

AWMON, HEWMON, s. A helmet.
Gl. Sibb.

AMOUS, s. A cap or cowl; a covering for the head; printed aumons.
Houlate M. S.

L. B. almuc-ia, O. Fr. aumusse, from Germ. mutze, S. mutch.

AWNIE, adj. Bearded, S.
V. Next word.
Burns.

AWNS, s. pl. The beards of corn, S.  Anes, Prov. E.
Bar awns, the beards of barley, Ang.  Perths.

Moes. G. ahana, Su. G. agn, Gr. αχνα, αχνη, chaff; Alem. agena, id.; also, a shoot or stalk.

AWP, WHAUP, s. The curlew, a bird, S.
V. Quhaip.
Gl. Sibb.

AWORTH, adv. "Worthily," Tytler.
King's Quair.

A. S. awyrth-ian, glorificare.

AWRO, Probably a wro, a corner.
Gl. Complaynt S.

Su. G. wra, pron. wro, angulus.

AWS, AWES, of a mill-wheel, s. The buckets or projections on the rims which receive the shock of the water as it falls, S.
Statist. Acc.

AWSK, s. The newt or eft.
V. Ask.

AWSOME, adj. Appaling, awful, S. B.
Rutherford.

AWSTRENE, adj. Stern, austere.
V. Asterne.
Henrysone.

Lat. auster-us, or A. S. styrn.

AWTAYNE, adj. Haughty.
Wyntown.

O. Fr. hautain, grand, sublime, elevé, Gl. Roquefort; from Lat. alt-us.

AWTER, s. An altar; Chaucer, id.

O. Fr. autiere, Lat. altare.

Barbour.

To AX, v. a. To ask, S. Asched, axede, asked; R. Glouc.
Ruddiman.

A. S. ahs-ian, ax-ian, interrogare.

AXIS, ACKSYS, s. pl. Aches, pains. Axes, id. Orkn.
King's Quair.

A. S. aece, dolor; egesa, horror; Moes. G. agis, terror.

AX-TREE, s. An axle-tree, S.

A. S. eax, ex; Alem. ahsa, Germ. achse, axis; perhaps from Isl. ak-a, to drive a chariot or dray, G. Andr.

AYONT, prep. Beyond, S.
Ross.

A. S. geond ultra, with a prefixed; or on, as afield, originally on field.


B

BAACH, a. Ungrateful to the taste.
V. Bauch.

BABIE, BAWBIE, s. A copper coin equal to a halfpenny English, S.
Knox.

Fr. bas-piece, base or billon money.

BABIE-PICKLE, s. The small grain, which lies in the bosom of a larger one, at the top of a stalk of oats, S.
V. Pickle.

BACHLANE; To Bachle.
V. Bauchle.

BACK, s. An instrument for toasting bread above the fire, made of pot-metal, S.

Germ. backen, to bake.

BACK, s. A large vat used for cooling liquors, S.

Belg. bak, a trough.

BACK, BACKING, s. A body of followers, or supporters, S.
Baillie.

BACK-BREAD, s. A kneading-trough, S.

BACK-CAST, s. A relapse into trouble, or that which is the occasion of it, S.

BACK-CAW, s. The same as Back-cast, S.

BACKE, s. The bat.
V. Bak, Backie-bird.

BACKINGS, s. pl. Refuse of wool or flax, used for coarser stuffs, S.
Statist. Acc.

Swed. bakla lin, to dress flax.

BACKLINS, s. Backwards; as, To gae backlins, to go with the face turned opposite to the course one takes, S.
V. the termination Lingis.

BACK-SEY, s.
V. Sey.

BACK-SET, s.
 1. A check, any thing that prevents growth or vegetation, S.
 2. Whatsoever causes a relapse, or throws one back in any course, S.
Wodrow.

Eng. back and set.

BACKSPANG, s. A trick, or legal quirk, by which one takes the advantage of another, after every thing seemed to have been settled in a bargain, S.

Back and spang, to spring.

To BACK-SPEIR, v. a.
 1. To trace a report as far back as possible, S.
 2. To cross-question; S.

Back and speir, to examine.

V. Spere, v.

BACK-SPEIRER, BACK-SPEARER, s. A cross-examinator, S.
Cleland.

BACK-SPRENT, s. The back-bone, S.

Back, and S. sprent, a spring.

BADE, pret. of Bide, q. v.

BADE, BAID, s.
 1. Delay, tarrying.
Wallace.
 2. Place of residence, abode.
Sibbald.

BADDERLOCK, BADDERLOCKS, s. A species of eatable fucus, S.
Lightfoot.

BADDOCK, s. Apparently the coal fish, or Gadus carbonarius, Aberd.
Statist. Acc.

BADDORDS, s. pl. Low raillery.
Ross.

BADLYNG, s. A low scoundrel.
Scot. Poems Reprinted.

Franc. baudeling, a cottager.

BADNYSTIE, s. Silly stuff.
Douglas.

Fr. badinage, id.

BADOCH, s. A marine bird of a black colour.
Sibbald.

BADRANS, BATHRONS, s. A designation for a cat, S.
Henrysone.

To BAE, v. n. To bleat, S.

BAE, s. The sound emitted in bleating, S.

Fr. bee, id.

To BAFF, v. a. To beat. S.
V. Beff.

BAFF, BEFF, s. A stroke, a blow, S.

BAGENIN, s. Indelicate toying, Fife.

BAGATY, BAGGETY, s. The female of the lump, or sea-owl, a fish, S.
Sibbald.

BAG-RAPE, s. A rope of straw, used in fastening the thatch of a roof, Ang.

BAGREL, s. A child, Dumfr.

Su. G. bagge, puer.

BAY, s. The sound caused by the notes of birds.
Douglas.

BAICH, BAICHIE, s. A child, Perths.

C. B. bachgen, Teut. bagh, puer.

Polwart.

To BAICHIE, v. n. To cough, S. B.

BAIKIE, BAKIE, s. The stake to which an ox or cow is bound in the stall, Ang.

Sw. paak, a stake.

S. Prov.

BAIKIE, BACKET, s. A square wooden vessel, for carrying coals to the fire, S.

BAIL, BAILE, BAYLE, BALL, BELE, BELLE, s.
 1. A flame, or blaze of what kind soever.
Barbour.
 2. A bonfire.
Sir Gawan.
 3. A fire kindled as a signal.
Douglas.
 4. Metaph. the flame of love.
Henrysone.

A. S. bael, Su. G. baal, a funeral pile, Isl. baal, a strong fire.

BAYLE-FYRE, s. A bonfire.

A. S. bael-fyr, the fire of a funeral pile.

BAILCH, s. A very lusty person, S. B.

V. Belch.

Ross.

BAILLE, s. A mistress.
Wallace.

Fr. belle, id.

BAILLIE, BAILIE, s.
 1. A magistrate second in rank, in a royal borough, an alderman, S.
Lyndsay.
 2. The baron's deputy in a burgh of barony, S.
Statist. Acc.

Fr. baillie, an officer, L. B. baliv-us.

BAILLIERIE, s.
 1. The extent of a bailie's jurisdiction, S.
Wodrow.
 2. The extent of a sheriff's jurisdiction.
Acts Ja. I.

BAYNE, BANE, adj.
 1. Ready, prepared, S. B.
Wallace.
 2. Alert, lively, active.
Wallace.

Isl. bein-a, expedire.

BAYNLY, adv. Readily, cheerfully.

BAYNE, "Forte, a kind of fur," Rudd.
Douglas.

BAIR, BAR, s. A boar.
Barbour.

A. S. bar, Germ. baer, Lat. verr-es, id.

BAIRD, s. A poet or bard.
Acts Ja. VI.

C. B. bardh, Gael. Ir. bard.

BAIRMAN, s. A bankrupt.
Reg. Maj.

E. bare, nudatus.

BAIRN, BARNE, s. A child, S.
Douglas.

Moes. G. barn, a child, from bair-an, ferre, gignere, A. S. bearn.

BAIRNHEID, BARNEHEID, s.
  1. The state of childhood.
Inventories.
 2. Childishness.
Dunbar.

BAYRNIS-BED, s. The matrix.
Complaynt S.

BAIRNLY, adj. Childish, S.

Sw. barnslig, puerilis.

BAIRNLINESS, s. Childishness, S.

BAIRN-TYME, BARNE-TEME, s. Brood of children, S.
Houlate.

A. S. bearn-team, liberorum sobolis procreatio.

BAIRNS-PART of Gear, that part of a father's personal estate to which his children are entitled to succeed, and of which he cannot deprive them by any testament, or other gratuitous deed to take effect after his death, S.
Stair.

BAIRNS-PLAY, s. The sport of children, S.
Rutherford.

BAIRNS-WOMAN, s. A dry nurse, S.

BAIS, adj. Having a deep or hoarse sound.

Fr. bas, E. base.

Douglas.

BAISDLIE, adv. In a state of stupefaction.
V. Bazed.
Burel.

BAISE, s. Haste, expedition, S. B.

Su. G. bas-a, citato gradu ire.

To BAISS, v. a. To sew slightly, S.

Fr. bast-ir, E. baste.

To BAIST, v. a. To overcome, S. B.

Isl. beyst-a, ferire.

BAIST, s. One who is struck by others, especially in the sports of children, S. B.

BAISTIN, s. A drubbing, S.

BAIT, s. A boat.
V. Bat.

To BAYT, v. a. To give food to.
Barbour.

Isl. beit-a, to drive cattle to pasture, beit pasture.

To BAYT, v. n. To feed.
Gl. Sibb.

BAITTLE, adj. Denoting that sort of pasture, where the grass is short and close, Selkirks.

Isl. beitinn, fit for pasture.

BAIVEE, s. A species of whiting.
Sibbald.

BAK, BACKE, BAKIE-BIRD, s. The bat or rearmouse, S.
Douglas.

Su. G. nattbacka, id.

BAKE, s. A small cake, a biscuit, S.
Burns.

BAKGARD, s. A rear-guard.
Wallace.

BAKIE, s. The black-headed gull, Orkn.

BAKIE, s. The name given to one kind of peat, S.
Ess. Highl. Soc.

E. bake, to knead.

BAKIE, s. A stake.
V. Baikie.

BAKIN-LOTCH, s. A species of bread.
Evergreen.

BAKSTER, BAXSTER, s. A baker, S.
Burrow Lawes.

A. S. baecestre, a woman-baker.

BAL, BALL, the initial syllable of a great many names of places in Scotland.

Ir. Gael. baile, ball, a place or town; Su. G. Isl. bol, id. domicilium, sedes, villa, from bo, bo-a, bu-a, to dwell, to inhabit.

BALAS, s. A sort of precious stone, said to be brought from Balassia in India.

Fr. balais, bastard ruby.

BALAX, s. A hatchet, Aberd.

Isl. bolyxe, Su. G. baalyxa, a large axe.

BALBEIS, s. pl. Halfpence.
V. Babie.
Maitland Poems.

BALD, BAULD, adj.
 1. Bold, intrepid, S.
Wyntown.
 2. Irascible, S.
Douglas.
 3. Pungent to the taste, or keenly affecting the organ of smelling, S.
 4. Keen, biting; expressive of the state of the atmosphere, S.
Davidson.
 5. Certain, assured.
Henrysone.
 6. Used obliquely, bright; as "a bald moon."
Kelly.

A. S. bald, beald, Su. G.  Alem.  Germ. bald, audax.

To BALD, v. a. To embolden.
Douglas.

BALDERRY, s. Female-handed orchis, a plant, S.
Lightfoot.

BALK and BURRAL, a ridge raised very high by the plough, and a barren space of nearly the same extent, alternately, S. B.
V. Bauk, s.
Statist. Acc.

BALDERDASH, s. Foolish and noisy talk, S.

Isl. bulldur, stultorum balbuties.

BALEN, adj. Made of skin.
V. Pauis.
Douglas.

Isl.  Su. G. baelg, Germ. balg, a skin.

BALYE, s. A space on the outside of the ditch of a fortification, commonly surrounded by strong palisades.
Spotswood.

Fr. bayle, a barricado, L. B. ball-ium.

BALLANT-BODDICE, s. Boddice made of leather, anciently worn by ladies in Scotland, S. B.
V. Balen.

BALLINGAR, BALLINGERE, s. A kind of ship.

Fr. ballinjier.

Wallace.

BALOW, s.
 1. A lullaby, S.
Ritson.
 2. A term used by a nurse, when lulling her child.
Old Song.

Fr. bas, là le loup, "be still, the wolf is coming."

BAMULLO, BOMULLOCH, To gar one lauch, sing or dance Bamullo, to make one change one's mirth into sorrow, Ang.  Perths.

C. B. bw terror, Gael. mula, mullach, gloomy brows, q. "the spectre with the dark eye-brows."

BANCHIS, s. pl. Deeds of settlement.

Ital. banco, a bank.

Dunbar.

BANCOURIS, s. pl. Coverings for stools or benches.

Teut. banckwerc, tapestry; Fr. banquier, a bench-cloth.

To BAN, BANN, v. n. Often applied in S., although improperly, to those irreverent exclamations which many use in conversation, as distinguished from cursing.
A. Douglas.

BAND (To take), to unite; a phrase borrowed from architecture.
Rutherford.

BAND, s. Bond, obligation, S.
Wyntown.
To mak band, to come under obligation, to swear allegiance.
Wallace.

BAND of a hill. The top or summit.
Douglas.

Germ. bann, summitas, Gael. ben.

BANDKYN, s. A cloth, the warp of which is thread of gold, and the woof silk, adorned with figures.
Douglas.

L. B. bandequin-us.

BANDOUNE, BANDOWN, s. Command, orders.
V. Abandon.
Wallace.

Germ. band, a standard.

BANDOUNLY, adv. Firmly, courageously.
Wallace.

BANDSTER, BANSTER, s. One who binds sheaves after the reapers in the harvest-field, S.
Ritson.

A. S. Germ. band, vinculum.

BANE, s. Bone, S.
Wyntown.

A. S. ban, Alem. bein, id.

BANE, King of Bane, the same with King of the Bean, a character in the Christmas gambols. This designation is given to the person who is so fortunate as to receive that part of a divided cake which has a bean in it; Rex fabae.
Knox.

BANE-FYER, s. A bonfire, S.
Acts Ja. VI.

Apparently corrupted from Bail-fire.

BANEOUR, BANNEOURE, s. A standard-bearer.
Barbour.

BANERER, s. Properly, one who exhibits his own distinctive standard in the field, q. "the lord of a standard."
Douglas.

Teut. bander-heer, baner-heer, baro, satrapa.

BANERMAN, s. A standard-bearer.
Wallace.

Su. G. banersman, vexillifer.

BANES-BRAKIN, s. A bloody quarrel, "the breaking of bones," S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

To BANG, v. n. To change place with impetuosity; as, to bang up, to start from one's seat or bed; to bang to the dore, to run hastily to the door, S.
Ramsay.

Su. G. baang, tumult, Isl. bang-a, to strike.

To BANG out, v. a. To draw out hastily, S.
Ross.

BANG, s.
 1. An action expressive of haste; as, He cam wi' a bang, S.
In a bang, suddenly, S.
Ross.
 2. A great number, a crowd, S.
Ramsay.

To BANG, v. n. To push off with a boat, in salmon-fishing, without having seen any fish in the channel, Aberd.
Law Case.

BANGEISTER, BANGSTER, s.
 1. A violent and disorderly person, who regards no law but his own will.
Maitland Poems.
 2. A braggart, a bully, S.
Ross.
 3. A loose woman, Clydes.

Isl. bang-a, to strike, bang-ast, to run on one with violence.

BANGSTRIE, s. Strength of hand, violence to another in his person or property.

From Bangster.

Acts Ja. VI.

BANKERS, s. pl. Apparently the same with Bancouris, q. v.

BANKROUT, s. A bankrupt.
Skene.

Fr. banquerout, Ital. bancorotto, Teut. banckrote, id.

BANNOCK, BONNOCK, BANNO, s. A cake, baked of dough in a pretty wet state, and toasted on a girdle, S.
Bannatyne Poems.

Ir. boinneog, bunna, Gael. bonnach, a cake.

Bear-bannock, s. A cake of this description, baked of barley-meal, S.
Ritson.

BANNOCK-FLUKE, s. The name given to the genuine turbot, from its flat form as resembling a cake, S.
Stat. Acc.

BANNOCK-HIVE, s. Corpulence, induced by eating plentifully, S.
V. Hive.
Morison.

BANRENTE, s. A banneret.
Acts Ja. I.

BANSTICKLE, s. The three-spined stickle-back, gasterosteus aculeatus, Linn, S.
Barry.

BANWIN, s. As many reapers as may be served by one bandster, S. Fife, S. A.

A. S. band, vinculum, and win, labor.

BAP, s.
 1. A thick cake baked in the oven, generally with yeast, whether made of oat-meal, barley-meal, flour of wheat, or a mixture, S.
Ritson.
 2. A roll, a small loaf of wheaten bread, of an oblong form, S.

BAR, s. The grain in E. called barley; bar-meal, barley-meal; bar-bread, bar-bannock, &c. S. B.

Moes. G. bar, hordeum.

BAR, s. A boar.
V. Bair.

To BAR, v. n. To bar from bourdes, apparently to avoid jesting.
Bannatyne Poems.

Fr. barr-er, to keep at a distance.

BARBAR, BARBOUR, adj. Barbarous, savage.

Fr. barbare, id.

Kennedy.

BARBER, s. What is excellent in its kind, a low term, S.

Su. G. baer-a, illustrare.

BARBLES, s. pl. A species of disease.
Polwart.

Fr. barbes, a white excrescence which grows under the tongue of a calf.

BARBLYT, part. pa. Barbed.
Barbour.

Fr. barbele, id.

To BARBULYIE, v. a. To disorder, to trouble, Perths.
Montgomery.

Fr. barbouillé, confusedly jumbled.

BARDACH, BARDY, adj.
 1. Stout, fearless, determined, S. B.
Ross.
 2. Irascible, contentious, and at the same time uncivil and pertinacious in managing a dispute, S.
R. Galloway.

Isl. barda, pugnax, bardagi, Su. G. bardaga, praelium.

BARDILY, adv.
 1. Boldly, with intrepidity, S.
 2. Pertly, S.

BARDIE, s. A gelded cat, Ang.

BARDIS, s. pl. Trappings.
Douglas.

Goth. bard, a pole-ax.

BARDYNGIS, s. pl. Trappings of horses.
Bellenden.

BARDISH, adj. Rude, insolent in language.
Baillie.

From bard, S. baird, a minstrel.

BARE, adj. Lean, meagre, S.

A. S. bare, baer, nudus.

To BARGANE, v. n. To fight, to contend.
Wallace.

Su. G. baer-ia, beargh-a, ferire, pugnare.

BARGANE, s.
 1. Fight, battle, skirmish.
Barbour.
 2. Contention, controversy, S. B.
Ross.
 3. Struggle, S. B.
Ross.

BARGANER, s. A fighter, a bully.
Dunbar.

BARGANYNG, s. Fighting.
Barbour.

To BARK, v. a. To tan leather, S.
Chalmerl. Air.

Su. G. bark-a, decorticare, barka hudar, coria glabra reddere.

BARKER, s. A tanner, S.

Dan. barker, id.

To BARKEN, v. n. To clot, to become hard; part. pa. barknyt.
Douglas.

BARKING and FLEEING, a phrase used to denote one, who, especially from prodigality, is believed to be on the eve of bankruptcy, S.

BARLA-BREIKIS, BARLEY-BRACKS, A game generally played by young people in a corn-yard, S.
Bannatyne MS.

Perh. q. breaking the barley, or parley.

BARLA-FUMMIL, BARLA-FUMBLE, An exclamation for a truce by one who has fallen down in wrestling or play.
Chr. Kirk.

Fr. parlez, foi melez, "let us have a truce, and blend our faith."

BARLEY, s. A term used in the games of children, when a truce is demanded, S.

Fr. parlez, E. parley.

BARLEY-MEN.
V. Burlaw.

BARLEY-BOX, s. A small box of a cylindrical form, now made as a toy for children, but formerly used by farmers for carrying samples of barley, or other grain to market, S.

BARLICHOOD, s. A fit of ill-humour, especially as the result of intemperance, S.
Ramsay.

From barley; as expressing the effect of any intoxicating beverage.

BARME HORS, A horse without a saddle, Ang.
Wyntown.

BARMY, adj.
 1. Volatile, giddy.
Montgomery.
 2. Passionate, choleric. "A barmy quean," a passionate woman, S.

From E. barm, yeast.

BARMKYN, BERMKYN, s. The rampart or outermost fortification of a castle.
Wallace.

Fr. barbacane; or Teut. barm, a mound, with the termination kin.

BARNAGE, s.
 1. Barons or noblemen, collectively viewed. Old Fr.
Wallace.
 2. A military company; including both chieftains and followers.
Douglas.

BARNAT, adj. Native.
Our barnat land, q. the land of our barnheid or nativity.
Wallace.

BARNE, s. The same with Barnage.

Old Fr. barnez, nobility.

Wallace.

BARNE, s. A child.
V. Bairn.

BARNE, s. Apparently for barme, bosom.
Douglas.

BARNS-BREAKING, s. Any mischievous or injurious action; in allusion to the act of breaking up a barn for carrying off corn, S.

BARRACE, BARRAS, BARRES, BARROWIS, s.
 1. A barrier, an outwork at the gate of a castle.
Wyntown.
 2. An inclosure made of felled trees for the defence of armed men.
Wallace.
 3. Lists for combatants.
Douglas.

Old Fr. barres, palaestra.

BARRAT, s.
 1. Hostile intercourse, battle.
Wallace.
 2. Contention, of whatever kind.
Dunbar.
 3. Grief, vexation, trouble.
Gawan and Gol.

Su. G.  Isl. baratta, praelium.

BARRATRIE, s. The crime of clergymen who went abroad to purchase benefices from the see of Rome for money.
Acts Ja. I.

L. B. baratria, from O. Fr. barat, deceit.

BARREL-FERRARIS.
V. Ferraris.

BARREL-FEVERS, s. pl. A term used by the vulgar, to denote the disorder produced in the body by intemperate drinking, S.

BARRIE, s. A swaddling cloth of flannel, in which the legs of an infant are wrapped for defending them from the cold, S.

BARTANE, s. Great Britain.
Bannatyne Poems.

BARTANYE, BERTANYE, s. Britanny.
Bellenden.

BARTIZAN, BERTISENE, s. A battlement on the top of a house or castle, or around a spire, S.
Statist. Acc.

O. Fr. bretesche, wooden towers used for defence, Ital. bertesca.

BASE DANCE, A kind of dance, slow and formal in its motions.
Complaynt S.

Fr. basse danse.

To BASH, v. a. To beat to sherds, Loth.  Smash synon.

Su. G. bas-a, to strike.

BASH, s. A blow, S. A.

To BASH up, v. a. To bow or bend the point of an iron instrument inwards, Loth.

BASING, BASSING, s. A bason; pl. basingis.

Fr. bassin, id.

Bellenden.

BASS.
 1. This term is used in S. for the inner bark of a tree.
 2. A mat laid at a door for cleaning the feet; also, one used for packing bales, S.

Teut. bast, cortex.

BASSIE, s. A large wooden dish, used for carrying meal from the girnal to the bakeboard, S. B.
Ross.

Fr. bassin, a bason.

BASSIE, s. An old horse, Clydes. Loth.
V. Bawsand.

BASSIL, s. A long cannon, or piece of ordnance.
Pitscottie.

Abbrev. from Fr. basilic.

BASSIN, adj. Of or belonging to rushes.
Douglas.

Teut. biese, juncus, scirpus; L. B. basse, a collar for cart-horses made of flags.

BASSNYT, adj. White-faced.
V. Bawsand.
Gl. Sibb.

BASTAILYIE, s. A bulwark, a blockhouse.
Bellenden.

Fr. bastille, a fortress, a castle furnished with towers.

BASTILE, BASTEL, s. A fortress, principally meant for securing prisoners, South of S.
V. preceding word.
Statist. Acc.

BASTOUN, s. A heavy staff, a baton.

Fr. baston, baton, id.

Douglas.

BAT, s. A staple, a loop of iron, S.

BATAILL, s.
 1. Order of battle, battle-array.
Barbour.
 2. A division of an army, a battalion.
Barbour.
 3. It seems to signify military equipment.
Barbour.

Fr. bataille, order of battle; also, a squadron, battalion, or part of an army; deduced from Germ. batt-en, caedere, A. S. beatt-an, id.

BATE, BAIT, s. A boat.
Barbour.

A. S.  Alem.  Isl. and Su. G. bat; C. B. and Ir. bad, cymba.

BATHE, BAITH, BAYTH, BAID, adj. Both, S.   Baid is the pron. of Angus.
Wyntown.

Moes. G. ba, bai, bagoth; A. S. ba, buta; Alem. bedia, bedu, beidu; Isl. and Su. G. bade; Dan. baade; Germ. beide; Belg. beyde; ambo.

BATIE, BAWTY, s. A name for a dog, without any particular respect to species; generally given, however, to those of a larger size; S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Perhaps from O. Fr. baud, a white hound; baud-ir, to excite dogs to the chace.

BATIE, BAWTIE, adj. Round and plump, applied either to man or beast, Clydesd.

BATIE-BUM, BATIE-BUMMIL, s. A simpleton, an inactive fellow.
V. Blaitiebum.
Maitland P.

From batie a dog, and bum, to make a humming noise.  Teut. bommel, a drone.

BATS, s. pl. The disease in horses called in E. the bots, S.
Polwart.

Teut. botte, papula, a swelling with many reddish pimples that eat and spread; Swed. bett, pediculi, from bit-a, mordere.

BATTALLING, BATTELLING, s. A battlement.
Douglas.

Fr. bastillé, batillé, turriculis fastigiatus.

BATTAR-AX, s. A battle-ax.
Dunbar.

Fr. battre, Ital. battar-e, to strike; also, to fight.

To BATTER, v. a. To paste, to cause one body to adhere to another by means of a viscous substance, S.

BATTER, s. A glutinous substance, used for producing adhesion, paste, S.

To BATTER, v. a. To lay a stone so as to make it incline to one side, or to hew it obliquely; a term used in masonry, S.

Fr. battre, to beat.

BATTILL-GERS. "Thick, rank, like men in order of battle," Rudd. This, however, may be the same with baittle, applied to grass that is well stocked, South of S.

Teut. bottel, and bottel-boom, denote the arbutus, or wild strawberry tree.

BATWARD, s. A boatman; literally, a boat-keeper.
Wyntown.

Isl. bat, cymba, and vard, vigil, Swed. ward, custodia.

BAVARD, adj. Worn out, in a state of bankruptcy.
Baiver and baiver-like, are used in S. to signify shabby in dress and appearance.
V. Bevar.
Baillie.

Fr. bavard, baveur, a driveller; also, a babbler.

BAUBLE, s. A short stick, with a head carved at the end of it like a poupée, or doll, carried by the fools of former times.
Lord Hailes.

Fr. babiole, a toy, a gewgaw.

BAUCH, BAUGH, BAACH, (gutt.) adj.
 1. Ungrateful to the taste. In this sense waugh is now used, S.
Polwart.
 2. Not good, insufficient in whatever respect, S. as "a baugh tradesman," one who is far from excelling in his profession.
Ramsay.
Bauch-shod, a term applied to a horse, when his shoes are much worn, S.
 3. Indifferent, sorry, not respectable, S.
Ramsay.
 4. Not slippery. In this sense ice is said to be bauch, when there has been a partial thaw. The opposite is slid or gleg, S.

Isl. bag-ur, reluctans, renuens; bage, jactura, nocumentum (offals); baga, bardum et insulsum carmen.

BAUCHLY, adv. Sorrily, indifferently, S.
Ramsay.

BAUCHNESS, s. Want, defect of any kind, S.

To BAUCHLE, BAWCHYLL, BACHLE, (gutt.) BASHLE, v. a.
 1. To wrench, to distort, to put out of shape; as "to bauchle shoon," to wear shoes in so slovenly a way as to let them fall down in the heels, S.
Journ. London.
 2. To treat contemptuously, to vilify.
Wallace.
Bashel may be allied to Fr. bossel-er, to bruise.

Isl. backell, luxatus, valgus, shambling, biag-a violare, whence biag-adr luxatus, membrorum valetudine violatus.

BAUCHLE, BACHEL, s.
 1. An old shoe, used as a slipper, S.
 2. Whatsoever is treated with contempt or disrespect. To mak a bauchle of any thing, to use it so frequently and familiarly, as to shew that one has no respect for it, S.
Ferguson's Prov.

BAUGIE, s. An ornament; as, a ring, a bracelet.
Douglas.

Teut. bagge gemma; Isl. baug-r; Alem. boug, A. S. beag, Fr. bague, Ital. bagun, annulus.

BAUK, BAWK, s.
 1. One of the cross-beams in the roof of a house, which support and unite the rafters, S.
 2. The beam by which scales are suspended in a balance, S.

Teut. balck waeghe, a balance.  We invert the term, making it weigh-bauks.

Germ. balk, Belg. balck, Dan. bielke, a beam.

BAUK, BAWK, s. A strip of land left unploughed, two or three feet in breadth, S.
Statist. Acc.

A. S. and C. B. balc, Su. G. balk, porca, a ridge of land between two furrows; Isl. baulkur, lira in agro, vel alia soli eminentia minor.

BAUKIE, s. The razorbill, Alca torda, Orkn.
Barry.

BAUSY, adj. Big, strong.
Dunbar.

Su. G. basse, vir potens.

To BAW, v. a. To hush, to lull.
Watson.

Fr. bas, low.

V. Balow.

BAW, s.
 1. A ball, used in play, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Money given to school-boys by a marriage company, to prevent their being maltreated; as otherwise they claim a right to cut the bride's gown, S.  This is the same with Ball money, E.
V. Coles.

Corr. from E. ball.

BAWAW, s. An oblique look, implying contempt or scorn, S. B.
Ross.

BAWBIE, s. A half-penny.
V. Babie.

BAWBURD, s. The larboard, or the left side of a ship.
Douglas.

Fr. bas-bord; Isl. batforda, id.

BAWD, s. A hare, Aberd.
Poems Buchan Dial.

A. S. Ir. and Gael, miol denotes a beast of whatever kind, miol bhuide, or boide, is a hare; also patas.

BAWD-BREE, s. Hare-soup, Aberd.

BAWDEKYN, s. Cloth of gold.

Fr. baldachin, baldaquin, baudequin, L. B. baldachinum, tissue de fil d'or.

To BAWME, v. a.
 1. To embalm.

Fr. em-baum-er.

Wyntown.
 2. To cherish, to warm.
Douglas.

BAWSAND, BASSAND, BAWSINT, adj.
 1. Having a white spot on the forehead or face; a term applied to a horse, cow, &c., S.
Douglas.
 2. It seems to be used as equivalent to brindled or streaked, S. A.
Minstrelsy Bord.

Hence, it would seem, bassie, an old horse, S.

Fr. balzan, balsan, a horse that has a white mark on the feet; deduced from Ital. balzano, and this from Lat. bal-ius, a horse that has a white mark either on the forehead or feet.  Germ. blaesse, Su. G. blaes, a white mark on the forehead of a horse.  Hence perhaps E. blazon, and blaze.

BAWSY-BROWN, s. A hobgoblin; viewed as the same with Robin Goodfellow of England, and Brownie of S.
Bannatyne Poems.

Perhaps from Su. G. basse, vir potens, V. Bausy, or base, spectrum, and brun, fuscus, q. the strong goblin of a brown appearance.

BAXTER, s. A baker, S.
V. Bakster.
Ramsay.

BAZED, BASED, BASIT, part. pa.
Watson's Coll.
Maitland Poems.

Teut. baes-en, delirare; Belg. byse, bysen, turbatus; Su. G. bes-a denotes the state of animals so stung by insects, that they are driven hither and thither; Fr. bez-er, id.

BE, prep.
 1. By, as denoting the cause, agent, or instrument, S.
Barbour.
 2. Towards, in composition; as, be-east, towards the east; be-west, towards the west, S.
Wyntown.
3. Of, concerning; as, be the, concerning thee.
Wallace.
 4. By the time that.
Diallog.
 5. During, expressive of the lapse of time.
Keith.

A. S. be, per; de; circa.

Be than, by that time.

BE, part. pa. Been.
Douglas.

To BEAL.
V. Beil.

BEANSHAW.
V. Benshaw.

To BEAR, BER, BERE, v. a. To bear on hand, to affirm, to relate.
Wyntown.

To bear upon, to restrain one's self, S. B.
Ross.

BEAR, BERE, s. Barley, having four rows of grains, S.  Hordeum vulgare, Linn.
Wyntown.

A. S. bere, Moes. G. bar, hordeum.

BEAR LAND, land appropriated for a crop of barley, S.
To go through the bear land with one, to tell him all the grounds of umbrage at his conduct, to pluck a crow with him, S.

BEARIS BEFOR, Ancestors.
Wallace.

A translation of Lat. antecessores.

BEARANCE, s. Toleration, S.
J. Nicol.

BEAT, s. A stroke, a blow, a contusion, S. B. apparently the same with Byt used in this sense by Douglas.

To BEBBLE, v. a.
 1. To swallow any liquid in small, but frequent draughts; whether the liquor be intoxicating or not, S.
 2. To tipple, v. n. "He's ay bebbling and drinking;" he is much given to tippling, S.

It seems to be formed from Lat. bibere to drink, in the same manner as bibulus, soaking, drinking, or taking it wet.

BECHT, part. pa. Tied; Gl. Rudd.

Germ. bieg-en, flectere, is probably the origin.

To BECK, BEK, v. s.
 1. To make obeisance, to cringe, S.
Bannatyne Poems.
 2. To curtsy; as restricted to the obeisance made by a woman, and contra-distinguished from bowing.

Isl. beig-a, Germ. bieg-en, to bow.

BECK, BEK, s. A curtsy, S.
Maitland Poems.

BEDDY, adj. Expressive of a quality in grey-hounds; the sense uncertain.
Watson's Coll.

It may signify, attentive to the cry of the huntsman. Fr. baudé, "a cry as of hounds, Breton;" Cotgr.  It may, however, be the same word which occurs in the S. Prov.; "Breeding wives are ay beddie;" Kelly, p. 75. "Covetous of some silly things," N.  In this sense it is probably allied to Isl. beid-a, A. S. bidd-an, Moes. G. bid-jan, Belg. bidd-en, to ask, to supplicate, to solicit.

BEDE, pret. Offered; from the v. Bid.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

Chaucer uses the v. Bede as signifying to offer.

A. S. baed, obtulit, from beodan.

BEDELUIN, part. pa. Buried, hid under ground.
Douglas.

A. S. bedelfen, sepultus, infossus; be-delf-an, circumfodere.

BEDENE, BY DENE, adv.
 1. Quickly, forthwith.
Barbour.
 2. It seems also to signify, besides, moreover; in addition, as respecting persons.
Gawan and Gol.
 3. It undoubtedly signifies, in succession, or "one after another."
Gawan and Gol.

As belyve, very similar in sense, is undoubtedly the imperat. of belif-an, q. wait, stay; bedene may have been formed in the same manner, from Germ. bedien-en, to serve, to obey.

BEDIS, s. pl. Prayers.
King's Quair.

Germ. bed-en; Germ. ge-bet, prayer.  Hence O. E. bidde, and the phrase, to bidde prayers, to ask, to solicit them.

BEDE-HOUSE, s. A term used for an alms-house, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

BEDE-MAN, BEIDMAN, s.
 1. A person who resides in a bede-house, or is supported from the funds appropriated for this purpose, S.
Statist. Acc.
 2. In the Court of Exchequer, this term is used to denote one of that class of paupers who enjoy the royal bounty. The designation has originated from some religious foundation, in times of popery. Bedman occurs in O. E.
V. Assoilyie, sense 3.

The origin is A. S. bead, a prayer.  Hence, says Verstegan, the name of Beads, "they being made to pray on, and Beadsman."

BEDYIT, part. pa. Dipped.
Douglas.

A. S. deag-an, tingere.

BEDOYF, part. pa. Besmeared, fouled.
Douglas.

Su. G. doft, dupt, pulvis; or A. S. bedof-en, submersus, dipped.

BEDOWIN, part. pa.
Douglas.

Rudd. expl. bedowyne, besmeared, deriving it from Belg. bedauwen, to bedew, or sprinkle.

BEDRAL, s. A person who is bedrid.
V. Orphelin.

BEDREL, adj. Bedrid, Galloway.
Douglas.

Corr. perhaps from A. S. bedrida, id.; Teut. bedder, clinicus, Germ. bed-reise.

BEDUNDER'D, part. pa. Stupified, confounded, S. q. having the ear deafened by noise.

Su. G. dundr-a, Belg. dender-en, tonare, to thunder.

BEE, s. The hollow between the ribs and hip-bone of a horse, S. B.

Perhaps from A. S. bige, byge, flexus, angulus, sinus; big-an, byg-ean, flectere, curvare.

BEE-ALE, s. A species of beer, or rather mead, made from the refuse of honey; S. B. This in Clydes. is called swats.

BEE-BREAD, s. The substance that goes to the formation of bees, S.

A. S. beo-bread signifies honeycomb.

BE-EAST, Towards the East.
V. Be, prep.

BEELDE, BELD, s. "Properly an image.—Model of perfection or imitation." Gl. Wynt.
Wyntown.

A. S. bilith, bild, Belg. beeld, beld, Sw. bild, imago.

To BEENGE, BYNGE, v. a. To cringe, in the way of making much obeisance, S.
V. Beck.
Ferguson.

This is undoubtedly from A. S. bens-ian, also written boens-ian, to ask as a suppliant; supplicitor petere, orare; bensiende, supplicans.

BEENJIN, improperly written, is expl. "fawning."
J. Nicol.

BEEVIT, part. pa. Perhaps, installed as a knight.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. befeht, cinctus, girded, Somn.

V. Falow.

To BEFF, BAFF, v. a. To beat, to strike, S.
Beft, beaten, pret. and part. pa.
Douglas.

It is used more simply, as referring to the act of beating with strokes; applied to metal.
Douglas.

Doun Beft signifies, beat down, overthrown.

BEFF, BAFF, s. A stroke.
V. Baff.

BEFORN, prep. Before.
Wallace.
It occurs also in O. E.
R. Brunne.

A. S. beforan, ante; coram.

BEFOROUTH, adv. Before, formerly.
V. Forowth.
Barbour.

BEFT, part. pa. Beaten.
V. Beff.

To BEGARIE, v. a.
 1. To variegate, to deck with various colours.
Lyndsay.
 2. To stripe, to variegate with lines of various colours, to streak. Begaryit, striped, part. pa.
Douglas.
 3. To besmear; to bedaub, to bespatter. "S. begaried, bedirted;" Rudd. vo. Laggerit.
Lyndsay.

This v. has an evident affinity to our Gair, gare, a stripe of cloth, and Gaired, gairy, q. v.  The word is immediately allied to Fr. begarr-er, to diversify; begarré, of sundry colours, mingled.

BEGAIRIES, s. pl. Stripes or slips of cloth sewed on garments, by way of ornament, such as are now worn in liveries; pessments, S. synon.
Acts Ja. VI.

BEGANE, part. pa. Covered; Gold begane, overlaid with gold.
Douglas.

Aurea tecta, Virg. According to Rudd. q. gone over.  Chaucer uses the phrase, With gold begon, Rom. Rose, 943., "painted over with gold," Tyrwh.

To BEGECK, BEGAIK, BEGEIK, v. a. To deceive; particularly by playing the jilt, S.B.
Dunbar.

Teut. gheck-en, deridere, ludibrio habere.

V. Geck.

BEGEIK, BEGINK, BEGUNK, s.
 1. A trick, or illusion, which exposes one to ridicule, S.
Ramsay.
 2. It often denotes the act of jilting one in love; applied either to a male, or to a female, S.
Begeik is the more common term, S. B.
Morison.

BEGES, BEGESS, adv. By chance, at random.
Evergreen.

From be, by, and gess, guess, Belg. ghisse.

BEGGER-BOLTS, s. pl. "A sort of darts or missile weapons. The word is used by James VI. in his Battle of Lepanto, to denote the weapons of the forceats, or galley-slaves." Gl. Sibb. Hudson writes beggers' bolts.

The word may have originated from contempt of the persons, who used these arms, q. bolts of beggars.

BEGOUTH, BEGOUDE, pret. Began.
Wyntown.
Begoud is now commonly used, S.

A. S. gynn-an, beginn-an, seem to have had their pret. formed like eode, from gan, ire: Beginnan, begeode.

BEGRAUIN, part. pa. Buried, interred.
Douglas.

A. S. graf-an, fodere; Teut. be-gra-ven, sepelire.

BEGRETTE, pret. Saluted.
Douglas.

A. S. gret-an, Belg. be-groet-en, salutare.

BEGRUTTEN, part. pa. Having the face disfigured with weeping, S.

Sw. begratande, bewailing.

V. Greit.

BEGUILE, s. A deception, trick, the slip; sometimes a disappointment, S.
Ross.

BEGUNKIT, part. adj. Cheated, Clydes.
V. Begeck.

To BEHALD, v. a.
 1. To behold, S. behaud.
Wyntown.
 2. To have respect to, to view with favour or partiality.
Douglas.

Spectat, Virg.  A. S. beheald-an.

3. To wait, to delay; q. to look on for a while, S. used both as an active, and as a neuter verb.
Ross.
Behold occurs in the same sense.
Baillie.

BEHAUYNGIS, s. pl. Manners, deportment.
Bellenden.

Mores, Boeth.

V. Havings.

To BEHECHT, v. n. To promise.
Douglas.

Chaucer, behete, A. S. behaet-an, id. R. Glouc. behet; R. Brunne, be-hette, promised.

BEHECHT, BEHEST, BEHETE, s.
 1. Promise.
Bellenden.
 2. Engagement, covenant.
Douglas.
 3. Command.
Douglas.

Chaucer, beheste, id.

BEHO, BOHO, s. A laughing-stock. "To mak a boho" of any thing, to hold it up to ridicule, S. B.

Alem. huohe, ludibrium.

To BEHUFE, v. n. To be dependent on.
Douglas.

A. S. behof-ian, Belg. behoev-en, to stand in need of, egere, opus habere.

BEJAN CLASS, a designation given to the Greek class in the Universities of St Andrew's and Aberdeen; as, till of late, in that of Edinburgh. Hence, the students in this class are denominated Bejans.

Fr. bejaune, a novice, an apprentice, a young beginner in any science, art, or trade.  Cotgr. derives bejaune from bec jaulne, literally a yellow beak or bill.  Du Cange observes that L. B. bejaunus signifies a young scholar of any university, and bejaunium the festivity that is held on his arrival.  The term is thus very emphatic, being primarily used in relation to a bird newly hatched, whose beak is of a deep yellow.

To BEJAN, v. a. When a new shearer comes to a harvest-field, he is initiated by being lifted by the arms and legs, and struck down on a stone on his buttocks; Fife. This custom has probably had its origin in some of our universities. It is sometimes called horsing.

BEIK, s. A hive of bees.
V. Byke.

To BEIK, BEKE, BEEK, v. a.
 1. To bask, S.
Barbour.
 2. To warm, to communicate heat to.
Ramsay.
 3. It is often used in a neuter sense, S.
Ywaine.

Belg. baeker-en is used in the same sense; baeker-en een kindt, to warm a child.  We say, To beik in the sun; so, Belg. baekeren in de sonne.  But our word is more immediately allied to the Scandinavian dialects; Su. G. bak-a, to warm.

BEIK, adj. Warm.
Bannatyne Poems.

BEIK, s.
 1. This word primarily signifying the beak or bill of a fowl, is "sometimes used for a man's mouth, by way of contempt;" Rudd.
Douglas.
 2. It is used, as a cant word, for a person; "an auld beik," "a queer beik," &c. S.

Belg. biek, Fr. bec, rostrum.  It may be observed that the latter is metaph. applied to a person.

V. Bejan.

To BEIL, BEAL, v. n.
 1. To suppurate, S.
Maitland Poems.
 2. To swell or rankle with pain, or remorse; metaph. applied to the mind, S. B.
Ross.
Wodrow.

Belg. buyl-en, protuberare?  Ihre derives Su. G. bold, a boil, from Isl. bolg-a, intumescere.

BEILIN, s. A suppuration, S.

BEILD, BIELD, s.
 1. Shelter, refuge, protection, S.
Gawan and Gol.

"Every man bows to the bush he gets bield frae;" S. Prov.  Every man pays court to him who gives him protection.

 2. Support, stay, means of sustenance, S.
Douglas.
 3. A place of shelter; hence, applied to a house, a habitation; S.
Morison.

A. Bor. beild, id.

Beilding also occurs, where it seems doubtful whether buildings or shelter be meant.
Gawan and Gol.

Isl. baele denotes both a bed or couch, and a cave, a lurking place; cubile, spelunca.  It is highly probable, that baele is radically the same with Isl. boele, domicilium, habitatio; from bo, to build, to inhabit.

To BEILD, v. a.
 1. To supply, to support.
Wallace.
 2. In one passage it seems to signify, to take refuge; in a neuter sense.
Gawan and Gol.

This verb, it would seem, has been formed from the noun, q. v., or has a common origin with Isl. bael-a, used to denote the act of causing cattle to lie down.

BEILDY, adj. Affording shelter.
Ramsay.

BEILD, adj. Bold.
Houlate.

A. S. beald, id.  A. S.  Alem. belde, audacia.

BEILL, s. Perhaps, sorrow, care, q. baill.
Bannatyne Poems.

BEIN, s. Bone, Ang.

One is said to be aw frae the bein, all from the bone, when proud, elevated, or highly pleased; in allusion, as would seem, to the fleshy parts rising from the bone, when the body is swollen.

BEIN, BEYNE, adj. Beinlier.
V. Bene.

BEIR, BERE, BIR, BIRR, s.
 1. Noise, cry, roar.
Douglas.
The word is used in this sense by R. Glouc.
 2. Force, impetuosity; often as denoting the violence of the wind, S.  Vir, virr, Aberd.
Douglas.

O. E. bire, byre, birre.  The term, especially as used in the second sense, seems nearly allied to Isl. byre (tempestas), Su. G. boer, the wind; which seem to acknowledge byr-ia, boer-ia, surgere, as their root.

To BEIR, BERE, v. s. To roar, to make a noise.
Wallace.

Teut. baeren, beren, is expl. by Kilian; Fremere, sublatè et ferociter clamare more ursorum. The learned writer seems thus to view it as a derivative from baere, bere, a bear.

BEIRD, s. A bard, a minstrel.
V. Baird.
Douglas.

BEYRD, pret. Laid on a bere.
Maitland Poems.

From A. S. baer, baere, feretrum.

BEIRTH, BYRTHE, s. Burden, incumbrance, charge; Gl. Sibb.

Dan. byrde, byrth; Isl. byrd; Su. G. boerd-a; Belg. borde, A. S. byrth-in; from Moes. G. bair-an, Su. G. baer-a, to bear.

BEIS, v. s. Be, is; third p. sing. subj. S.
Douglas.

Here the second pers. is improperly used for the third.  A. S. byst, sis; Alem.  Franc. bist, es, from bin, sum; Wachter, vo. Bin.

BEIS, BEES, One's head is said to be in the bees, when one is confused or stupified with drink or otherwise, S.
Shirrefs.

Teut. bies-en, aestuari, furente impetu agitari; or from the same origin with Bazed, q. v.

BEIST, BEISTYN, s. The first milk of a cow after she has calved, S. biestings, E.

A. S. beost, byst; Teut. biest, biest melck, id. (colostrum).

To BEIT, BETE, BEET, v. a.
 1. To help, to supply; to mend, by making addition.
Henrysone.
To beit the fire, or beit the ingle. To add fuel to the fire, S. "To beet, to make or feed a fire." Gl. Grose.
To beit a mister, to supply a want, Loth.
 2. To blow up, to inkindle, applied to the fire.
Douglas.
 3. To bring into a better state, by removing calamity or cause of sorrow.
Wallace.

A. S. bet-an, ge-bet-an, to mend, to restore to the original state; Belg. boet-en; Isl. bet-a, Su. G. boet-a, id. boet-a klaeder, to repair or mend clothes.  A. S. bet-an fyr, corresponds to the S. phrase mentioned above, struere ignem.

Bett, part. pa. Supplied.
Wallace.

BEIT, s. An addition, a supply, S. B.
V. the v.

BEITMISTER, s. That which is used in a strait, for supplying any deficiency; applied either to a person or to a thing; Loth.
V. Beit, v. and Mister.

To BEKE, v. a. To bask.
V. Beik.

BEKEND, part. Known; S. B. bekent.
Douglas.

Germ. bekaunt, id. Teut. be-kennen, to know; A. S. be-cunnan, experiri.

BELCH, BAILCH, BILCH, s. (gutt.)
 1. A monster.
Douglas.
 2. A term applied to a very lusty person, S. B.
"A bursen belch, or bilch, one who is breathless from corpulence, q. burst, like a horse that is broken-winded.
Ross.

Teut. balgh, the belly; or as it is pron. bailg, Moray, from Su. G. bolg-ia, bulg-ia, to swell.

BELD, adj. Bald, without hair on the head, S.
V. Bellit.
Burns.

Seren. derives it from Isl. bala, planities.  With fully as much probability might it be traced to Isl. bael-a, vastare, prosternere, to lay flat.

BELD, s. Pattern, model of perfection.
V. Beelde.

BELD, imperf. v. Perhaps, took the charge of, or protected.
Houlate.

Fr. bail, a guardian.  In this sense it is nearly allied to E. bailed, Fr. bailler, to present, to deliver up.  As, however, we have the word beild, shelter, protection, beld may possibly belong to a verb corresponding in sense.

BELD CYTTES, s. pl. Bald coots.
Houlate.

The bald coot receives its name from a bald spot on its head.  It is vulgarly called bell-kite, S.

BELDIT, part. pa. Imaged, formed.
V. Beelde.
Houlate.

Belg. beeld-en, Germ. bild-en, Sw. bild-a, formare, imaginari.  A. S. bild, bilith, Germ.  Sw. bild, belaete, an image.

To BELE, v. s. "To burn, to blaze."
Wyntown.

This, however, may mean, bellowed, roared, from A. S. bell-an, Su. G. bal-a, id.  Chaucer uses belle in the same sense.

BELE, s. A fire, a blaze.
V. Bail.

To BELEIF, v. a. To leave; pret. beleft.

A. S. be and leof-an, linquere.

Douglas.

To BELEIF, BELEWE, v. a. To deliver up.
Douglas.
It is also used as a v. n. with the prep. of.
Barbour.

A. S. belaew-an, tradere; belaewed, traditus.

BELEFE, s. Hope.
Douglas.

To BELENE, v. n. To tarry; or perhaps, to recline, to rest.
Sir Gawan.

A. S. bilen-ed, inhabited.

V. Leind.

Or allied to Germ. len-en, recumbere.

BELEWYT, imperf. v. Delivered up.
V. Beleif, v. 2.

BELGHE, s. Eructation, E. belch.
Z. Boyd.

BELYVE, BELIFF, BELIUE, BELIFE, adv.
 1. Immediately, quickly.
Douglas.
 2. By and by, S.
Barbour.
This seems to be the only modern sense of the term in S.
 3. At length.
Douglas.
 4. It is used in a singular sense, S. B. Litle belive, or bilive, a small remainder.
Popular Ball.

Chaucer belive, blive, quickly; Gower, blyve, id.  Hickes mentions Franc. belibe, as signifying protinus, confestim; and Junius refers to Norm. Sax. bilive.  This is certainly the same word; from Alem. and Franc. belib-an, manere; A. S. belif-an, id.

To BELY, v. a. To besiege.
Spotswood.

TO BELL THE CAT, to contend, with one, especially, of superior rank or power; to withstand him, either by words or actions; to use strong measures, without regard to consequences, S.
Godscroft.

Fr. Mettre la campane au chat, "to begin a quarrel, to raise a brabble; we say also, in the same sense, to hang the bell about the cat's neck." Cotgr.

To BELLER, v. n. To bubble up.
Bp. Galloway.

Isl. belg-ia, inflare buccas.

BELL-PENNY, s. Money laid up, for paying the expence of one's funeral; from the ancient use of the passing-bell. This word is still used in Aberbrothick.

BELL-KITE, s. The bald Coot.
V. Beld Cyttes.

BELLAN, s. Fight, combat.
Douglas.

Lat. bellum.

BELLE, s. Bonfire.
V. Bail.

BELLING, s. The state of desiring the female; a term properly applied to harts.
Douglas.

Rudd. derives the phrase from Fr. belier, a ram; but perhaps it is rather from Isl. bael-a, bel-ia, baul-a, Germ. bell-en, mugire, boare.

BELLIS, s. pl.
Wallace.

BELLIT, adj. Bald.
Fordun.
Scotichron.

BELLY-BLIND, s. The play called Blind-man's buff, S. A.: Blind Harie, synon. S.
Anciently this term denoted the person who was blindfolded in the game.
Lyndsay.

In Su. G. this game is called blind-bock, i. e. blind goat; and in Germ. blinde kuhe, q. blind cow.  It is probable, that the term is the same with Billy Blynde, mentioned in the Tales of Wonder, and said to be the name of "a familiar spirit, or good genius."

BELLY-FLAUGHT.
 1. To slay, or flay, belly-flaught, to bring the skin overhead, as in flaying a hare, S. B.
Monroe's Iles.
 2. It is used in Loth. and other provinces, in a sense considerably different; as denoting great eagerness or violence in approaching an object.
Ramsay.
 3. It is also rendered, "flat forward."
J. Nicol.

BELLY-HUDDROUN.
V. Huddroun.

BELLY-THRA, s. The colic.
Gl. Complaynt.

A. S. belg, belly, and thra, affliction.  This term, I am informed, is still used on the Border.

To BELLWAVER, v. n.
 1. To straggle, to stroll, S.
 2. To fluctuate, to be inconstant; applied to the mind, S.

I am informed, however, that the pronunciation of the term in some places in the west of S. is bullwaver; and that it is primarily applied to a bull when going after the cow, and hence transferred to man, when supposed to be engaged in some amorous pursuit.

The origin of the latter part of the v. is obvious; either from E. waver or L. B. wayviare, to stray.  Perhaps the allusion may be to a ram or other animal, roaming with a bell hung round its neck.

To BELT, v. a.
 1. To gird, S.
Hence, in our old ballads belted knights are often introduced.
 2. To gird, metaph. used in relation to the mind.
Bellenden.
 3. To surround, to environ in a hostile manner.
Bellenden.

Isl. belt-a, cingere zona.

To BELT, v. a. To flog, to scourge, S.

To BELT, v. n. To come forward with a sudden spring, S.

Isl. bilt-a, bilt-ast, signifies, to tumble headlong.

BELT, part. pa. Built.
Douglas.

BELTANE, BELTEIN, s. The name of a sort of festival observed on the first day of May, O. S.; hence used to denote the term of Whitsunday.
Peblis to the Play.

This festival is chiefly celebrated by the cow-herds, who assemble by scores in the fields, to dress a dinner for themselves, of boiled milk and eggs.  These dishes they eat with a sort of cakes baked for the occasion, and having small lumps in the form of nipples, raised all over the surface.  The cake seems to have been an offering to some Deity in the days of Druidism.—In Ireland, Beltein is celebrated on the 21st June, at the time of the solstice.  There, as they make fires on the tops of hills, every member of the family is made to pass through the fire; as they reckon this ceremony necessary to ensure good fortune through the succeeding year.—The Gael. and Ir. word Beal-tine or Beil-tine signifies Bel's Fire; as composed of Baal or Belis, one of the names of the sun in Gaul, and tein signifying fire.  Even in Angus a spark of fire is called a tein or teind.

BELTH, s.
Douglas.

This word may denote a whirlpool or rushing of waters.   I am inclined, however, to view it, either as equivalent to belch, only with a change in the termination, metri causa; or as signifying, figure, image, from A. S. bilith, Alem. bilid, bileth, id.

To BEMANG, v. a. To hurl, to injure; to overpower, S. B.
Minstrelsy Border.

To BEME, v. n.
 1. To resound, to make a noise.
Douglas.
 2. To call forth by sound of trumpet.
Gawan and Gol.

Germ. bomm-en, resonare; or A. S. beam, bema, tuba.  It is evident that beme is radically the same with bommen, because Germ. bomme, as well as A. S. beam, signifies a trumpet.

BEME, s. A trumpet; Bemys, pl.
Gawan and Gol.

O. E. beem, id.

V. the v.

BEMYNG, s. Bumming, buzzing.
Douglas.

BEN, adv.
 1. Towards the inner apartment of a house; corresponding to But, S.
Wyntown.
It is also used as a preposition, Gae ben the house, Go into the inner apartment.

A But and a Ben, S.; i. e. a house containing two rooms.
Statist. Acc.

 2. It is used metaph. to denote intimacy, favour, or honour. Thus it is said of one, who is admitted to great familiarity with another, who either is, or wishes to be thought his superior; He is far ben. "O'er far ben, too intimate or familiar," Gl. Shirr.
Lyndsay.
 3. Leg. as in edit. 1670, far ben.

A. S. binnan, Belg. binnen, intus, (within); binnen-kamer, locus secretior in penetralibus domus; Kilian.  Belg. binnen gaan, to go within, S. to gae ben; binnen brengen, to carry within, S. to bring ben.

BEN-END, s.
 1. The ben-end of a house, the inner part of it, S.
 2. Metaph., the best part of any thing; as, the ben-end of one's dinner, the principal part of it, S. B.

BEN-HOUSE, s. The inner or principal apartment, S.

BENNER, adj. A comparative formed from ben. Inner, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

BENMOST is used as a superlative, signifying innermost.
Ferguson.

Teut. binnenste is synon.

BEN-INNO, prep. Within, beyond, S. B.
Journal Lond.

From ben, q. v. and A. S. inne, or innon, within; Alem. inna; Isl. inne, id.

There-ben, adv. Within, in the inner apartment, S.
V. Thairben.

BEND, s.
 1. Band, ribbon, or fillet; pl. bendis.
Douglas.
"Bend, a border of a woman's cap, North.; perhaps from band," Gl. Grose.
 2. It is used improperly for a fleece.
Douglas.

A. S. bend, baende, Moes. G. bandi, Germ. band, Pers. bend, vinculum.

To BEND, v. n. To drink hard; a cant term, S.
Ramsay.

BEND, s. A pull of liquor, S.
Ramsay.

BENDER, s. A hard drinker, S.
Ramsay.

BENE, v. subst. Are.
Bellenden.

Chaucer, ben, id. from beon, third p. pl. subj. of the A. S. substantive verb.

BENE is also used for be.
King's Quair.

BENE, BEIN, BEYNE, BIEN, adj.
 1. Wealthy, well-provided, possessing abundance, S.
Henrysone.

This is perhaps the most common sense of the term, S.  Thus we say, A bene or bein farmer, a wealthy farmer, one who is in easy, or even in affluent circumstances; a bein laird, &c.

 2. Warm, genial. In this sense it is applied to a fire, S.
Douglas.
 3. Pleasant.
Douglas.
 4. Happy, blissful, S.
Ferguson.
 5. Splendid, showy.
Wallace.
 6. Good, excellent in its kind.
Dunbar.
 7. Eager, new-fangled. People are said to be bein upon any thing that they are very fond of, Loth. In this sense bayne occurs in O. E.

Isl. bein-a signifies to prosper, to give success to any undertaking.  Bein, as allied to this, signifies hospitable; beine, hospitality, hospitis advenae exhibita beneficentia.  G. Andr. mentions the v. beina, as signifying, hospitii beneficia praestare.  Beini, hospitality, liberality.

BENELY, BEINLY, adv. In the possession of fulness, S.
L. Scotland's Lament.

BENE, adv. Well; full bene, full well.
Douglas.

This word is most probably from Lat. benè, well.

BENJEL, s. A heap, a considerable quantity; as "a benjel of coals," when many are laid at once on the fire, S. B. Bensil, however, is used in the same sense in the South and West of S.
V. Bensell.

BENK, BINK, s. A bench, a seat. It seems sometimes to have denoted a seat of honour.
Kelly.

Dan. benk, Germ. bank, scamnum; Wachter.

BENN, s. A sash.
V. Bend.
Statist. Acc.

BENORTH, prep. To the northward of; besouth, to the southward of, S.
Wyntown.

BENSELL, BENSAIL, BENT-SAIL, s.
 1. Force, violence of whatever kind, S.
Douglas.
 2. A severe stroke; properly that which one receives from a push or shove, S.
 3. "A severe rebuke," Gl. Shirr. "I got a terrible bensell;" I was severely scolded, S.
 4. Bensil of a fire, a strong fire, South and West of S.

It is not unlikely that the word was originally bent-sail, as alluding to a vessel driven by the force of the winds.

To BENSEL, v. a. To bang, or beat, Gl. Sibb. "Bensel, to beat or bang. Vox rustica, Yorksh." Gl. Grose.

BENSHAW, BEANSHAW, s. A disease, apparently of horses.
Polwart.

Formed perhaps from A. S. ban, Teut. been, os, and hef, elevatio; q. the swelling of the bone.

BENSHIE, BENSHI, s. Expl. "Fairy's wife."
Pennant.

It has been observed, that this being, who is still reverenced as the tutelar daemon of ancient Irish families, is of pure Celtic origin, and owes her title to two Gaelic words, Ben and sighean, signifying the head or chief of the fairies.  But it seems rather derived from Ir. Gael. ben, bean a woman, said by Obrien to be the root of the Lat. Venus, and sighe, a fairy or hobgoblin.

BENT, s.
 1. A coarse kind of grass, growing on hilly ground, S. Agrostis vulgaris, Linn. Common hair-grass.
 2. The coarse grass growing on the sea-shore, S. denoting the Triticum juncium, and also the Arundo arenaria.
Lightfoot.
 3. The open field, the plain, S.
Douglas.
 4. To gae to the bent, to provide for one's safety, to flee from danger, by leaving the haunts of men; as it is also vulgarly said, to tak the cuntrie on his back.
Henrysone.

Teut. biendse; Germ. bintz, bins, a rush, juncus, scirpus; a binden, vincire, quia sportas, sellas, fiscellas, et similia ex juncis conteximus; Wachter.

BENTY, BENTEY, adj. Covered with bent-grass, S.
Monroe's Iles.

To BER on hand.
V. Bear.

BERBER, s. Barberry, a shrub.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gol.

L. B. berberis, Sw. id.

BERE, s. Noise; also, To Bere.
V. Beir.

BERE, s. Boar.
V. Bair.
Douglas.

BERE, s. Barley.
Wyntown.

BERGLE, BERGELL, s. The wrasse, a fish, Orkn.
Barry.

The first syllable of its name is undoubtedly from Isl. berg, a rock.  Had it any resemblance to the eel, we might suppose the last from aal, q. the rock eel.

BERHEDIS, s. pl. Heads of boars.
V. Bere.
Gawan and Gal.

BERIT, imperf.
V. Beir, v.

To BERY, BERYSS, BERISCH, v. a. To inter, to bury.
Douglas.

A. S. byrig-an, id.  Junius says that A. S. byrig-an is literally, tumulare.  It may, however, be supposed that the primitive idea is found in Isl. birg-ia, Franc. berg-an, to cover, to hide, to defend.

BERIIS, s. Sepulture.

A. S. byrigels, sepultura.  Birielis is accordingly used by Wiclif for tombs.

BERYNES, BERYNISS, s. Burial, interment.
Barbour.

A. S. byrignesse, sepultura.

BERY BROUNE, a shade of brown approaching to red.
Gawan. and Gol.

We still say, "as brown as a berry," S.  A. S. beria, bacca.

BERLE, s. Beryl, a precious stone.
Houlate.

From this s. Doug. forms the adj. beriall, shining like beryl.

BERLY, adj. Apparently, strong, mighty.
Henrysone.

This word is the same, I suspect, with E. burly, strong.  If berly be the ancient word, either from Germ. bar, vir illustris; or from baer, ursus; especially as Su. G. biorn, id. was metaph. used to denote an illustrious personage.

BERN, BERNE, s.
 1. A baron.
Wallace.
 2. It is often used in a general sense, as denoting a man of rank or authority; or one who has the appearance of rank, although the degree of it be unknown.
Gawan and Gol.
 3. A man in general.
Douglas.

A. S. beorne, princeps, homo, Benson; "a prince, a nobleman, a man of honour and dignity," Somner. Bern, as denoting a man, in an honourable sense, may be from A. S. bar, free, or Lat. baro, used by Cicero, as equivalent to a lord or peer of the realm.

BERN, s. A barn, a place for laying up and threshing grain.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. bern, id.  Junius supposes that this is comp. of bere, barley, and ern, place, q. "the place where barley is deposited," Gl. Goth.

BERSIS, s. "A species of cannon formerly much used at sea. It resembled the faucon, but was shorter, and of a larger calibre," Gl. Compl.
Complaynt S.

Fr. barce, berche, "the piece of ordnance called a base;" Cotgr. pl. barces, berches.

BERTH, s. Apparently, rage.
Wyntown.

Isl. and Sw. braede, id.

BERTHINSEK, BIRDINSEK, BURDINSECK. The law of Berthinsek, a law, according to which no man was to be punished capitally for stealing a calf, sheep, or so much meat as he could carry on his back in a sack.
Skene.

A. S. ge-burthyn in saeca, a burden in a sack; or from ge-beor-a, portare.

BERTYNIT, BERTNYT, pret. and part. pa. Struck, battered.
Wallace.

This is evidently the same with Brittyn, q. v.

BESAND, BEISAND, s. An ancient piece of cold coin, offered by the French kings at the mass of their consecration at Rheims, and called a Bysantine, as the coin of this description was first struck at Byzantium or Constantinople. It is said to have been worth, in French money, fifty pounds Tournois.
Kennedy.

To BESEIK, v. a. To beseech, to entreat.
Douglas.

A. S. be and sec-an, to seek; Belg. ver-soek-en, to solicit, to entreat; Moes. G. sok-jan, to ask, used with respect to prayer.

BESY, adj. Busy.
Wyntown.

A. S. bysi, Belg. besigh, id.; allied perhaps to Teut. byse turbatus, bijs-en, violento impetu agitari.

BESYNES, s. Business.
Wyntown.

BESYNE, BYSENE, BYSIM, s. Expl. "whore, bawd," Gl. Sibb.
V. Bisym.

BESCHACHT, part. pa.
 1. Not straight, distorted, Ang.
 2. Torn, tattered; often including the idea of dirtiness, Perths. The latter seems to be an oblique use.
V. Shacht.

To BESLE, or BEZLE, v. n. To talk much at random, to talk inconsiderately and boldly on a subject that one is ignorant of, Ang.

Belg. beuzel-en, to trifle, to fable; Teut. beusel-en, nugari.

BESLE, BEZLE, s. Idle talking, Ang.

Belg. beusel, id.

BESMOTTRIT, part. pa. Bespattered, fouled.
Douglas.

A. S. besmyt-an, maculare, inquinare; Belg. besmodder-en, Germ. schmader-n, schmatter-n, to stain, S. to smadd, Su. G. smitt-a.

BESOUTH, prep. To the southward of.
V. Benorth.

BEST, part. pa. Struck, beaten.
V. Baist.
Barbour.

BEST, part. pa. Perhaps, fluttering, or shaken.
Barbour.

Isl. beyst-i, concutio.

BEST, s. "Beast, any animal not human," Gl. Wynt.
Wyntown.

The term is still used in this general sense, S. pronounced q. baist.  S. B.

BEST-MAN, s. Brideman; as best-maid is bride-maid; from having the principal offices in waiting on the bride, S.

BESTIAL, (off Tre) s. An engine for a siege.
Wallace.

It seems uncertain, whether this word be formed from Lat. bestialis, as at first applied to the engines called rams, sows, &c., or from Fr. bastille, a tower; L. B. bastillae.

BESTIALITÉ, s. Cattle.
Complaynt S.

L. B. bestialia, pecudes; Fr. bestail.

BESTREIK, part. pa. Drawn out; gold bestreik, gold wire or twist.
Burel.

Teut. be-streck-en, extendere.

BESTURTED, part. pa. Startled, alarmed, afrighted, S.

Germ. besturz-en, to startle; besturzt seyn, to be startled.  Ihre views Isl. stird-r, rigid, immoveable, as the root.

BESWAKIT, part. pa. Apparently, soaked, drenched.
Dunbar.

Isl. sock, mergor, saukv-a, mergi.

To BESWEIK, v. a. To allure; to beguile; to deceive.

A. S. swic-an, beswic-an, Isl. svik-ia.  Alem. bisuich-en, Su. G. swik-a, Germ. schwick-en, id.

BET, pret. Struck.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. beat-an, Su. G. bet-a; tu bete, thou hast struck.

BET, BETT, pret. and part. Helped, supplied.
V. Beit.

BET, part. pa. Built, erected.
Douglas.

This is a secondary and oblique sense of the v. Beit, q. v.

BET, adj. Better.
King's Quair.

A. S. bet, Teut. bat, bet, melius, potius, magis; Alem. bas, baz, melior, the compar. of bat, bonus.  A. S. bet-an, emendare, and the other synon. verbs in the Northern languages, have been viewed as originating the term.  Bet, indeed, seems to be merely the past part., mended, i. e. made better.

BETANE, part. pa. Perhaps, inclosed.
Barbour.

A. S. betien-en, betyn-an, to inclose, to shut up.

BETAUCHT, BETUK, Delivered, committed in trust; delivered up.
V. Betech.

To BETECH, BETEACH, v. a. To deliver up, to consign; betuk, pret. betaucht, pret. and part. pa.
Barbour.

Hence "the common Scots expression, God I beteach me till," Rudd.; and that used by Ramsay, Betootch-us-to; i. e.  Let us commend ourselves to the protection of some superior being.  O. E. bitoke, committed; also bitaughten, bitakun, bitauht.  A. S. betaec-an, tradere, concedere, assignare, commendare; to deliver, to grant, to assign or appoint, to betake or recommend unto; Somner.  Betaehte, tradidit.

BETHLERIS. Leg. Bechleris. Bachelors.
Houlate.

To BETRUMPE, v. a. To deceive.
Douglas.

To BETREYSS, BETRASE, v. a. To betray.
Barbour.

Betrasit, Douglas; betraissed, Wallace; betraised, Chaucer; betraist, R. Brunne.  Germ. trieg-en, betrieg-en; Fr. trah-ir, id. trahi-son, treason.

BETWEESH, prep. Betwixt, S.
V. Atweesh.

BEVAR, s. One who is worn out with age.
Henrysone.

It is evidently from the same source with Bavard, adj. q. v.  We still say a bevir-horse for a lean horse, or one worn out with age or hard work; S.

BEVEL, s. A stroke; sometimes, a violent push with the elbow, S.
Many.

This is a derivative from Baff, beff, q. v.

BEVEREN, BEVERAND, part. pr.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

Perhaps from A. S. befer-an, circumdare; or as the same with beverand, which Sibb. renders "shaking, nodding;" deriving it from Teut. bev-en, contremere.  This is a provincial E. word.  "Bevering, trembling. North." Gl. Grose.

BEVIE, (of a fire) s. A term used to denote a great fire; sometimes, bevice, S.

Perhaps from E. bavin, "a stick like those bound up in faggots," Johnson.  It is thus used in O. E.

BEVIE, s. A jog, a push, S. from the same source with bevel.
V. Baff, s.

BEVIS.
V. Bevar.

BEUCH, s. (gutt.) A bough, a branch, S.
Douglas.

A. S. boga, boh, id. from bug-an, to bend.

BEUCHIT, part. pa. (gutt.) Bowed, crooked, S
Douglas.

A. S. bug-an, curvare.

BEUGH, s. (gutt.) A limb, a leg, Border.
Evergreen.

Isl. bog, Alem. puac, Germ. bug, id.  The term is applied both to man and to other animals.  Both Ihre and Wachter view bug-en, to bend, as the origin; as it is by means of its joints that an animal bends itself.

BEUGLE-BACKED, adj. Crook-backed.
Watson.

A. S. bug-an, to bow; Teut. boechel, gibbus.  Germ. bugel, a dimin. from bug, denoting any thing curved or circular.  It is undoubtedly the same word that is now pronounced boolie-backit, S.

BEUKE, pret. v. Baked.
Douglas.

A. S. boc, pret. of bac-an, pinsere.

BEULD, adj. Bow-legged, Ang.; q. beugeld from the same origin with beugle, in Beugle-backed, q. v.

BEW, adj. Good, honourable. Bew schyris, or schirris, good Sirs.

Fr. beau, good.

Douglas.

To BEWAVE, BEWAUE, v. a. To cause to wander or waver.
Palice of Honour.

A. S. waf-ian, vacillare, fluctuare.

BEWIS, BEWYS, s. pl. Boughs.
V. Beuch.
Douglas.

BEWIS, s. pl. Beauties.

O. Fr. beau, beauty.

Maitland Poems.

BEWITH, s. A thing which is employed as a substitute for another, although it should not answer the end so well.
Ramsay.
One who arrives, when the regular dinner is eaten, is said to get "only a bewith for a dinner," S.

From the subst. v. conjoined with the prep., q. what one must submit to for a time.

To BEWRY, v. a. To pervert, to distort.
Douglas.

Teut. wroegh-en, torquere, angere.

BY, prep.
 1. Beyond, S.
Pitscottie.
 2. Besides, over and above.
Pitscottie.
 3. Away from, without, without regard to, contrary to.
Wallace.

By, as thus used, is sometimes directly contrasted with be, as signifying by in the modern sense of the term.  This may be viewed as an oblique sense of by as signifying beyond; perhaps in allusion to an arrow that flies wide from the mark.

4. In a way of distinction from, S.
Wallace.

BY, adv. When, after; q. by the time that.
Pitscottie.

This idiom is very ancient, Moes. G. Bi the galithun thai brothrjus is; When his brethren were gone up.

BY-HAND, adv. Over, S.
V. Hand.

BY-LYAR, s. A neutral.
Knox.

From the v. To lie by, E.

BIAS, a word used as a mark of the superlative degree; bias bonny, very handsome; bias hungry, very hungry, Aberd.

BIB, s. A term used to denote the stomach, Ang., borrowed, perhaps, from the use of that small piece of linen, thus denominated, which covers the breast or stomach of a child.

BYBILL, s. A large writing, a scroll so extensive that it may be compared to a book.
Detection Q. Mary.

The word occurs in a similar sense in O. E.  As used by Chaucer, Tyrwhitt justly renders it "any great book."   In the dark ages, when books were scarce, those, which would be most frequently mentioned, would doubtless be the Bible and Breviary.  Or, this use of the word may be immediately from L. B. biblus, a book, (Gr. βιβλος), which occurs in this sense from the reign of Charlemagne downwards.

BICHMAN, s. Perhaps, for buthman, q. boothman, one who sells goods in a booth.
Dunbar.

In edit. 1508, it is buthman.

BYCHT.
V. Lycht.
Houlate.

BICK, s. A bitch; "the female of the canine kind," S.

A. S. bicca, bicce, id.; Isl. bickia, catella.

To BICKER, BYKER, v. a. This v., as used in S., does not merely signify, "to fight, to skirmish, to fight off and on," as it is defined in E. dictionaries. It also denotes,
 1. The constant motion of weapons of any kind, and the rapid succession of strokes, in a battle or broil.
Wallace.
 2. To fight by throwing stones; S.
 3. To move quickly; S.
 4. It expresses the noise occasioned by successive strokes, by throwing of stones, or by any rapid motion; S.

C. B. bicre, a battle; "Pers. pykar." id. Gl. Wynt.

BICKER, BIKERING, s.
 1. A fight carried on with stones; a term among schoolboys, S.
 2. A contention, strife, S.
Baillie.

BICKER, BIQUOUR, s. A bowl, or dish for containing liquor; properly, one made of wood; S.
Evergreen.

Germ. becher; Isl. baukur, bikare; Sw. bagare; Dan. begere; Gr. and L. B. βεικαρι, baccarium; Ital. bicchiere, patera, scyphus.

To BID, v. a.
 1. To desire, to pray for.
Henrysone.

This sense is common in O. E.

 2. To care for, to value.
Douglas.

From the same origin with Bedis, q. v.

To BIDE, BYDE, v. a.
 1. To await, to wait for.
Kelly.
 2. To suffer, to endure. "He bides a great deal of pain;" S. Westmorel, id.
Ross.

An oblique sense of Moes. G. beid-an, A. S. bid-an, expectare.

To BIDE be, v. n. To continue in one state, S.

BIDINGS, s. pl. Sufferings.
V. Bide, v.

BY-EAST, towards the east.
V. Be, prep.

BIERDLY, BIERLY, adj.
Popular Ball.

It is viewed as the same with Burdly, q. v.  But to me it seems rather to signify, fit, proper, becoming, from Isl. byr-iar, ber, decet, oportet.

BIERLING, s. A galley, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

BIG, BIGG, s. A particular species of barley, also denominated bear, S. Cumb. id. barley.
Statist. Acc.

Isl. bygg, hordeum, Dan. byg, Su. G. biugg, id.

To BIG, BYG, v. a. To build; S., Cumb., Westmorel., id.
Wallace.

This word occurs in O. E. although not very frequently.  A. S. bycg-an, Isl. bygg-ia, Su. G. bygg-a, aedificare, instruere, a frequentative from bo, id.; as it is customary with the Goths thus to augment monosyllables in o; as sugg-a from so, a sow.

BIGGAR, s. A builder, one who carries on a building.
Acts Marie.

BIGGING, BYGGYN, BYGGYNGE, s. A building; a house, properly of a larger size, as opposed to a cottage, S.
Wallace.

Biggin, a building, Gl.  Westmorel.  Isl. bigging, structura.

BIGGIT, part. pa. Built.

This word is used in various senses, S.

Biggit land, land where there are houses or buildings, contrasted with one's situation in a solitude, or far from any shelter during a storm, S.
Barbour.
Weill biggit, well-grown, lusty.
Melvill's MS.
A weill biggit body is one who has acquired a good deal of wealth, S. B.

BIGGIT, pret. Perhaps, inclined.

A. S. byg-an, flectere.

King Hart.

BIGLY, BYGLY, adj. Commodious, or habitable.
Bludy Serk.

From A. S. big-an, habitare, and lic, similis.

BIGHTSOM, adj. Implying an easy air, and, at the same time, activity, S. B.
Morison.

Perhaps q. buxom, from A. S. bocsum flexibilis; byg-an, to bend.

BIGONET, s. A linen cap or coif.
Ramsay.

From the same origin with E. biggin, "a kind of coif, or linen-cap for a young child;" Phillips.  Fr. beguin. id.

BYGANE, BIGANE, BYGONE, adj.
 1. Past; S. The latter is mentioned by Dr Johnson as "a Scotch word."
Acts Ja. I.
 2. Preceding; equivalent to E. predeceased.
Douglas.

BYGANES, BIGONES, used as s. pl. denoting what is past, but properly including the idea of transgression or defect.
 1. It denotes offences against the sovereign, or the state, real or supposed.
Baillie.
 2. It is used in relation to the quarrels of lovers, or grounds of offence give by either party, S.
Morison.
 3. It often denotes arrears, sums of money formerly due, but not paid, S.
Wodrow.

BIGS, Barbour, xix. 392. Pink. ed. Leg. Lugis.

BIKE, BYKE, BEIK, s.
 1. A building, an habitation, S.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. A nest or hive of bees, wasps, or ants, S.
Douglas.
 3. A building erected for the preservation of grain; Caithn.
Pennant.
 4. Metaph. an association or collective body; S.
Lyndsay.
To skail the byke, metaph. to disperse an assembly of whatever kind; S.

Isl. biik-ar denotes a hive, alvear; and Teut. bie-bock, bie-buyck, apiarium, alvearium, Kilian.  The Isl. word is probably from Su. G. bygg-a, to build, part. pa. bygdt; q. something prepared or built.  There seems to be no reason to doubt that the word, as used in sense 2, is the same with that denoting a habitation. For what is a byke or bee-bike, but a building or habitation of bees?

BYK, Apparently, an errat. for byt, bite.
Dunbar.

BYKAT, BEIKAT, s. A male salmon; so called, when come to a certain age, because of the beak which grows in his under jaw; Ang.

BILBIE, s. Shelter, residence; Ang.

This, I apprehend, is a very ancient word.  It may be either from Su. G. byle, habitaculum, and by, pagus, conjoined, as denoting residence in a village; or more simply, from Bolby, villa primaria; from bol, praedium, and by, a village.  Thus bolby would signify a village which has a praedium, or territory of its own, annexed to it.

BILEFT, pret. Remained, abode.
Sir Tristrem.

A. S. belif-an, superesse, to remain; Alem. bilib-en, Franc, biliu-en, manere; Schilter.

BILGET, adj. Bulged, jutting out.
Douglas.

Su. G. bulg-ia, to swell, whence Isl. bylgia, a billow.  Or, Isl. eg belge, curvo; belgia huopta, inflare buccas.

To BILL, v. a. To register, to record.
Bp. Forbes.

BILLIE, BILLY, s.
 1. A companion, a comrade.
Minstrelsy Border.
 2. Fellow, used rather contemptuously, S. synon. chield, chap.
Shirrefs.
 3. As a term expressive of affection and familiarity; S.
Ramsay.
 4. A lover, one who is in suit of a woman.
Evergreen.
Still used in this sense, S. B.
 5. A brother, S.
Minstrelsy Border.
 6. Apparently used in allusion to brotherhood in arms, according to the ancient laws of chivalry.
Minstrelsy Border.
 7. A young man. In this sense it is often used in the pl. The billies, or, the young billies, S. B.
It is expl. "a stout man, a clever fellow," Gl. Shirr.

 8. Sometimes it signifies a boy, S. B. as synon. with callan.
Ross.

It is probably allied to Su. G. Germ. billig, Belg. billik, equalis; as denoting those that are on a footing as to age, rank, relation, affection, or employment.

BILLIT, adj. "Shod with iron," Rudd. Billit ax.
Douglas.

This phrase is perhaps merely a circumlocution for the bipennis, or large ax.

V. Balax.

BILTER, s. A child, Dumfr.; Isl. pilter, puellus.

BIN, s. A mountain, S. O.
Galloway.

From Gael. ben, id., Lomond bin, being synon. with Benlomond.

BIND, BINDE, s.
 1. Dimension, size; especially with respect to circumference. A barrel of a certain bind, is one of certain dimensions, S.; hence Barrell bind.
Acts Ja. III.
 2. It is used more generally to denote size in any sense.
Acts Marie.
 3. Metaph. to denote ability. "Aboon my bind" beyond my power. This is often applied to pecuniary ability; S.

This use of the word is evidently borrowed from the idea of binding a vessel with hoops.

BINDLE, s. The cord or rope that binds any thing, whether made of hemp or of straw; S.

Su. G. bindel, a headband, a fillet, from bind-as, to bind.  Teut. bindel, ligamen.

BINDWOOD, s. The vulgar name for ivy, S.; Hedera helix, Linn.; pron. binwud.

Denominated, perhaps, from the strong hold that it takes of a wall, a rock, trees, &c. q. the binding wood.  It is probably the same which is written benwood.

Statist. Acc.

BING, s.
 1. A heap in general.
Lyndsay.
 2. A heap of grain, S.
Douglas.
 3. A pile of wood; immediately designed as a funeral pile.
Douglas.
 4. "A temporary inclosure or repository made of boards, twigs, or straw ropes, for containing grain or such like;" Gl. Sibb., where it is also written binne.

Dan. bing, Sw. binge, Isl. bing-r, cumulus.

To BYNGE, v. n. To cringe.
V. Beenge.

To BINK, v. a. To press down, so as to deprive any thing of its proper shape. It is principally used as to shoes, when, by careless wearing, they are allowed to fall down in the heels; S.

O. Teut. bangh-en, premere, in angustum cogere.  Sw. bank-a, to beat, seems allied; q. to beat down.

BINK, s.
 1. A bench, a seat; S. B.
Priests of Peblis.
 2. A wooden frame, fixed to the wall of a house, for holding plates, bowls, spoons, &c. Ang.  It is also called a Plate-rack; S.
Colvil.

BINK, s. A bank, an acclivity, S. B.
Evergreen.

Wachter observes that Germ. bank, Su. G. baenk, denote any kind of eminence.

V. Benk.

BINWEED.
V. Bunwede.

BYPTICIT, part. pa. Dipped or dyed.

Lat. baptizo.

Houlate.

BIR, BIRR, s. Force.

I find that Isl. byr, expl. ventus ferens, is deduced from ber-a, ferre; Gl. Edd. Saem.
V. Beir.

BIRD, BEIRD, BRID, BURD, s.
 1. A lady, a damsel.
Gawan and Gol.

As bridde is the word used by Chaucer for bird, it is merely the A. S. term for pullus, pullulus.  Bird, as applied to a damsel, appears to be the common term used in a metaph. sense.

 2. Used, also metaph., to denote the young of quadrupeds, particularly of the fox.
V. Tod's Birds.

BYRD, v. imp. It behoved, it became.
Barbour.

A. S. byreth, pertinet.  This imp. v. may have been formed from byr-an, ber-an, to carry, or may be viewed as nearly allied to it.  Hence bireth, gestavit; Germ. berd, ge-baerd, id., sich berd-en, gestum facere.  Su. G. boer-a, debere, pret. borde, anciently boerjade.

BIRDING, s. Burden, load.
V. Birth, Byrth.
Douglas.

A. S. byrthen, Dan. byrde, id.

BIRD-MOUTH'D, adj. Mealy-mouth'd, S.
Ramsay.

BYRE, s. Cowhouse, S. Byer, id. Cumb.
Gawan and Gol.

Perhaps allied to Franc. buer, a cottage; byre, Su. G. byr, a village; Germ. bauer, habitaculum, cavea; from Su. G. bo, bu-a, to dwell.  Or from Isl. bu, a cow; Gael. bo, id.

BIRK, s. Birch, a tree; S. Betula alba, Linn.
Douglas.

A. S. birc, Isl. biorki, Teut. berck, id.

To BIRK, v. n. To give a tart answer, to converse in a sharp and cutting way; S.

A. S. birc-an, beorc-an, to bark, q. of a snarling humour.

Hence,

BIRKIE, adj. Tart, in speech, S.

BIRKY, s.
 1. A lively young fellow; a person of mettle; S.
Poems Buchan Dial.
 2. Auld Birky, "In conversation, analogous to old Boy," Gl. Shirr.
Ramsay.

Allied perhaps to Isl. berk-ia, jactare, to boast; or biarg-a, opitulari, q. one able to give assistance.

BIRKIN, BIRKEN, adj. Of, or belonging to birch; S.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. beorcen, id.

To BIRL, BIRLE, v. a.
 1. This word primarily signifies the act of pouring out, or furnishing drink for guests, or of parting it among them.
Douglas.
 2. To ply with drink.
Minst. Border.
 3. To drink plentifully, S.
Douglas.
 4. To club money for the purpose of procuring drink. "I'll birle my bawbie," I will contribute my share of the expence; S.
Ramsay.

In Isl. it is used in the first sense; byrl-a, infundere, miscere potum.  In A. S. it occurs in sense third, biril-ian, birl-ian, haurire.  Hence byrle, a butler. Isl. byrlar, id.  Birle, O. E. has the same signification.

To BIRL, v. n.
V. Birr, v.

BIRLAW-COURT, also BIRLEY-COURT.
V. Burlaw.

BIRLEY-OATS, BARLEY-OATS, s. pl. A species of oats, S.
Statist. Acc.

It seems to have received its name from its supposed resemblance to barley.

BIRLIE, s. A loaf of bread; S. B.

BIRLIN, s. A small vessel used in the Western Islands.
Martin.

Probably of Scandinavian origin, as Sw. bars is a kind of ship; and berling, a boat-staff, Seren.  I am informed, however, that in Gael. the word is written bhuirlin.

To BIRN, v. a. To burn.
V. Bryn.

BIRN, BIRNE, s. A burnt mark; S.
Acts Charles II.
Skin and Birn, a common phrase, denoting the whole of any thing, or of any number of persons or things; S.
from A. S. byrn, burning.
Acts Marie.

BIRN, s. A burden, S. B.
Ross.
To gie one's birn a hitch, to assist him in a strait, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

An abbreviation of A. S. byrthen, burden; if not from C. B. biorn, onus, byrnia, onerare; Davies.

BIRNIE, BYRNIE, s. A corslet, a brigandine.
Douglas.

A. S. byrn, byrna, Isl. bryn, brynia, Sw. bringa, thorax, lorica, munimentum pectoris; probably from Isl. bringa, pectus.

BIRNS, s. pl. Roots, the stronger stems of burnt heath, which remain after the smaller twigs are consumed; S.

A. S. byrn, incendium.

Pennycuik.

BIRR, s. Force.
V. Beir.

To BIRR, v. n. To make a whirring noise, especially in motion; the same with birle, S.
V. Beir, s.
Douglas.

To Birl, v. n.
 1. To "make a noise like a cart driving over stones, or mill-stones at work." It denotes a constant drilling sound, S.
Popular Ball.
 2. Used improperly, to denote quick motion in walking, Loth.

Birl seems to be a dimin. from the v. Birr, used in the same sense, formed by means of the letter l, a common note of diminution.

BIRS, BIRSE, BYRSS, BIRSSIS, s.
 1. A bristle, "a sow's birse," the bristle of a sow, S.
Evergreen.
 2. Metaph. for the beard.
Knox.
 3. Metaph. for the indication of rage or displeasure. "To set up one's birss," to put one in a rage. The birse is also said to rise, when one's temper becomes warm, in allusion to animals fenced with bristles, that defend themselves, or express their rage in this way, S
Course of Conformitie.

A. S. byrst, Germ. borst, burst, Su. G. borst, id.  Ihre derives it from burr, a thistle.  Sw. saettia up borsten, to put one in a rage; borsta sig, to give one's self airs, E. to bristle up.

Birssy, adj.
 1. Having bristles, rough, S.
Douglas.
 2. Hot-tempered, easily irritated, S.
 3. Keen, sharp; applied to the weather. "A birssy day," a cold bleak day, S. B.

To BIRSE, BIRZE, BRIZE, v. a.
 1. To bruise, S.
Watson.
Palice of Honour.

Brise is common in O. E.

2. To push or drive; to birse in, to push in, S.
Shirrefs.

A. S. brys-an, Belg. brys-en; Ir. bris-im; Fr. bris-er, id.

BIRSE, BRIZE, s. A bruise, S.

To BIRSLE, BIRSTLE, BRISSLE, v. a.
 1. To burn slightly, to broil, to parch by means of fire; as, to birsle pease, S.
Douglas.
 2. To scorch; referring to the heat of the sun, S.
Douglas.
 3. To warm at a lively fire, S. A. Bor. brusle, id.

Su. G. brasa, a lively fire; whence Isl. brys, ardent heat, and bryss-a, to act with fervour, ec breiske, torreo, aduro; A. S. brastl, glowing, brastlian, to burn, to make a crackling noise.

BIRSLE, BRISSLE, s. A hasty toasting or scorching, S.

BIRTH, BYRTH, s. Size, bulk, burden.
V. Burding.
Douglas.

Isl. byrd, byrth-ur, byrth-i, Dan. byrde, Su. G. boerd, burden; whence byrding, navis oneraria.  The origin is Isl. ber-a, Su. G. baer-a, A. S. ber-an, byr-an, portare.

BIRTH, s. A current in the sea, caused by a furious tide, but taking a different course from it, Orkn. Caithn.
Statist. Acc.

Isl. byrdia, currere, festinare, Verel.; as apparently signifying a strong current.

BY-RUNIS, s. pl. Arrears.
Skene.

This is formed like By-ganes, q. v.

BYRUNNING, part. pr. Waved.
Douglas.

Moes. G. birinn-an, percurrere.

BISHOPRY, s. Episcopacy, government by diocesan bishops.
Apologet. Relation.

A. S. biscoprice, episcopatus.

BISHOP'S FOOT. It is said, The Bishop's foot has been in the broth, when they are singed, S.

This phrase seems to have had its origin in times of Popery, when the clergy had such extensive influence, that hardly any thing could be done without their interference.  A similar phrase is used A. Bor. "The bishop has set his foot in it, a saying in the North, used for milk that is burnt-to in boiling."

BISKET, s. Breast.
V. Brisket.

BISM, BYSYME, BISNE, BISINE, s. Abyss, gulf.
Douglas.

Fr. abysme, Gr. αβυσσος.

BISMAR, BYSMER, s. A steelyard, or instrument for weighing resembling it; sometimes bissimar, S. B., Orkn.
V. Pundlar.
Barry.

Isl. bismari, besmar, libra, trutina minor; Leg. West Goth. bismare, Su. G. besman; Teut. bosemer, id. stater; Kilian.  G. Andr. derives this word from Isl. bes, a part of a pound weight.

BISMARE, BISMERE, s.
 1. A bawd.
Douglas.
 2. A lewd woman, in general.
Douglas.

"F. ab A. S. bismer, contumelia, aut bismerian, illudere, dehonorare, polluere," Rudd.

BISMER, s. The name given to a species of stickle-back, Orkn.
Barry.

BISMING, BYISMING, BYISNING, BYSENING, BYSYNT, adj. Horrible, monstrous.
V. Byssym.
Douglas.

BYSPRENT, part. pa. Besprinkled, overspread.
Douglas.

Belg. besprengh-en, to sprinkle.

BISSARTE, BISSETTE, s. A buzzard, a kind of hawk.
Acts Ja. II.

Germ. busert, Fr. bussart, id.

To BYSSE, BIZZ, v. n. To make a hissing noise, as hot iron plunged into water, S.
Douglas.

Belg. bies-en, to hiss like serpents.

BISSE, BIZZ, s. A hissing noise, S.
Ferguson.

BYSSYM, BYSYM, BESUM, BYSN, BISSOME, BUSSOME, BYSNING, s.
 1. A monster.
Houlate.
 2. A prodigy, something portentous of calamity.
Knox.
 3. Bysim is still used as a term highly expressive of contempt for a woman of an unworthy character, S.
V. Bisming.

Mr Macpherson, vo. Bysynt, mentions A. S. bysmorfull, horrendus.  Isl. bysmarfull has the same sense; bysna, to portend; bysn, a prodigy, grande quod ac ingens, G. Andr.

BISTAYD, BISTODE, pret. Perhaps, surrounded.
Sir Tristrem.

A. S. bestod, circumdedit, from bestand-an, Teut. besteen, circumsistere, circumdare.

BYSTOUR, BOYSTURE, s. A term of contempt; the precise meaning of which seems to be lost.
Polwart.

Several similar terms occur, as Fr. bistorié, crooked, boister, to limp; bustarin, a great lubber.

BIT, s. A vulgar term used for food, S.
Bit and baid, meat and clothing, S. B.
Ross.

Although baid be understood of clothing, I suspect that it, as well as bit, originally signified food, from A. S. bead, a table.

BYT, s. The pain occasioned by a wound.
Douglas.

A. S. byt, morsus, metaph. used.

BYTESCHEIP, s. A contemptuous term, meant as a play on the title of Bishop.
Semple.

BITTILL, s. A beetle, a heavy mallet, especially one used for beating clothes.
Houlate.

To BYWAUE, v. a. To cover, to hide, to cloak.
Douglas.

A. S. bewoef-an, Moes. G. biwaib-jan, id.

To BIZZ, v. n. To hiss. V. Bysse.

To BIZZ, BIZZ about, v. n. To be in constant motion, to bustle, S.

Su. G. bes-a, a term applied to beasts which, when beset with wasps, drive hither and thither; Teut. bies-en, bys-en, furente ac violento impetu agitari, Kilian.

BLA, BLAE, adj. Livid; a term frequently used to denote the appearance of the skin when discoloured by a severe stroke or contusion, S.
Douglas.

Su. G. blaa, Isl. bla-r, Germ. blaw, Belg. blauw, Franc. plauu, lividus, glaucus.

To BLABBER, BLABER, BLEBER, v. n. To babble, to speak indistinctly.
R. Bruce.

Teut. blabber-en, confuse et inepte garrire, Jun. vo. Blab.

Hence,

BLABERING, s. Babbling.
Douglas.

BLACKAVICED, adj. Dark of the complexion, S. from black and Fr. vis, the visage.
Ramsay.

BLACK-BOYDS, s. pl. The name given to the fruit of the bramble, West of S.

BLACK-BURNING, adj. Used in reference to shame, when it is so great as to produce deep blushing, or to crimson the countenance, S.
Ramsay.

Su. G. Isl. blygd, shame, blushing; blygd-a, to blush; q. the burning of blushes.

BLACK-COCK, s. The Heath-cock, black Game, S. Tetrao tetrix, Linn. V. Penn. Zool. p. 266. Tetrao seu Urogallus minor.—Gallus palustris Scoticus, Gesn. Nostratibus, the Black cock. Sibb. Scot. p. 16.
V. Capercailye.

BLACK FISH, fish when they have recently spawned.
V. Reid Fische.

BLACK-FISHING, s. Fishing for salmon, under night, by means of torches, S.
V. Leister.
Statist. Acc.

BLACK-FOOT, s. A sort of matchmaker; one who goes between a lover and his mistress, endeavouring to bring the fair one to compliance, S. pronounced black-fit; synon. Mush, q. v.

BLACK-HEAD, s. The Powit-gull, Shetl.
Neill.

BLACK-MAIL.
V. Mail.

BLACK PUDDING.
V. Mart.

BLACK SPAUL, a disease of cattle, S.
Essays Highl. Soc.

BLAD, BLAUD, s. A large piece of any thing, a considerable portion, S. expl. "a flat piece of any thing," Gl. Burns.
Polwort.

"A blad of bread," is a large flat piece. "I gat a great blad of Virgil by heart;" I committed to memory a great many verses from Virgil.

To ding in blads, to drive in pieces.
Melville's MS.

This word, as perhaps originally applied to food, may be from A. S. blaed, fruit of any kind; blaed, bled, also denoted pot-herbs; Ir. bladh, a part; bladh-am, I break.

Blads and dawds, is still the designation given to large leaves of greens boiled whole, in a sort of broth, Aberd. Loth.

BLAD, s. A person who is of a soft constitution; whose strength is not in proportion to his size or looks; often applied to a young person, who has become suddenly tall, but is of a relaxed habit, S. B.

Allied, perhaps, to A. S. blaed, as denoting, either the boughs or leaves of trees, or growing corn; as both often shoot out so rapidly as to give the idea of weakness; or, to Germ. blode, the original sense of which is, weak, feeble.

BLAD, s. A portfolio, S. B.

As the E. word is comp. of Fr. porter, to carry, and feuille, a leaf; the S. term has a similar origin, being evidently from Su. G. blad, A. S. blaed, folium.

To BLAD.
 1. Used impers. "Its bladdin on o' weet," the rain is driving on; a phrase that denotes intermitting showers accompanied with squalls, S.
 2. To abuse, to maltreat in whatever way. Aberd. Corn is said to be bladdit, when overthrown by wind.
 3. To slap, to strike; to drive by striking, or with violence, S. Dad, synon.
Evergreen.

Germ. blodern is used in the first sense.  Es blodert, it storms and snows; also, blat-en, to blow.  Isl. blaegt-a indeed signifies, to be moved by the wind, motari aura; O. Fr. plaud-er, to bang, to maul.

BLAD, s. A squall; always including the idea of rain, S. A heavy fall of rain is called "a blad of weet," S. B.

Bladdy, adj. Inconstant, unsettled; applied to the weather. "A bladdy day," is one alternately fair and foul.

BLAD, s. A dirty spot on the cheek, S. perhaps q. the effect of a blow, Gael. blad, however, is synon.

BLADARIE, s. Perhaps, vain glory.
R. Bruce.

Teut. blaeterije, jactantia, vaniloquentia.

BLADDERAND, BLADDRAND
V. Blether.

BLADE, s. The leaf of a tree, S.

A. S. blaed, bled; Su. G.  Isl.  Belg. blad, Germ. blat, Alem. plat, id.; perhaps the part. pa. of A. S. blew-an, blow-an, florere, to bud, to burgeon; blaewed, q. what is blowed, or shot forth; just as Franc. bluat, flos, is from bly-en, florere.

BLADOCH, BLEDOCH, BLADDA, s. Butter-milk, S. B.
Bannatyne Poems.

Ir. bladhach, Gael. blath-ach, id. C. B. blith, milk in general.

BLADRY, s. Expl. "trumpery."
Kelly.

It may be either the same with Bladarie, or Blaidry, q. v.

BLAE, BLAY, s. The rough parts of wood left in consequence of boring or sawing, S. B.

Germ. bleh, thin leaves or plates; lamina, bracteola; Wachter.

BLAES, s. pl. Apparently, lamina of stone, S.
Law Case.

BLAE, adj. Livid.
V. Bla.

BLAE-BERRY, s. The Billberry; Vaccinium myrtillus, Linn.
Ramsay.

Sw. bla-baer, vaccinium, Seren. Isl. blaber, myrtilli; G. Andr.

To BLAFLUM, v. a. To beguile, S.
V. Bleflum.
Ramsay.

BLAIDRY, s. Nonsense.
V. Blether, v.

BLAIDS, s. pl.
Watson's Coll.

A. S. blaedr, Su. G. blaedot, and Germ. blater, denote a pimple, or swelling with many reddish pimples that eat and spread. A. S. blaecth, leprosy.

BLAIN, s. A mark left by a wound, the discolouring of the skin after a sore, S.
Rutherford.

A. S. blegene, Belg. bleyne, pustula.  But our term is more closely allied to Isl. blina, which is not only rendered pustula, but also, caesio ex verbere; G. Andr. Germ. blae-en, to swell.

BLAIN, s. A blank, a vacancy.
A blain in a field, a place where the grain has not sprung, Loth.

Probably a metaph. use of the preceding word.

BLAIR, s. That part of flax which is afterwards used in manufacture, properly after it has been steeped, and laid out for being dried; for it is subsequently called lint, S. This in E. is denominated harle.

Sw. blaer, hards of flax; but rather from Isl. blaer, aura, because it is thus exposed to the drought.

To BLAIR, v. n. To become dry by exposure to the drought, Ang.

BLAIRIN, s. The ground appropriated for drying flax, Ang.

This term also denotes the ground on which peats are laid out to be dried, ibid.

BLAIRAND, part. pr. Roaring, crying.

Teut. blaer-en, mugire, Gl. Sibb.

BLAIT, adj. Naked, bare.
Pr. of Peblis.

BLAIT, BLATE, adj.
 1. Bashful, sheepish, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Blunt, unfeeling; a secondary sense.
Douglas.
 3. Curt, rough, uncivil.
Spalding.
 4. Easily deceived.
Gl. Surv. Nairn.

O. E. blade, silly, frivolous; or in the same sense in which we now speak of a blunt reason or excuse.  Isl. blaad-ur, blauth-ur, blaud, soft.  The word seems to be primarily applied to things which are softened by moisture.  Mollis, limosus, maceratus. Hence used to signify what is feminine; as opposed to huat-ar, masculine.  It also signifies, timid. Bleyde, softness, fear, shame; hugbleith, softness of mind; Germ.  Su. G. blode, Belg. blood, mollis, timidus.

BLAIT-MOUIT, adj. Bashful, sheepish, q. ashamed to open one's mouth.

BLAITIE-BUM, s. Simpleton, stupid fellow.
Lyndsay.

If this be the genuine orthography, perhaps from Teut. blait, vaniloquus; or rather, blait, sheepish, and bomme, tympanum.  But it is generally written Batie-bum, q. v.

BLAK of the EIE, the apple of the eye, S.
R. Bruce.

BLAN, pret. Caused to cease.
Gawan and Gol.

It is undoubtedly the pret. of blin; A. S. blan, blann, cessavit.

BLANCHART, adj. White.
Gawan and Gol.

Fr. blanc, blanche, id. The name blanchards is given to a kind of linen cloth the yarn of which has been twice bleached, before it was put into the loom; perhaps immediately from Teut. blancke, id. and aerd, Belg. aardt, nature.

V. Art.

BLANCIS, s. pl. Ornaments worn by those who represented Moors, in the Pageant exhibited at Edinburgh, A. 1590.
Watson's Coll.

If not allied to Fr. blanc, white, it may be a cognate of Germ.  Su. G. blaess, Isl. bles, signum album in fronte equi; whence E. blason, S. Bawsand, q. v.

BLAND, s. Some honourable piece of dress worn by knights and men of rank.
Maitland Poems.

Blanda, according to Bullet, is a robe adorned with purple, a robe worn by grandees.  Su. G. blyant, bliant, a kind of precious garment among the ancients, which seems to have been of silk.

To BLAND, v. a. To mix, to blend.
Douglas.

Su. G. Isl. bland-a, to mix.

BLANDED BEAR, barley and common bear mixed, S.
Statist. Acc.

From Su. G. bland-a is formed blan-saed, meslin or mixed corn.

BLAND, s. A drink used in the Shetland Islands.
Brand.

Isl. blanda, cinnus, mixtura, pro potu, aqua mixto; Su. G. bland dicebatur mel aqua permixtum.

To BLANDER, v. a.
 1. To babble, to diffuse any report, such especially as tends to injure the character of another, S.
 2. Sometimes used to denote the want of regard to truth in narration; a thing very common with tattlers, S. B.

Perhaps from Isl. bland-a, Dan. bland-er, to mingle, as denoting the blending of truth with falsehood.

BLANDIT, part. pa. Flattered, soothed.
Dunbar.

Fr. blander, to soothe, Lat. blandiri.

To BLASH, n. a. To soak, to drench. "To blash one's stomach," to drink too copiously of any weak and diluting liquor; S.
V. Plash.

Perhaps radically the same with plash, from Germ. platz-en.

BLASH, s. A heavy fall of rain; S.

BLASHY, adj. Deluging, sweeping away by inundation; S.
Ramsay.

Blashy, "thin, poor; Northumb."

BLASNIT, adj. Perhaps, bare, bald, without hair.
Bannatyne Poems.

Germ. bloss, bare, bloss-en, to make bare; or rather, Teut. bles, calvus, whence blesse, frons capillo nuda.

BLASOWNE, s.
 1. Dress over the armour, on which the armorial bearings were blazoned. 
Wyntown.
 2. The badge of office worn by a king's messenger on his arm, S.
Erskine.

Germ. blaesse denotes a sign in general.  Thence blazon, a term marking that sign, in heraldry, which is peculiar to each family.  The origin seems to be Su. G. blaesse.

V. Bawsand.

To BLAST, v. n.
 1. To pant, to breathe hard, S. B.
Ross.
 2. To smoke tobacco, S. B.
 3. To blow with a wind instrument.
Gawan and Gol.
 4. To boast, to speak in an ostentatious manner. S.

Su. G blaas-a, inspirare, Germ. blas-en, flare.  Isl. blast-ur, halitus, flatus.

Hence,

BLAST, s. A brag, a vain boast, S.
Z. Boyd.

BLASTER, s. A boaster; also, one who speaks extravagantly in narration, S.

BLASTIE, s. "A shrivelled dwarf; a term of contempt," S. q. what is blasted.
Burns.

To BLAST, v. a. To blow up with gunpowder.
Statist. Acc.

BLASTER. One who is employed to blow up stones with gunpowder; S.
Pennant.

BLATE, adj. Bashful.
V. Blait.

To BLATHER, v. n. To talk nonsensically.

BLATHER, s.
V. Blether.

BLATTER, s. A rattling noise; S.
Ramsay.

Lat. blater-are, Teut. blater-en, stultè loqui.

BLAUCHT, adj. Pale, livid.
Palace of Hon.

A. S. blac, blaec; Su. G. blek, Isl. bleik-r, E. bleak, pallidus.  A. S. blac-ian, Su. G. blek-na, to wax pale.

BLAVING, BLAUING, s. Blowing.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. blawan byman, buccina canere.

BLAW, s. A blow, a stroke.
Wallace.

Teut. blaew-en, caedere.  Blaw is used in this sense. Gl. Westmorel.

To BLAW, v. Used both as a. and n.
 1. To blow; in a literal sense referring to the wind. S.
Douglas.

A. S. blaw-an, flare.

 2. To breathe, S.
Abp. Hamiltoun.
 3. To publish, to make known. S.
Burel.
E. blow is used in the same sense.
 4. To brag, to boast, S. Blast, synon.
Barbour.
Douglas.

Germ. blaw, falsus, mendax, dolosus.  Teut. blas-en, flare et nimiis vanisque laudibus rem efferre, ac inani flatu infarcire.

 5. To magnify in narration, especially from a principle of ostentation, S.
 6. To flatter, to coax.
Baillie.
S. Prov. "Ye first burn me, and then blaw me."
 7. To blaw in one's lug, to cajole or flatter a person, so as to be able to guide him at will, S.
Nicol Burne.
To blow in the ear, id. O. E.

Su. G. blaas-a, to instil evil counsel.  Teut. oor-blaesen, not only signifies, in aurem mussare, sive mussitare, obgannire in aurem; but is rendered, blandiri.

 8. To huff a man at draughts. I blaw, or blow you, I take this man, S.

Su. G. blaas-a, to blow, is used in this very sense. Blaasa bort en bricka i damspel, Seren.

 9. To blaw appin locks or bolts, and to loose fetters, by means of a magical power ascribed to the breath, S.
Satan's Invisible World.

 10. To blaw out on one, to reproach him.
Wallace.

BLAW, s.
 1. A blast, a gust, S. Rudd.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. The sound emitted by a wind instrument.
 3. A falsehood, a lie told from ostentation. He tells greit blaws, S. B.
Ramsay.

BLAW, s. A pull, a draught; a cant term, used among topers, S.
Ferguson.

BLAWN COD, a split cod, half-dried, Ang.; so denominated, perhaps, because exposed for some time to the wind.

BLAWORT, s. The Blue bottle; Centaurea cyanus, Linn., S. Witch-bells, also Thumbles, S. B.
Neill.

From bla, livid, q. v. and wort, an herb.

BLAZE, s. The name given to allum ore, S.

BLE, BLIE, s. Complexion, colour.
Gawan and Gol.

This word is common in O. E.   A. S. bleoh, blio, color.

To BLEACH down, or along, v. n. To fall flat to the ground. Bleach is also used to denote a fall of this description, Loth.

Perhaps from Isl. blak-a, verberare; as denoting the effect of a violent blow.

BLEACH, s. A blow, S. B.
Gl. Shirr.
Poems Buchan Dialect.

To BLEAD, v. a. Apparently, to train, or to lead on to the chace.
Statist. Acc.

Alem. blait-en, beleit-en, comitari, conducere.

BLEAR, s. Something that obscures the sight.
V. Bleiris.
Ross.

To BLECK, BLEK, v. a.
 1. To blacken, literally, S.
Polwart.
 2. To injure one's character.
Bannatyne Poems.
 3. To cause moral pollution.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

A. S. blaec-an, denigrare.  Isl. blek, liquor tinctorius.

To BLECK, v. a. To puzzle, to reduce to a nonplus, in an examination or disputation, S.

Germ. black-en, plack-en, vexare, exagitare.

To BLEEZE, v. n.
 1. To become a little sour. Milk is said to bleeze, or to be bleezed, when it is turned, but not congealed, S.; blink, synon.

From Germ. blaes-en, to blow; or, blitz-en, fulgurare; heat, especially when accompanied by lightning, more generally producing this effect.

2. The part. bleezed signifies the state of one on whom intoxicating liquor begins to operate, S. It especially denotes the change produced in the expression of the countenance; as, He looked bleezed-like.

BLED, part. pa. Perhaps, sprung.
Gawan and Gol.

BLEFLUM, BLEPHUM, s. A sham, an illusion, what has no reality in it, S.
V. Blaflum, v.
Rutherford.

Isl. flim, irrisio, carmen famosum.  Hence flimt-a, diffamo, flimt, nugae infames, G. Andr. p. 74.  Su. G. flimm-a, illudere.

BLEHAND, BLIHAND, adj.
Sir Trist.

"Blue, from bleah, Sax. caeruleus. Blehand brown. A bluish brown," Gl.  The word is merely A. S. blae-hewen a little transformed.  The idea seems, "a brownish colour, inclining to purple or violet."

BLEIB, s.
 1. A pustule, a blister. "A burnt bleib," a blister caused by burning, S.

Bleb, a blister, A. Bor. Gl. Grose.

2. Bleibs, pl. An eruption to which children are subject, in which the spots appear larger than in the measles; Loth. Border.
V. Blob.

BLEIRIE, adj. A term applied to weak liquor, which has little or no strength; as bleirie ale, Fife.

BLEIRING, part. pa. Bleiring Bats.
Polwart.

This seems to be the botts, a disease in horses.  Bleiring may express the effect of pain in making the patient to cry out; Teut. blaer-en, boare, mugire.

BLEIRIS, s. pl. Something that prevents distinctness of vision.
Philotus.

This is the same with blear, s. only used in the pl.  Ihre mentions E. blear-eyed, as allied to Su. G. blir-a, plir-a, oculis semiclausis videre.

BLEIS, BLES, BLESS, BLEISE, s.
 1. Blaze, bright flame, S. B.
Barbour.
 2. A torch, S.
Douglas.

A. S. blaese, fax, taeda, a torch, any thing that makes a blaze, Su. G. bloss, id. Somn.

3. A signal made by fire, S.

BLEIS, s. The name given to a river-fish.
Sibbald.

This seems to be what in E. is called Bleak, Cyprinus alburnus, Linn.

BLELLUM, s. An idle talking fellow, Ayrs.
Burns.

To BLEME, v. n. To bloom, to blossom.
Bannatyne Poems.

BLEMIS, s. pl. Blossoms, flowers.
Houlate.

Belg. bloem, Isl. bloma, Alem. bluom, flos, flosculus.  Teut. bloem-en, florere.

To BLENK, BLINK, v. n.
 1. To open the eyes, as one does from a slumber, S.
Barbour.
 2. To throw a glance on one, especially as expressive of regard, S.
Ross.
 3. To look with a favourable eye; used metaph. in allusion to the shining of the sun, after it has been covered with a cloud.
V. Blink, v.
Baillie.

Belg. blenck-en, blinck-en, Su. G. blaenk-a, to shine, to glance, to flash as lightning.

BLENK, BLINK, s.
 1. A beam, a ray.
Douglas.
 2. "A glimpse of light," S. Sir J. Sinclair's Observ. p. 113.
 3. Hence transferred to the transient influence of the rays of the sun, especially in a cold or cloudy day. Thus it is common to speak of "a warm blink," "a clear blink," S.
Sir J. Sinclair.
 4. A gleam of prosperity, during adversity.
Godscroft.
 5. Also transferred to a glance, a stroke of the eye, or transient view of any object; the idea being borrowed, either from the quick transmission of the rays of light, or from the short-lived influence of the sun when the sky is much obscured with clouds, S.
Douglas.
 6. A kindly glance, a transient glance expressive of regard, S.
Burns.
 7. A moment. "I'll not stay a blink," I will return immediately. In a blink, in a moment, S.
Ramsay.

Su. G. blink, oegonblink, is a glance, a cast of the eye, oculi nictus; Germ. blick, Belg. blik, oogenblik, id.; the twinkling of the eye, a moment.

BLENT, pret. Glanced, expressing the quick motion of the eye.
Gawan and Gol.

Perhaps allied to Su. G. bliga, blia, intentis oculis aspicere, q. bligent.

BLENT, s. A glance.
Douglas.

BLENT, pret. Lost, as applied to sight.
King's Quair.

Perhaps from A. S. blent, the part. of A. S. blend-ian, caecare, used in a neuter sense; or from A. S. blinn-an, cessare, whence blind, deficiens.

BLENTER, s. A flat stroke; Fife.

Alem. bliuun, to strike; bliuenti, percutiens, striking; Schilter.  Moes. G. bliggwan, id.

To BLETHER, BLATHER, v. n.
 1. To speak indistinctly, to stammer, S. pron. like fair.
 2. To prattle, S.

Su. G. bladdr-a, Germ, plauder-n, to prattle, to chatter, to jabber; Teut. blater-en, stultè loqui; Lat. blater-are, to babble.

To BLETHER, BLATHER, BLADDER, v. a. To talk nonsensically, S.
Lyndsay.

BLETHERAND, pret.
Fordun.

Allied perhaps to Teut. blater-en, blaeter-en, proflare fastum, gloriari.

BLETHER, BLATHER, s. Nonsense, foolish talk, S.; often used in pl.
Hamilton.

BLAIDRY, s. Nonsense, foolish talk.
Ramsay.

BLEW. To look blew, to seem disconcerted. It conveys both the idea of astonishment and of gloominess, S.
Peblis to the Play.

Blew, S. is often synon. with blae, livid.

BLICHAM, s. (gutt.) A contemptuous designation for a person, Perths.

BLICHT, adj. An epithet expressive of the coruscation of armour, in the time of action.
Houlate.

A. S. blic-an, coruscare; blect, coruscatus. Alem. blechet, Germ. blicket, splendet.

To BLIN, BLYN, BLYNE, v. n. To cease, to desist, S.; also blind.
Wallace.

A. S. blinn-an, cessare, contr. from bilinn-an, id.  In Isl. and Su. G. it occurs in its simple form, linn-a, also, lind-a, id.

To BLIN, v. a. To cause to cease.
Chron. S. Poet.

BLIND HARIE, Blind man's buff, S. Belly-blind, synon.
Herd.

In the Scandinavian Julbock, from which this sport seems to have originated, the principal actor was disguised in the skin of a buck or goat.  The name Blind Harie might therefore arise from his rough attire; as he was called blind, in consequence of being blindfolded.  Or it may signify, Blind Master, or Lord, in ironical language.
V. Herie.

BLIND MAN'S BALL, or Devil's snuff-box, Common puff-ball, S. V. Flor. Suec.
Lightfoot.

It is also called Blind man's een, i. e. eyes, S. B.  An idea, according to Linn., prevails throughout the whole of Sweden, that the dust of this plant causes blindness.

BLYNDIT, pret. Blended.
Gawan and Gol.

BLINDLINS, BLYNDLINGIS, adv. Having the eyes closed, hoodwinked. It denotes the state of one who does any thing as if he were blind, S.
V. Lingis

Germ.  Dan. blindlings, id.

Douglas.

BLINDS, s. pl. The Pogge, or Miller's Thumb, a fish, Cottus Cataphractus, Linn. West of S.
Statist. Acc.

Perhaps it receives this name, because its eyes are very small.

To BLINK, v. n.
 1. To become a little sour; a term used with respect to milk or beer, S. Bleeze, synon.
Chr. Kirk.
 2. To be blinkit, to be half drunk, Fife.

Su. G. blaenk-a, Germ. blink-en, coruscare, to shine, to flash, to lighten; q. struck with lightning, which, we know, has the effect of making liquids sour; or as denoting that of sunshine, or of the heat of the weather.

BLINNYNG, part. pr. Leg. Blumyng.
Maitland Poems.

BLYPE, s. A coat, a shred; applied to the skin, which is said to come off in blypes, when it peels in coats, or is rubbed off, in shreds; S.
Burns.

Perhaps radically the same with Flype, q. v. or a different pron. of Bleib.

To BLIRT, v. n. To make a noise in weeping, to cry. It is generally joined with Greet. To blirt and greet, i. e. to burst out a-crying, S.
Kelly.

Germ. blaerr-en, plarr-en, mugire, rugire.  Perhaps E. blurt is also radically allied.

BLIRT, s. The action expressed by the v. "A blirt of greeting," a violent burst of tears, accompanied with crying, S. B.

To BLITHE, BLYTHE, v. a. To make glad.
Wallace.

A. S. bliths-ian, laetari; Alem. blid-en, gaudere.  But perhaps our v. is immediately formed from the adj.

BLITHEMEAT, s. The meat distributed among those who are present at the birth of a child, or among the rest of the family, S. pronounced blyidmeat, Ang. as the adj. itself, blyd, blyid.

I need not say, that this word has its origin from the happiness occasioned by a safe delivery.

BLYVARE. Perhaps for Blyther, more cheerful.
Houlate.

BLYWEST, adj. in the superl.
Houlate.

"Blythest, most merry," Gl. Perhaps it rather refers to colour; q. the palest.

To BLIZZEN, v. a. Drought is said to be blizzening, when the wind parches and withers the fruits of the earth, S. B.

Su. G. blas-a, Germ. blas-en, A. S. blaes-an, to blow.

BLOB, BLAB, s. Any thing tumid or circular, S.
 1. A small globe or bubble of any liquid.
Bellenden.
 2. A blister, or that rising of the skin which is the effect of a blister or of a stroke, S.
Gl. Complaynt.
 3. A large gooseberry; so called from its globular form, or from the softness of its skin, S.
 4. A blot, a spot; as "a blab of ink," S. denominated perhaps from its circular form.

Radically the same word with Bleib, q. v.

BLOBBIT, part. pa. Blotted, blurred.
V. Blob.
Acts Ja. I.

To BLOCK, v. a. To plan, to devise.
Baillie.

Teut. block-en, assiduum esse in studiis, in opere, in ergastulo; a sense evidently borrowed from a workman, who blocks out his work roughly, before he begins to give it a proper form.

BLOIK, BLOK, BLOCK, s.
 1. A scheme, a contrivance; generally used in a bad sense.
Douglas.
 2. A bargain, an agreement.
Acts Ja. VI.

BLOCKER, s. A term formerly used in S. to denote a broker; q. one who plans and accomplishes a bargain.
Minsheu.

BLOISENT, part. pa. One is said to have a bloisent face, when it is red, swollen, or disfigured, whether by intemperance, or by being exposed to the weather; Ang.

This appears to be radically the same with E. blowze; "sun-burnt, high-coloured;" Johns.  Teut. blose, rubor, purpurissum, redness, the colour of purple; blos-en, rubescere; blosende wanghen, rubentes genae, purpled cheeks.

To BLOME, BLUME, v. n. To shine, to gleam.
Barbour.

Su. G. blomm-a, to flourish; E. bloom, used metaph.: or perhaps from A. S. be, a common prefix, and leom-an to shine, as gleam is from geleom-an, id.

BLONK, BLOUK, s. A steed, a horse,
Gawan and Gol.

Alem. planchaz, equus pallidus, hodie blank; Schilter.  Thus blonk may have originally meant merely a white horse, q. Fr. blanc cheval.

BLONKS, s. pl.
King Hart.

If this does not denote horses, as above, it may mean blocks of wood.

BLOUT, adj. Bare, naked.
V. Blait.
Douglas.

Su. G.  Isl. blott, Belg. bloot, id.  The tautological phrase blott och bar is used in Sw.

BLOUT, s.
 1. The sudden breaking of a storm, S. Bloutenin, Clydesd.
 2. "A blout of foul weather," a sudden fall of rain, snow or hail, accompanied with wind, S.
 3. A sudden eruption of a liquid substance, accompanied with noise, S.

Probably allied to Su. G. bloet, humidus; bloeta waegar, viae humidae.

BLUBBER, BLUBBIR, s. A bubble of air, S.
V. Blob.
Henrysone.

To BLUDDER, BLUTHER, v. a.
 1. To blot paper in writing, to disfigure any writing, S.

Su. G. pluttra, incuriose scribere; Moes. G. blothjan, irritum reddere.

2. To disfigure the face with weeping, or in any other way, S.
Ross. Cleland.

To BLUDDER, BLUTHER, v. n. To make a noise with the mouth in taking any liquid, S.

BLUE BONNETS, BLUE BOTTLES, S. Centaurea cyanus, Linn.
Lightfoot.

BLUE-GOWN, s. The name commonly given to a pensioner, who, annually, on the King's birth-day, receives a certain sum of money, and a blue gown or cloak, which he wears with a badge on it, S.
V. Bedeman.

BLUFFLEHEADED, adj. Having a large head, accompanied with the appearance of dulness of intellect, S.; perhaps from E. bluff.

BLUIDVEIT, BLUIDWYTE, s. A fine paid for effusion of blood.
Skene. Reg. Maj.

A. S. blodwite, pro effuso sanguine mulcta; from blod, sanguis, and wite, poena, mulcta.

To BLUITER, v. n.
 1. To make a rumbling noise; to blurt, S.
 2. To bluiter up with water, to dilute too much, S.
 3. To blatter, to pour forth lame, harsh, and unmusical rhymes.
Polwart.

Germ. plaudern, nugari et mentiri, plauderei, mixta nugis mendacia.  In sense 2. it seems to be merely a dimin. from Blout, q. v.

BLUITER, BLUTTER, s.
 1. A rumbling noise; as that sometimes made by the intestines, S.
 2. Apparently used to denote filth in a liquid state.
Cleland.

To BLUME, v. n. To blossom, S. bloom, E.

To BLUNK, v. a. To spoil a thing, to mismanage any business, S. Hence,

BLUNKIT, BLINKIT, part. pa. "Injured by mismanagement, or by some mischievous contrivance," Gl. Sibb.

BLUNKET, s. Expl. "Pale blue; perhaps any faint or faded colour; q. blanched." Sibb.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

BLUNT, adj. Stripped, bare, naked.
Douglas.

This seems to be radically the same with Blout, q. v.

BLUNTIE, s. A sniveller, a stupid fellow, S.
Burns.

BLUP, s. One who makes a clumsy or awkward appearance; Loth. It is apparently the same with Flup, q. v.

To BLUSTER, v. a. To disfigure in writing.
V. Bludder, v.
Baillie.

BLUTE, s. An action; used in a bad sense. A fuil blute, a foolish action, S. B. perhaps the same with Blout, q. v.

BOAKIE, s. A sprite, a hobgoblin, Aberd. Shetl.

Norw. bokje, Isl. bocke, bokki, vir grandis et magnificus.  In Sanscrit buka is the name of an evil spirit.  O. Teut. bokene, phantasma, spectrum.

BOAL, BOLE, s.
 1. A square aperture in the wall of a house, for holding small articles; a small press generally without a door; S. This is most common in cottages.
Ramsay.
 2. A perforation through the wall of a house, for occasionally giving air or light; usually with a wooden shutter instead of a pane of glass, S.

BOARDTREES, s. pl. A term used for the plank on which a corpse is stretched; S. B.

To BOAST, BOIST, v. a. To threaten.
V. Boist.

To BOB, BAB, v. n. To dance, S.
Herd.

BOB, s. Gust, blast.
V. Bub.

BOB, s.
 1. A bunch; used as synon. with cow, S.
Priests of Peblis.
 2. The same word, pronounced bab, is used for a bundle of flowers, a nosegay.

S. Fr. bube, a bunch; Isl. bobbe, a knot.

BOB, s. A mark, a but, S.; either q. a small bunch set up as a mark, or, from the sense of the E. v., something to strike at.

BOB, s. A taunt, a scoff, S. B.

Teut. babb-en, to prate; Isl. komenn i bobba, os correptum, at bobsa, babare (to bark,) canum vox est.  Su. G. babe, sermo inconditus.

BOBBY, s. A grandfather, S. B.
Ross.

BOBBYN, s. The seed-pod of birch, Loth.

Fr. bubon, a great bunch.

Evergreen.

BOBBINS, s. The water-lily, S. B. Bobbins are properly the seed-vessels.
V. Cambie-leaf.

BOCE; Burel, Watson's Coll. ii. 26.
V. Boss.

To BOCK, v. a. To vomit.
V. Bok.

BOCK-BLOOD, s. A spitting, or throwing up of blood.
Polwart.

BOD, s. A person of small size, a term generally applied, somewhat contemptuously, to one who is dwarfish, although of full age, S.

To BODE, v. a. To proffer, often as implying the idea of some degree of constraint. "He did na merely offer, but he boded it on me;" S.

BODEN, part. pa. Preferred.

BODE, BOD, s. An offer made in order to a bargain, a proffer, S.
Ramsay.

Germ. bot, id. from biet-en, to offer.  Isl. bud, a proffer, from bioth-a, offerre, exhibere, praebere.

BODE, s. Delay.
Sir Egeir.

BODDUM, s.
 1. Bottom.
Douglas.
 2. Hollow, valley.
Douglas.

Alem. bodem, Germ. Belg. boden, solum, fundus.

BODEN, part. pa. Proffered.
V. Bode, v.

BODEN, BODIN, BODYN, part. pa.
 1. Prepared, provided, furnished, in whatever way, S.
Acts Ja. I.

Weil-boden, or ill-boden, well, or ill provided in whatever respect, S.

 2. It seems to be used, in one instance, in an oblique sense, as signifying matched.
V. Boun.
Barbour.

Su. G. bo, Isl. bo-a, to prepare, to provide; wael bodd, well provided against the cold.

BODY, s. Strength, bodily ability.
Barbour.

A. S. bodig not only signifies the body in general, but stature.

BODLE, BODDLE, s. A copper coin, of the value of two pennies Scots, or the third part of an English penny.
Rudd.

These pieces are said to have been denominated from a mint-master of the name of Bothwell.

BODWORD, BODWART, BODWORDE, s. A message, S. B.
Wallace.

A. S. boda, a messenger, and word.  Su. G. Isl. bodword is edictum, mandatum.

BOETINGS, BUITINGS, s. pl. Half-boots, or leathern spatterdashes.
Dunbar.

Teut. boten schoen, calceus rusticus e crudo corio; Kilian.

BOGGARDE, s. A bugbear.
Rollocke.

A. Bor. boggart, a spectre.  C. B. bwg, larva, terriculamentum.

BOGILL, BOGLE, s.
 1. A spectre, a hobgoblin, S. A. Bor.
Douglas.
 2. A scarecrow, a bugbear, S.  synon. doolie, cow; being used in both senses.

C. B. bugul, fear, bwgwly, to frighten.

BOGILL about the stacks, or simply, Bogle, a play of children or young people, in which one hunts several others around the stacks of corn in a barn-yard, S.
Ritson.

It seems the same game with that called Barley-bracks, q. v.  The name has probably originated from the idea of the huntsman employed being a scarecrow to the rest.

BOGILL-BO, s.
 1. A hobgoblin or spectre, S.
Ramsay.
 2. A pettish humour.
Philotus.

In Lincolnsh. this word is used for a scarecrow, from bogill, or C. B. bogel-u, to affright, and bo, a hobgoblin, q. "the affrighting goblin."

To BOGG-SCLENT, v. n. Apparently, to avoid action, to abscond in the day of battle.
Colvil.

Perhaps in allusion to him who sklents or strikes off obliquely from the highway, into a bog, to avoid being taken prisoner.

BOGSTALKER, s. An idle, wandering, and stupid fellow; one who seems to have little to do, and no understanding, S.
V. Stalker.
Ramsay.

Borrowed perhaps from outlaws, who were seen at a distance hunting in marshy places, where pursuit was more difficult.

BOID, s.
Maitland Poems.

Isl. bode, a term used to denote a wave agitated by the wind; unda maris cum vadosis scopulis luctans.

BOIN, BOYN, BOYEN, BOWYNE, s.
 1. A washing-tub, S. B.
 2. A flat broad-bottomed vessel, into which milk is emptied from the pail, a bowyne, Loth.

Unless from Isl. boginn, curvus, or Dan. bugn-e, to bend, as respecting its form; I can offer no conjecture as to the origin.

BOYIS, s. In boyis, in fetters.
Barbour.

Teut. boeye, compes, pedica, vinculum; boey-en compedire.

BOIS, adj. Hollow.
V. Bos.

BOISSES.
V. Boss.
Knox's Hist.

To BOIST, BOAST, v. a. To threaten, to endeavour to terrify, S.
Douglas.

C. B. bost-io, to vaunt one's self; bost, vaunting.

BOIST, BOST, s. Threatening, S.
Wallace.

BOIT, s. A cask or tub used for the purpose of curing butcher-meat, or for holding it after it is cured; sometimes called a beef-boat, S.
Ruddiman.

Germ. butte; Ital. botte, id., whence E. butt.  Su. G. byttia, situla, cupa; Teut. botte, id. dolium, orca, cupa.

To BOK, BOCK, v. a.
 1. To vomit, S.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. To reach, to incline to puke, S.
 3. To belch, (eructare) S.

A. Bor. boke, bowk, to nauseate, to be ready to vomit; booac, to reach, to keck, ibid.  Perhaps from A. S. bealc-an, eructare.  It however has greater resemblance of puke, to which no etymon has been assigned.

BOK, BOCK, s. The act of reaching, S.
Cleland.

BOKEIK, s. Bopeep, a game.
Lyndsay.

BOKS, s. pl. "Corner teeth," Gl. Sibb.
Maitland Poems.

To BOLDIN, BOLDYN, v. n. To swell.
Douglas.

Boldin, Boulden, part. pa. swelled.

This is softened into bowdin, bowden, S.  Often in the pret. and part. it is written bolnys, swells, (Doug. V.) and bolnyt.  I hesitate whether these are contr. from boldinnys, boldinnyt, or the v. in another form, more nearly resembling Su. G. buln-a, Dan. bul-ner.  Su. G. bul-na, bulg-ia, id. bolginn, swollen.  Hence Isl. bilgia, Su. G. bolgia, a billow; because it is raised by the wind; and bolda, a boil, a tumour.  Gael. builg-am to swell, builg, a blister.

BOLGAN LEAVES, Nipplewort, an herb, S. B. Lapsana communis, Linn.

Perhaps from Isl. bolg-a, tumere, or Su. G. bolginn, swollen, q. "swelling leaves," as being supposed by the vulgar in S. to be efficacious in removing swellings.

To BOLYN, v. n. To lay tack aboard.
Maitland Poems.

O. Fr. bolin-er, to sail by a wind, or close upon a wind.

BOLL, Lintseed Boll.
V. Bow.

BOLLMAN, s. A cottager, Orkn.
Statist. Acc.

Perhaps from Su. G.  Isl. bol, villa, and man, q. the inhabitant of a village.  It is always pronounced bowman.

BOLME, s. A boom, a waterman's pole.
Douglas.

Germ. baum, Belg. boom, a tree.

BOLNIT.
V. Boldin.

BOLNYNG, s. Swelling.
V. Boldin.
Henrysone.

BOLSTER, s. That part of a mill in which the axletree moves, S.

BOMBILL, s. Buzzing noise; metaph. used for boasting.
Polwart.

Teut. bommele, a drone.

BON, s. Apparently, bane, injury.
Wallace.

BONALAIS, BONAILIE, BONNAILLIE, s. A drink taken with a friend, when one is about to part with him; as expressive of one's wishing him a prosperous journey, S.
Wallace.

It is now generally pron. bonaillie, S.  Bonalais might seem to be the plur.  But perhaps it merely retains the form of Fr. Bon allez.

BONE, s. A petition, a prayer.
Douglas.

O. E. id.  Isl. baen, precatio, oratio; boon petitio, gratis acceptio, mendicatio, G. Andr.  A. S. ben, bene, id.

BONETT, s. "A small sail, fixed to the bottom or sides of the great sails, to accelerate the ship's way in calm weather." Gl. Compl.
Douglas.

Fr. bonnette, Sw. bonet, id.

BONIE, BONYE, BONNY, adj.
 1. Beautiful, pretty, S.
Maitland Poems.
Boniest, most beautiful.
Montgomerie.
 2. It is occasionally used ironically, in the same way with E. pretty, S.
Priests of Peblis.
 3. Precious, valuable.
Minstrelsy Border.

Bonny is used in the same sense by Shakspeare, and since his time by some other E. writers.  But I suspect that it is properly S.  Johnson derives it from Fr. bon, bonne, good.  This is by no means satisfactory; but we must confess that we cannot substitute a better etymon.

BONYNES, s. Beauty, handsomeness.
Philotus.

BONK, s. Bank.
Douglas.

Probably corr. from A. S. bene.  Isl. bunga, however, signifies tumor terrae.

BONNAGE, s. An obligation, on the part of the tenant, to cut down the proprietor's corn.
Statist. Acc.

Evidently a corr. of Bondage.

BONNAR, s. "A bond," Gl.

Popular Ball.

BONNET.
V. White Bonnet.

BONOCH, s. "A binding to tie a cow's hind legs when she is a-milking."
Kelly.

BONSPEL, s. A match, at the diversion of curling on the ice, between two opposite parties, S.
V. Curl.
Graeme.

Belg. bonne, a village, a district, and spel, play; because the inhabitants of different villages or districts contend with each other in this sport, one parish, for example, challenging another.  Or, the first syllable may be traced to Su. G. bonde, an husbandman.

BONXIE, s. The name given to the Skua Gull, Shetl.
Neill.

BOO, BOW, s. A term sometimes used to denote a farm-house or village, in conjunction with the proper name, Ang.

Su. G. bo, Isl. bu, boo, domicilium, a house or dwelling, also, a village; Moes. G. baua, id.

In the Orkney Islands, where the Gothic was long preserved in greater purity than in our country, the principal farm-house on an estate, or in any particular district of it, is in a great many instances called the Boll or Bow.

Barry.

BOODIES, pl. Ghosts, hobgoblins, Aberd.
Journal Lond.

It might be deduced from A. S. boda, a messenger, from bod-ian, to declare, to denounce. But it seems to be rather originally the same with C. B. bugudhai, hobgoblins, Gael. bodach, a ghost.

BOOL, s. A contemptuous term for a man, especially if advanced in years. It is often conjoined with an epithet; as "an auld bool," an old fellow, S.

Su. G. bol, the trunk of the body, as distinguished from the head and feet.

BOOLS of a pot, s. pl. Two crooked instruments of iron, linked together, used for lifting a pot by the ears, S.; also called clips.

Teut. boghel, numella; Germ. bugel, any thing that is circular or curved.

BOOL-HORNED, adj. Perverse, obstinate, inflexible, S. apparently from the same origin with Bools.

Boolie-horned, Border, and W. of S.  A. Bor. buckle-horns, short crooked horns turned horizontally inwards.

BOONMOST, adj. Uppermost, S. pron. bunemist.
Ross.

A. S. bufan, bufon, above, and most.

BOOT, BUT, BOUD, BIT, BUD, BOOST, v. imp. Behoved, was under a necessity of, S.; He boot to do such a thing; he could not avoid it. It bit to be; it was necessary that this should take place.
Ross. Burns.

Bus and bud occur in the same sense in Ywaine and Gawin.  Most probably it is a corr. of behoved, Belg. behoeft.

BOOST, s. A box.
V. Buist.

BOR, BOIR, BORE, s.
 1. A small hole or crevice; a place used for shelter, especially by smaller animals, S.
Sir Tristrem.
 2. An opening in the clouds, when the sky is thick and gloomy, or during rain, is called a blue bore, S. It is sometimes used metaph.
Baillie.

Su. G. Germ. bor, terebra; Isl. bora, foramen; A. S. bor-ian, to pierce.

BORCH, BORGH, BOWRCH, BOROW, s. A surety. The term properly denotes a person who becomes bail for another, for whatever purpose.
Wallace.
 2. A pledge; any thing laid in pawn.
Barbour.

The term occurs in both senses in O. E.  A. S. borg, borh, fide-jussor; also, foenus; Germ. burge, a pledge.  Su. G. borgen, suretyship.  Ihre derives Su. G. and Isl. borg-a, to become surety, from berg-a, a periculo tueri, to protect from danger.  The idea is certainly most natural:  For what is suretyship, but warranting the safety of any person or thing?

To BORCH, v. a. To give a pledge or security for, to bail.
Wallace.

To BORROW, BORW, v. a.
 1. To give security for; applied to property.
Wyntown.
 2. To become surety for; applied to a person.
Baron Courts.

Su. G. borg-a, id.

To BORROW one, to urge one to drink, Ang.

When one pledges another in company, he engages to drink after him; and in ancient times it was generally understood, that he who pledged another, was engaged to drink an equal quantity.

BORROWGANGE, s. A state of suretyship.
Reg. Maj.

Su. G. edgaang, laggaang, are rendered by Ihre, actus jurandi, from gaa, ire; borrowgange may thus be merely the act of going or entering as a surety.

BORD, s.
 1. A broad hem or welt, S.
 2. The edge or border of a woman's cap, S.

Fr. bord, Belg. boord, a welt, a hem, or selvage; Isl. bard, bord, the extremity or margin.

BORDEL, s. A brothel, Dunbar.

Fr. bordel, id., Su. G.  A. S. bord, a house.  The dimin. of this, Ihre says, was L. B. bordell-um, bordil-e, tuguriolum, cujus generis quum olim meretricum stabula essent.

BORDELLAR, s. A haunter of brothels.
Bellenden.

BORE, s. A crevice.
V. Bor.

BORE'S- (or BOAR'S) EARS, s. pl. The name given to the Auricula, S. B. Primula auricula, Linn.

A bear is called a boar, S., especially S. B.

BORE-TREE, s. Sambucus nigra.
V. Bourtree.

BOREAU, s. An executioner.
V. Burio.

BORGH, s. A surety.
V. Borch.

BORN.
Wallace.

Born may have some affinity to Isl. borgun, Su. G. borgen, suretyship; q. one under contract or obligation.

BORROWING DAYS, the three last days of March, Old Stile, S.
Complaynt S.

These days being generally stormy, our forefathers have endeavoured to account for this circumstance, by pretending that March borrowed them from April, that he might extend his power so much longer.  Those who are much addicted to superstition will neither borrow nor lend on any of these days; lest the articles borrowed should be employed for the purposes of witchcraft, against the lenders.  Some of the vulgar imagine, that these days received their designation from the conduct of the Israelites in borrowing the property of the Egyptians.

BOS, BOSS, BOIS, adj.
 1. Hollow, S.
Douglas.
"A boss sound," that which is emitted by a body that is hollow, S.
 2. Empty. A shell, without a kernel, is said to be boss. The word is also used to denote the state of the stomach when it is empty, or after long abstinence, S.
Morison.
 3. In the same sense, it is metaph. applied to a weak or ignorant person. One is said to be "nae boss man," who has a considerable share of understanding, S. B.
Ramsay.
 4. Poor, destitute of worldly substance, S. B.

Teut. bosse, umbo.

Ross.

BOSS, BOCE, s. Any thing hollow.
Burel.
The boss of the side, the hollow between the ribs and the haunch, S.

BOSS, BOISS, s.
 1. A small cask.
Pitscottie.
 2. It seems to denote a bottle, perhaps one of earthen ware; such as is now vulgarly called a gray-beard.
Dunbar.
 3. In pl. bosses, boisses, a term of contempt, conjoined with auld, and applied to persons of a despicable or worthless character.
Knox.

From Fr. boire, to drink, whence boisson, drink, or busse, a cask for holding wines.

BOT, conj. But, often confounded with but, prep. signifying, without.
Douglas.

A. S. butan, buton, are used precisely as S. but, without.

BOTAND, BUT-AND, prep. Besides.
Percy.

BOTAND, adv.
 1. But if, except.
Barbour.
 2. Moreover, besides.
Maitland Poems.

In the latter sense, it is from A. S. butan, praeter.

BOTCARD, s. A sort of artillery used in S. in the reign of Ja. V.
Pitscottie.

The same instruments seem to be afterwards called battars, ib.  Fr. bastarde, "a demie canon, or demie culverin; a smaller piece of any kind," Cotgr.

BOTE, BUTE, s.
 1. Help, advantage; E. boot, Doug.
 2. Compensation, satisfaction; Acts Parl. pass.

A. S. bote, id. from bet-an, emendare, restaurare.

Kin-bote, compensation or "assithment for the slaughter of a kinsman;" Skene, Verb. Sign.

A. S. cyn, cognatio, and bote.

Man-bot, the compensation fixed by the law, for killing a man, according to the rank of the person. Ibid.

A. S. man-bot, id.

Theift-bote, compensation made to the king for theft.

Reg. Maj.

BOTHE, BOOTH, BUITH, s. A shop made of boards; either fixed, or portable, S.
V. Lucken.
Douglas.

Hence the Luckenbooths of Edinburgh, wooden shops, made for being locked up.  Teut. boede, bode, domuncula, casa, Kilian; Su. G. bud, taberna mercatorum, apotheca; Isl. bud, id.

BOTHIE, BOOTHIE, s. A cottage, often used to denote a place where labouring servants are lodged, S.
Neill.

Su. G. bod, a house, a cottage; Gael. bothag, bothan, a cot.

To BOTHER, BATHER, v. a. To teaze one by dwelling on the same subject, or by continued solicitation, S.

BOTHNE, BOTHENE, s.
 1. A park in which cattle are fed and inclosed.
Skene.
 2. A barony, lordship, or sheriffdom.
Assis. Reg. Dav.

L. B. bothena, baronia, aut territorium.

BOTINYS, s. pl. Buskins; Gl. Sibb.

Fr. botine, cothurnus.

V. Boiting.

BOTTLE-NOSE, s. A species of whale, S. Orkn.
Statist. Acc.

BOTTOM-ROOM, s. The name vulgarly given to the space occupied by one sitter in a church, S.

BOTWAND, s. Perhaps, a rod of authority.
Kennedy.

Germ. bot, power, and wand, a rod.

BOUCHT, BOUGHT, s. A curvature or bending of any kind, S. "The bought of the arm," the bending of the arm at the elbow.
Journ. Lond.
Where the sea forms a sort of bay, it is said to have a bought, S.

A. S. bogeht, arcuatus, crooked; bug-an, to bend.  Germ. bug, sinus; bucht, curvatura littoris, Wachter.

To BOUCHT, BOUGHT, v. a. To fold down, S.

Isl. bukt-a, Teut. buck-en, flectere, curvare.

BOUCHT, BOUGHT, BUCHT, BUGHT, s.
 1. A small pen, usually put up in the corner of the fold, into which it was customary to drive the ewes, when they were to be milked; also called ewe-bucht, S.
Douglas.
 2. A house in which sheep are inclosed, Lanerks.; an improper sense.
Statist. Acc.

Teut. bocht, bucht, septum, septa, interseptum, sepimentum clausum.

To BOUCHT, BOUGHT v. a. To inclose in a fold, S.; formed from the s.
Ross.

BOUCHT-KNOT, s. A running knot; one that can easily be loosed, in consequence of the cord being doubled, S.

BOUGARS, s. pl. Cross spars, forming part of the roof of a cottage, used instead of laths, on which wattling or twigs are placed, and above these divots, and then the straw or thatch, S.
Chr. Kirk.

Lincolns. bulkar, a beam; Dan. biaelke, pl. bielcker, beams.  Su. G. bialke, a small rafter, tigillum, in Westro-Goth. is written bolkur.

BOUK, BUIK, s.
 1. The trunk of the body, as distinguished from the head or extremity, S.
A bouk of tauch, all the tallow taken out of an ox or cow, S.

Germ. bauch von talge, id.

A bouk-louse, one that has been bred about the body.

Teut. beuck, truncus corporis.

2. The whole body of man, or carcase of a beast, S.
Douglas.
 3. The body, as contradistinguished from the soul.
R. Bruce.
 4. Size, stature, S. bulk; Boukth, bulk, Gl. Lancash.
J. Nicol.
 5. The greatest share, the principal part, S.
Cleland.

To BOUK, v. n. To bulk, S.

Hence,

BOUKIT, BOWKIT, part. pa.
  1. Large, bulky; S.
Douglas.
 2. Boukit and muckle-boukit are used in a peculiar sense; as denoting the appearance which a pregnant woman makes, after her shape begins to alter.

BOUKSUM, BOUKY, adj. Of the same sense with Boukit, S.
Poems Buchan Dialect.

BOUKE, s. A solitude.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

A. S. buce, secessus, "a solitary and secret place," Somner.

BOULDEN, part. pa. Swelled, inflated.
V. Boldin.

BOULE, "Round," Rudd.
Douglas.

Teut. bol, tumidus, turgidus; or boghel, beughel, curvatura semicircularis, from bogh-en, arcuare.

BOULENA, A sea cheer, signifying, Hale up the bowlings.
Complaynt S.

BOULENE, s. The same with E. Bowline. A rope fastened to the middle part of the outside of a sail.
Complaynt S.

Sw. bog-lina, id. from bog, flexus.

BOUN, BOUNE, BOWN, adj. Ready, prepared, S.
Barbour.
Bone is used in the same sense, O. E.

Su. G. bo, bo-a, to prepare, to make ready; Isl. bu-a, id.  Boen or boin is the part. pa.

To BOUN, BOWN, v. a.
 1. To make ready, to prepare.
Wallace.
 2. To go, to direct one's course to a certain place.
Sir Egeir.

BOUND, BUND, part. pa. Pregnant.
Douglas.

To BOUNT, v. n. To spring, to bound.

Fr. bond-ir, id.

Burel.

BOUNTÉ, s. Worth, goodness.
Barbour.

Fr. bonté, id.

BOUNTETH, BOUNTITH, s.
 1. Something given as a reward for service or good offices.
Watson's Coll.
 2. It now generally signifies what is given to servants, in addition to their wages, S; bounties, S. B.
Ramsay.

Gael. bunntais seems merely a corr. of this word.

BOUR, BOURE, s. A chamber; sometimes a retired apartment, such as ladies were wont to possess in ancient times.
Douglas.

A. S. bur, bure, conclave, an inner chamber, a parlour, a bower.  Teut. buer, id. Dan. buur, conclave, Su. G.  Isl. bur, habitaculum.  Isl. jungfrubur, gynaeceum, ubi olim filiae familias habitabant; literally, the young lady's bower.  Hence bour-bourding, jesting in a lady's chamber, Pink.

BOURACH, BOWROCK, s.
 1. An inclosure; applied to the little houses that children build for play, especially those made in the sand, S.
Kelly.
"We'll never big sandy bowrocks together."
S. Prov. Kelly.
 2. A crowd, a ring, a circle, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dialect.
 3. A confused heap of any kind, S. B.
Such a quantity of body-clothes as is burdensome to the wearer, is called a bourach of claise; Ang.
Statist. Acc.
 4. A cluster, as of trees, S.
Ferguson.

A. S. beorh, burg, an inclosure, a heap; Su. G. borg.

Burrach'd, Bourach'd, part. pa. Inclosed, environed, S. B.
Ross.

BOURACH, BORRACH, s. A band put round a cow's hinder legs at milking, S.

Gael. buarach.

BOURBEE, s. The spotted Whistle fish, S.
Sibbald.

To BOURD, v. n. To jest, to mock, S.
Ramsay.

Fr. bourd-er, id.  But this seems to be merely an abbrev. of behourd-ir, bohord-er, to just together with lances.  Bohord, behord, is originally a Gothic word, as being used by old Northern writers.

BOURD, BOURE, s. A jest, a scoff, S.
Kelly.
Houlate.

BOURIE, s. A hole made in the earth by rabbits, or other animals that hide themselves there; E. a burrow.
Monroe.

From the same origin with Bourach.

BOURTREE, BORETREE, BOUNTREE, s. Common elder, a tree; Sambucus nigra, Linn.; A. Bor. Burtree.
Lightfoot.

It seems to have received its name from its being hollow within, and thence easily bored by thrusting out the pulp.

BOUSHTY, s. Expl. "bed." Aberd.
Shirrefs.

The same with Buisty, q. v.

BOUSTOUR, BOWSTOWRE, s. A military engine, anciently used for battering walls.
Wyntown.

Su. G. byssa, bossa, signifies a mortar, an engine for throwing bombs; Bombarda, Ihre; formerly byssor; from byssa, theca, a box, or case; because in these tubes, as in cases, bullets are lodged.

BOUSUM, BOWSOM, adj.
 1. Pliant, tractable.
Palice Honour.

A. S. bocsum, buhsum, obediens, tractabilis, from bug-an, Belg. buyg-en, flectere.

 2. "Blythe, merry," Rudd.

To BOUT, BOWT, v. n. To spring, to leap, S. "bouted up," Rudd. vo. up-boltit.
Lyndsay.

Teut. botten, op-bott-en, to rebound, resilire.

BOUT, s. A sudden jerk in entering or leaving an apartment; a hasty entrance or departure; the act of coming upon one by surprise; S.

BOUTGATE, s.
 1. A circuitous road, a way which is not direct, S. from about, and gait way.
Ross.
 2. A circumvention, a deceitful course, S.
R. Bruce.
 3. An ambiguity, or an equivocation, in discourse.
Bp. Forbes.

BOW, s. A boll; a dry measure, S.
Monroe.

BOW, BOLL, LINTBOW, s. The globule which contains the seed of flax. Bow is the pron. S.
Polwart.

Germ. boll, id. oculus et gemma plantae, caliculus ex quo flos erumpit; Wachter.

BOW, BOWE, s.
 1. The herd in general; whether inclosed in a fold or not.
Douglas.
 2. A fold for cows, S.
Bannatyne Poems.

Su. G. bo, bu, either the herd or the flock; armenta, pecora, grex; Dan. boe, a shed, booth or stall.

BOW, s.
 1. An arch, a gateway, S.
Knox.
 2. The arch of a bridge, S.
Muses Threnodie.

Teut. boghe, id. arcus, concameratio; from bogh-en, flectere; A. S. bog-a, "an arch of a bridge or other building;" Somner.

BOW, s. As applied to a house.
V. Boo.

BOWAND, adj. Crooked.
Douglas.

A. S. bugend, id.

BOWAT, s. A hand-lanthern.
V. Bowet.

BOWBARD, s. A dastard, a person destitute of spirit.
Douglas.

Teut. boeverje, nequitia. Or, shall we rather view it as originally the same with Bumbart, q. v.?

BOWBERT, adj. Lazy, inactive.
Douglas.

BOWDEN, part. pa. Swollen.
V. Boldin.

BOWELHIVE, s. An inflammation of the bowels, to which children are subject, S.
V. Hive, v.
Pennecuik.

BOWES and BILLES, A phrase used by the English, in former times, for giving an alarm in their camp or military quarters.
Knox.

BOWET, BOWAT, s. A hand-lanthern, S. Bowit, A. Bor.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Perhaps from Fr. bougette, a little coffer; if not allied to bougie, a small wax-candle.

BOWGER, s. The puffin, or coulter-neb, a bird; alca arctica, Linn.
Martin.

BOWGLE, s. A wild ox, a buffalo.
Dunbar.

Lat. bucul-us, a young ox.  Hence bugle-horn.

BOWIE, s.
 1. A small barrel or cask, open at one end; S.
Ferguson.
 2. It denotes a small tub for washing, S.
 3. It also sometimes signifies a milk pail, S.
Ramsay.

Fr. buie, a water-pot or pitcher; Cotgr.

Hence,

BOWIEFU', s. The fill of a small tub, S.
J. Nicol.

BOW-KAIL, s. Cabbage, S. so called from the circular form of this plant. For the same reason its Belg. name is buys-kool.
Burns.

Bow-stock, s. The same. "A bastard may be as good as a bow-stock, by a time;" S. Prov.
Kelly.

BOWLAND, part. adj. Hooked, crooked.
Douglas.

Teut. boghel-en, arcuare.  Bowland is just the part. pr. boghelend, contr.

BOWLIE, BOOLIE, adj. Crooked, deformed; Boolie-backit, humpbacked; sometimes applied to one whose shoulders are very round, S
V. Beugle-backed.

Germ. bucklig, Dan. bugelt, id. from bugle, a bunch or hump; and this from bug-en, to bend; Dan. boeyel, crookedness, boeyelig, flexible.

To BOWN, v. a. To make ready.
V. Boun, v.

BOWRUGIE, s. Burgess; the third estate in a Parliament or Convention; in resemblance of Fr. bourgeois.
Wallace.

BOWSIE, adj. Crooked, S.

Fr. bossu, id.

BOWSUNES, s. Obedience.
Wyntown.

A. S. bocsumnesse, obedientia.

BOWT, s.
 1. A bolt, a shaft; in general.
Chron. S. Poet.
 2. A thunderbolt, S.
Ross.

To BOX, v. a. To wainscot, to cover with boards, S.

BOXING, s. Wainscotting; Sir J. Sinclair, p. 170., S.

BRA, BRAE, BRAY, s.
 1. The side of a hill, an acclivity, S.
Barbour.
 2. The bank of a river, S. Breea, A. Bor. id.
 3. A hill, S.
Ross.
 4. Conjoined with a name, it denotes the upper part of a country; as "Bra-mar, Bra-Cat, the Braes of Angus;" S.
Sir J. Sinclair.
To gae down the brae, metaph. to be in a declining state, in whatever sense; to have the losing side, S.

C. B. bre, a mountain, pl. breon, bryn; Gael. bre, bri, brigh, a hill.  Isl. braa, cilium, the brow; whence augnabraa, the eye-brow; and bratt signifies steep, having an ascent.

To BRA, v. n.
 1. To bray.
 2. To make a loud and disagreeable noise.
Douglas.

BRAAL, s. A fragment. "There's nae a braal to the fore," There is not a fragment remaining, Ang.

BRABBLACH, s. The refuse of any thing; as of corn, meat, &c. Fife.

Gael. prabal, id.

BRACE, s. A chimney-piece, a mantle-piece, S.

BRACHELL, s. A dog; properly, one employed to discover or pursue game by the scent.
Wallace.

Alem. brak; Germ. brack, id. canis venaticus, forte investigator; O. Fr. brachez.  Verel. expl. Isl. rakke canis, deriving it from racka, frakka, cursitare.

BRACHEN, (gutt.) BRAIKIN, BRECKEN, s. The female fern, Polypodium filix foemina, Linn.
Burns.

In Smoland in Sweden, the female fern is called braeken; Sw. stotbraakin, id.  In is a termination in Gothic, denoting the female gender.

ROYAL BRACHENS, s. pl. The flowering fern, S.  Osmunda regalis, Linn.
Lightfoot.

BRACKS, s. A disease of sheep.
V. Braxy.

BRAD, part. pa. Roasted.
V. next word.

To BRADE, v. a. To roast.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

A. S. braed-an, id. braedde, assatus.

To BRADE, BRAID, v. n.
 1. To move quickly, to take long steps in rapid succession.
Douglas.
 2. To spring, to start.
Gawan and Gol.
 3. To break out, to issue with violence.
Douglas.
 4. To draw out quickly; used actively, especially with respect to the unsheathing or brandishing of a sword, or other weapon of this kind.
Wallace.

Isl. braad-a, accelerare.  At bregd-a sverde, gladium evaginare vel stringere. A. S. braed-an, exerere, stringere.

BRADE, BRAIDE, s. A start, a spring, a quick motion of the body.
Dunbar.

Isl. bregd, versura.

To BRADE, BRAID, v. a. To attack, to assault; Rudd.

Isl. bregd-a manne nidur, sternere virum.

BRAID, s. Assault, aim to strike.
Douglas.

It is used in a similar sense, O. E.  Isl. bregd, nisus, an attempt, an exertion.

BRADE, adj.; S.
V. Braid.

To BRADE, BRAID, v. a. To turn round.
Gawan and Gol.

Isl. bregd-a, vertere.

To BRADE, BRAID, BREDE, BREED, v. n.
 1. To resemble, to be like in manners; especially as denoting that similarity which characterises the same stock or family; with the prep. of.
Ferguson's S. Prov.
 2. To appear, to be manifest.
Dunbar.

Isl. bregd-a, bregth-a, Su. G. braa, denote the resemblance of children, in dispositions, to their progenitors.  Bregdur barni til aettar, progenitoribus suis quisque fere similis est.

To BRADE, BRAID up, v. a. "To braid up the head," to toss it as a high-mettled horse does, or to carry it high.
Dunbar.

A. S. bred-an, Belg. breyd-en, to extend.

To BRAG, v. a.
 1. To reproach, to upbraid.
Ruddiman.
 2. To defy, S. B.
Morison.

Su. G. brigd-a, exprobrare; Isl. bregd-a, opprobrare.

BRAGING, s. Boasting.
Gawan and Gol.

BRAGWORT, s. Expl. "Mead, a beverage made from the dregs of honey." Gl. Sibb.

Braggot, Gl. Lancash.  C. B. bragod, id.

To BRAID up the burde; marked as used by James I.

BRAID, BRADE, adj.
 1. Broad, S.
Ritson.
 2. Plain, intelligible.
Douglas.

Moes. G. Isl. braid, A. S. bred, latus.

BRAID, BRADE, adv. Widely.
Douglas.

BRAID-BAND, BROAD-BAND, s.
 1. Corn laid out, in the harvest field, on the band, but not bound, is said to be lying in braid-band, S.
 2. To be laid in broad-band, metaph. to be fully exposed.
Z. Boyd.

To BRAIK, v. n. To reach.
V. Braking.
Lyndsay.

BRAIK, s. A threat.
Douglas.

Isl. brak-a, strepo.

BRAIK, BREAK, s. An instrument used in dressing hemp or flax, for loosening it from the core, S.
Watson's Coll.

Teut. braecke, id. malleus stuparius, vulgo linifrangibula.

BRAIK, s. An internal mortification; a disease among sheep, Ang.
V. Braxy.

Su. G. braeck, a defect of any kind.

BRAIKIT, adj. Speckled, S.

Ir. breac, brek, id.

BRAYMEN, s. pl. The name given to those who inhabit the southern declivity of the Grampian hills, S.
D. Buchanan.

BRAIN, s. Voice. "A braw brain," "a strong brain," a powerful voice, Ang.

To BRAINDGE, v. n. "To run rashly forward," S. O.
Burns.

Shall we view this as an oblique sense of Belg. brins-en, to neigh?

BRAYNE, BRANE, adj. Mad, furious.
Douglas.

A. S. brinn-an, to burn, bren, bryne, fervor; whence bryne-adl, a fever; Su. G. braanad, fervor, ardor.

Brayn-wod, Brane-wod, adj. Mad, in a state of insanity.
Wyntown.
V. Brayne and Wod.

BRAIRD, s. The first sprouting of grain.
V. Breer.

To BRAIS, v. a. To embrace.
Dunbar.

Fr. bras, the arm, whence embrace, q. in arms.

BRAIS, s. pl. Snares, gins.
Douglas.

A. S. braegd, figmentum, braegden, fraud; gebraegdas, crafts, frauds, subtile contrivances; Isl.  Su. G. bragd, fraus.

BRAISE, BRAZE, s. The Roach, a fish, S.
Ure.

Sw. brazen, cyprinus brama, bream; Teut. braessem, id. cyprinus latus.

BRAITH, adj. Violent, severe.
Wallace.

Isl.  Su. G. braede, ira, animi fervor.

BRAITHFUL, BREITHFUL, adj. Sharp, violent.
Douglas.

BRAITHLIE, adj. The same with Braithful; or perhaps in the sense of struggling.
Douglas.

Su. G. bryt-a, brott-as, Isl. briot-a, luctare.

BRAITHLY, adv. Violently, with great force.
Wallace.

To BRAK, v. n. To break, S. B.
Ross.

A. S. brac-an, id.  Isl. eg braaka, frango.

BRAKE, s. A large and heavy kind of harrow, chiefly used for breaking in rough ground, S.

To BRAK, v. n. To express great sorrow on any account. One says, "I'm like to brak," S. B.

This is probably allied to Isl. braek, brek, wailing.

BRAK, BRAKE, adj. Somewhat salt, brackish.
Douglas.

Belg. brack, salsus.

BRAKING, s. Puking, reaching, S. B.
Ross.

Teut, braeck-en, to vomit, braecke, nausea.

BRALD, part. pa. Decked, dressed.
Maitland Poems.

Fr. brell-er, to glitter.

BRANDED, part. pa. Bordered, having a margin.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

Germ. braun, Isl. brun, limbus.

BRANDED, BRANNIT, adj. Having a reddish-brown colour, as if singed by fire.
A branded cow is one that is almost entirely brown, S.

Germ. braun, id.

Minstrelsy Bord.

BRANDEN, part. pa. Grilled.
V. Brid.

BRANDNEW, BRENTNEW, a phrase equivalent to spick and span, quite new, S.
Ross.

Teut. brand new, id., from brand, incendium, ustio.

BRANDER, BRANDRETH, s. A gridiron.
Wyntown.

S. brander, A. S. brandred, "a brand-iron;" Dan. brandrith; Teut. brand-roede, brander, fulcrum focarium.

To BRANDER, v. a. To broil on a grid-iron, to grill, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

BRANDRETH.
V. Brander.

BRANDUR, s. A border.
V. Branded.

BRANE, s. Bran, the husks of corn ground.
Dunbar.

BRANEWOD, s. Wood for burning.
Chr. Kirk.

A. S. bryne incendium, and wude, wood.

BRANG, pret. Brought, S.
J. Nicol.

To BRANGLE, v. n.
 1. To shake, to vibrate.
Douglas.
 2. To menace, to make a threatening appearance.
Douglas.
 3. To shake, applied to the mind; to confound, to throw into disorder; used actively.
Godscroft.

Fr. branl-er, to shake; Su. G. brang-as, cum labore perrumpere velle.

BRANGILL, s. A kind of dance.
Douglas.

Fr. branle, "a brawle, or daunce, wherein many men and women move all together;" Cotgr.

BRANIT, part. pa. Brawned; a term formed from E. brawn, the fleshy or musculous part of the body.
Dunbar.

To BRANK, v. a.
 1. To bridle, to restrain.
Godly Sangs.
 2. v. n. To raise and toss the head, as spurning the bridle; applied to horses.
Douglas.
 3. To bridle up one's self.
Maitland Poems.
 4. To prance, to caper.
Ramsay.

Teut. brank-en and proncken, both signify, ostentare se, dare se spectandum; Germ. prang-en, id.; Su. G. prunk-a, superbire.  Wachter gives prang-en, as also signifying, premere, coarctare.

BRANKEN, part. pr. Gay, lively, S. A.
J. Nicol.

BRANKS, s. pl.
 1. A sort of bridle, often used by country people in riding. Instead of leather, it has on each side a piece of wood joined to a halter, to which a bit is sometimes added; but more frequently a kind of wooden noose resembling a muzzle, S.
Montrose's Mem.

Within these few years, an iron bit was preserved in the steeple of Forfar, formerly used, in that very place, for torturing the unhappy creatures who were accused of witchcraft. It was called The Witch's Branks.

Gael. brancas, a halter.  But our word seems originally the same with Teut. pranghe, muyl-pranghe, postomis, pastomis, confibula; instrumentum quod naribus equorum imponitur; Kilian.

 2. Branks, I suspect, is sometimes used in S. as synon. with jugs or pillory.
Howie.

BRANKS, s. pl. A swelling in the chops, S. A. from the compression of the parts, as the chops of a horse are compressed by the branks which he wears; the buffets, S. B.

BRANNOCK, s. The Samlet, or small fish generally known in S. by the name of Par. Branlin, Yorks.

BRASAND, part. pr. Embracing.

Fr. bras, the arm.

Douglas.

To BRASE, BRASS, v. a. To bind, to tie.
Wallace.

Fr. embrass-er, to bind.

BRASERIS, BRASARIS, s. pl. Vambraces, armour for the arms.
Wallace.

Fr. brassar, brassard, brassart, id.; brachiale ferreum; from bras, the arm, Lat. brach-ium.

To BRASH, v. a. To assault, to attack.
V. Bresche.
Sir W. More.

Teut. broes-en, tempestuosum et furentem ventum spirare; or from A. S. beraes-an, impetuose proruere, irruere.

BRASH, BRASHE, s. An effort, an attack, an assault; as E. brush is used.
Muses Thren.

BRASHY, BRAUSHIE, adj. Stormy, S.
J. Nicol.

BRASH, s. A transient attack of sickness; a bodily indisposition of whatever kind, S. Quhither, synon. S. B.
Burns.

The disorder to which children are often subject after being weaned, is called the speaning-brash. We also speak of "a brash of the teeth." This, perhaps, is merely a different sense of the s. as explained above.  Isl. breisk, however, signifies infirm, breiskleike, weakness, G. Andr.

BRASHY, adj. Delicate in constitution, subject to frequent ailments, S.

To BRAST, v. n. To burst.
Douglas.

Brast is used in the same sense by R. Glouc.

BRAT, s.
 1. Clothing in general. The bit and the brat, S. Food and raiment.
Scotch Presb. Eloq.
 2. A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean, S. "Brat, a coarse apron, a rag, Lincolns." Gl. Grose.
 3. Coarse clothing, S.; dudds, synon.

A. S. bratt signifies both pallium and panniculus; "a cloak, a rag," Somner. C. B. brathay, rags.

 4. Scum, S. It does not necessarily signify refuse; but is also applied to the cream which rises from milk, especially of what is called a sour cogue, or the floatings of boiled whey.
Statist. Acc.

BRATCHART, s. A contemptuous term equivalent to E. whelp.
V. Brachell.
Montgomerie.

From Fr. bratchet, a kind of small hound; or immediately formed from Brach.

To BRATH, v. a. To plait straw-ropes round a stack, crossing them at intervals, S. B.

A. S. braed-an, to weave together; Isl. bregd-a, nectere fila in funem.

Brathins, s. pl. The cross ropes of the roof of a thatched house, or stack; also called etherins, Ang.

Isl. bragd, nexus.

BRATHLY, adj. Noisy.
V. Braithlie.

To BRATTYL, BRATTLE, v. n.
 1. To make a clashing or clattering noise, S.
Douglas.
 2. To advance rapidly, making a noise with the feet, S.
Ramsay.

Isl. briot-a, bryt-a, exagitare, hue illucque movere, ut luctantes; Teut. bortel-en, tumultuari.

Brattyl, Brattle, s.
 1. A clattering noise, as that made by the feet of horses, when prancing, or moving rapidly, S.
Ross.
 2. Hurry, rapid motion of any kind, S.
Ramsay.
 3. A short race, S.
Burns.
 4. Fury, violent attack, S.
Burns.

BRAVERY, s. A bravado, a gasconade.
Spotswood.

Fr. braverie, id. from braver, to brave, to play the gallant.

BRAUITIE, s.
 1. A show, a pageant.
Burel.
 2. Finery in dress, S.
V. Braw.
Burel.

Fr. braveté, pour avoir de beaux habits; Gl. Roquefort.

BRAUL, BRAWL, s. The same as Brangle.
Complaynt S.

Fr. bransle, branle.

BRAUSHIE, adj. Stormy.
V. Brash, v.

BRAW, BRA', adj.
 1. Fine, gaily dressed, S.
Morison.

Teut. brauwe, ornatus, bellus; Fr. brave, id.  Isl. braer, nitet, splendet.

 2. Handsome, S.
Burns.
 3. Pleasant, agreeable, S.
A. Nicol.
 4. Worthy, excellent, S. A braw man, a worthy man, S.

Su. G. braf, bonus, praestans. En braf man, the very phrase still used by the vulgar in S.   Germ. brav, id.  Braw is often used adverbially, as conjoined with the copulative: Braw and able, abundantly able for any work or undertaking; Braw and weel, in good health.

Hence,

Brawly, adv. Very well, S. sometimes brawlins, Ang.; browlies, browlins, Aberd.
Journal Lond.

Sw. Han mor braf, He is well, Wideg.

Braws, pl. Fine clothes, one's best apparel, S.
Ross.

Evidently from the adj. sense 1.

BRAWEN, part. pa. Perhaps, boiled.

A. S. browen, coctus.

Polwart.

To BRAWL, v. n. To run into confusion; part. pr. brawland.
Barbour.

Fr. brouill-er, to embroil, to confound. Su. G. bryll-a, perturbare.

BRAWLIT, part. pa. Perhaps marbled, mixed; from the same v.; Fr. brouill-er, to jumble.
L. Scotland's Lament.

BRAWLINS, s. pl. The trailing Strawberry tree, or Bear-berry, S. B. Arbutus uva ursi, Linn. The name is sometimes applied to the fruit of the Vaccinium vitis Idaea, or red bill-berry.

Gael. braoilag denotes a whortleberry.

BRAXY, BRAXES, BRACKS, s.
 1. A disease in sheep, S.
Statist. Acc.

This is also called braik and bracks, Ang.  A. S. breac, rheuma; broc sickness, disease; Su. G. brak, id.

 2. A sheep which has died of disease; also, mutton of this description, S.
Burns.

BRAZE, s. A roach.
V. Braise.

BRAZARS, s. pl. Armour for the arms.
V. Braseris.

To BRE.
V. Biggit.
K. Hart.

BRE, BREE, s. The eye-brow, S. B.
Douglas.
"He moved neither ee nor bree; i. e. eye nor eyebrow."
V. Bra.
Ross.

A. S. breg, palpebra; Isl. braa.

BREADBERRY, s. That food of children, which in E. is called pap, S.

Perhaps from bread and A. Bor. berry, to beat; q. "bruised bread."

BREAK, s. A division of land in a farm, S.
Statist. Acc.

To BREAK, v. a. To disappoint, S. B. "I'se no break you, I shall not disappoint you," Shirr. Gl.

Isl. bregd-a, frustrari aliquem.

BREAK (of a hill) s. A hollow in a hill, S.

Isl. breck-a, crepido, declivitas.

BREARDS, s. pl. The short flax recovered from the first tow, by a second hackling. The tow, thrown off by this second hackling, is called backings.
Edin. Courant.

To BREAST, v. n. To spring up or forward; a term applied to a horse, S.
Burns.

From the action of the breast in this effort.

Breast-woddie, s. That part of the harness of a carriage-horse, which goes round the breast, S. B.
V. Rig-Widdie.
Journal Lond.

BRECHAME, BRECHEM, s. The collar of a working-horse, S.
V. Haims.
Bannatyne Poems.

Baurghwan is used in the same sense, A. Bor.  Gael. Ir. braigh, the neck; whence braighaidain, a collar.  The last syllable has more resemblance of Teut. hamme, a collar.

BREDDIT, part. pa. Apparently, wreathed.
Palice of Hon.

A. S. bred-an, Teut. breyd-en, to wreathe.

BREDE, WYNTER-BREDE, s. Provisions for winter.
Douglas.

This may be merely bread.  But Isl. braad is rendered, praeda, esca, carnivori animalis.

BREDIR, s. pl. Brethren.
V. Brodir.

BREDIS.

In Bredis.
V. Abreid.
Houlate.

In brede, as used by Chaucer, is rendered abroad.

BREE, BRIE, S. B. BREW, BROO, S. s.
 1. Broth, soup.
Ross.
"Bree, broth without meal," Gl. Yorks.
 2. Juice, sauce, S.
"Breau is supping meat, or gravy and fat for brewis," Gl. Yorks.
 3. Water; moisture of any kind, S.
Burns.
Thus snaw-brue is melted snow; herring-bree, the brine of a herring-barrel, S.

A. S. briw, Germ. brue, bruhe, id. liquor; q. decoctum, according to Wachter, from brau-en, to boil; Isl. brugg, calida coctio, from brugg-a, coquere.

BREE, s. Hurry, bustle.
Shirrefs.

Su. G. bry, turbare, vexare.

BREE, s. The eye-brow.
V. Bre.

To BREED of, to resemble.
V. Brade.

BREEK, BREIK, s. One leg of a pair of breeches, S. pl. breeks, breiks, breeches.
Godscroft.

Anc. Goth. and Isl. brok; A. S. braec, brec; Su. G. braeckor; C. B. bryccan; Gael. brigis; Ir. broages; Lat. bracca, id.  From this dress, the Romans gave the name of Gallia Braccata to one part of Gaul.

BREELLS, s. pl. Spectacles in general; but more strictly double-jointed spectacles, Clydes.

Germ. brill, Su. G. briller, id. oculi vitrei, L. B. berill-us.

BREER, BRERE, BRAIRD, BREARD, s. The first appearance of grain above ground, after it is sown, S.
A fine breer, an abundant germination.
Ramsay.

A. S. brord, frumenti spicae, "corn new come up, or the spires of corn," Somner.  "Bruart, the blades of corn just sprung up;" Gl. Lancash.

To Breer, Brere, Breard, v. n. To germinate, to shoot forth from the earth; applied especially to grain, S. Brerde, part. pa. Loth, brairded.
Douglas.

Breirding, s. Germination; used metaph. in relation to divine truth.
Rutherford.

BREESSIL, s. The act of coming on in a hurry, Fife.

A. S. brastl, crepitus, strepitus, brastl-ian, crepitare, strepere.  Isl. brys, ardens calor; bryss-a, fervide aggredi.

BREGER, s. One given to broils and bloodshed.
Burel.

Fr. briguer, a quarrelsome, contentious, or litigious person.  The origin is most probably Su. G. brigd-a, litigare.

BREHON, s. The name given to hereditary judges appointed by authority to determine, on stated times, all the controversies which happened within their respective districts. By the Brehon law, even the most atrocious offenders were not punished with death, imprisonment, or exile; but were obliged to pay a fine called Eric.
Dr. Macpherson.

Ir. breathav, breitheav, still signifies a judge.  Bullet supposes that Breth has been used in this sense by the ancient Gauls; whence Vergobret, the name of the supreme magistrate among them.  Ir. Fear go fraith literally signifies the man who judges.

To BREY, v. a. To terrify.
Wyntown.

A. S. breg-an, id. probably allied to Sw. bry, to vex.

To BREID, BREDE, v. n. To resemble.
V. Brade, v. 5.

BREID, s. Breadth. On breid, broad, or in breadth.
Lyndsay.

A. S. braed; Su. G. bredd, id. Brede occurs in O.E.

R. Brunne.

BREYFE, BREVE, s. A writing.
Wyntown.

A. S. braue, literae; Germ. brief, a letter; Isl.  Su. G. bref, epistola, diploma; Fr. brief, breve, a writ.  These are all from Lat. breve.

To Breif, Breve, Breue, Brew, v. a.
 1. To write, to commit to writing.
Palace of Hon.
 2. To compose.
Dunbar.

Alem. gebriaf-an, scribere; Su. G. bebref-wa, literis confirmare.  L. B. breviare, in breves redigere.

BREIRD, s. The surface, the uppermost part, the top of any thing, as of liquids.
Melvill's MS.

Evidently the same with Brerd, q. v.

BREITH, adj. Proceeding from fervour of mind.
V. Braith.

Su. G. braede, ira.

Breithful.
V. Braithful.

BREK, s. Breach. Wattir brek, the breaking out of water.
Douglas.

BREK, s. Uproar, tumult.
Douglas.

Isl. brak, strepitus, tumultus, eg brak-a, strepo, cerpo, Su. G. braak-a; metaph. de molesto quovis labore.

BREME, adj. Furious, Wynt.
V. Brim.

BRENDE, part. pa. Burnt, so as to be thoroughly purified.
V. Burnt Silver.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

BRENE, s. Corslet, habergeon.
V. Birnie.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

BRENT, pret. and part. Burned; S. brunt.
Douglas.

A. S. brenn-ing, burning; Isl. brenn, ardeo.

BRENT, adj. High, straight, upright, S.
Maitland Poems.
It most frequently occurs in one peculiar application, in connexion with brow, as denoting a high forehead, as contra-distinguished from one that is flat.
Douglas.

A. Bor. brant, or brunt, steep.  A brant hill, Northumb.  It is also used in Westmorel. Brent-brow, a steep hill; Su. G. bryn, vertex montis; Isl. brun-a, to lift one's self on high.  Meo judicio bryn notat id, quod ceteris superstat, aut prae aliis eminet; Ihre.  Isl. brun, Germ. aug-braunen, Alem. braane, the eyebrow.  Sw. brant, steep; en brant klippa, a steep rock.

BRENT-NEW, quite new.
V. Brand-new.

BRERD, s. The whole substance on the face of the earth.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. brerd, summum.

To BRERE, v. n. To germinate.
V. Breer.

BRESCHE, s. An attack.
Knox.

Su. G. brask-a, sonitum edere, tumultum excitare denotat, a simplici brask, sonitus; Ihre.  It may, however, be originally the same with Brash, q. v.

BRESS, pl. Bristles.
Dunbar.

BRESSIE, s. A fish, supposed to be the Wrasse, or Old Wife, Labrus Tinca, Linn.
Sibbald.

Perhaps radically the same with E. wrasse.

BREST, part. pa. Forcibly removed; or as denoting the act of breaking away with violence; for burst.
Douglas.

Breste, to burst. Chaucer.

BRETH, s. Apparently, rage, wrath.
Houlate.

Su. G.  Isl. braede, praeceps ira, furor.  This is probably allied to braad-a, accelerare.

BRETHIR, BRETHER, s. pl. Brethren.
Wyntown.

Isl. and Sw. broeder, brethren.

BRETS, s. pl. The name given to the Welch or ancient Britons, in general; also, to those of Strat-clyde, as distinguished from the Scots and Picts.
Lord Hailes.

Wyntown uses Brettys as the pl.

A. S. Brettas, Britones; Bryt, Brito, Britannus.

BRETTYS, s. A fortification.
Wyntown.

L. B. breteschia, briteschia.  It properly denotes wooden towers or castles: Bretachiae, castella lignea, quibus castra et oppida muniebantur, Gallis Bretesque, breteches; Du Cange.  Perhaps radically allied to Su. G, bryt-a, to contend, to make war.

To BREVE, v. a. To write.
V. Breif.

BREW, s. Broth, soup.
V. Bree.

BREW-CREESH, s. A term expressive of a duty paid to a landholder or superior, which occurs in old law-deeds. It is still used, Aberd. Sometimes it is called Brew-tallow.

BRIBOUR, BRYBOUR, s. A low beggarly fellow.
Bannatyne Poems.

Fr. bribeur, "a beggar, a scrap-craver; also, a greedy devourer;" briber, to beg; and this from bribe, a lump of bread given to a beggar; Cotgr. C. B. briw, brib, a morsel, a fragment.

BRICHT, BRYCHT, A young woman, strictly as conveying the idea of beauty.
Wallace.

Merely a poetical use of the adj. bright; in the same manner as ancient writers used fre, clere, &c.

BRID, BRIDDE, s. A bird, a pullet.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

A. S. brid is used for chicken, as also S. burd.

BRIDLAND, part. pre.
Polwart.

Apparently, q. bridalling, drinking as freely as men do at a bridal.

BRIG, BREG, BRYG, s. A bridge, S. A. Bor. Lancash.
Wallace.

A. S. bricg, brigge, Su. G. brygga, Belg. brug, id.  Ihre views brygga as a diminutive from bro, anc. bru, which has the same meaning.

BRIGANER, s. pl. A robber, S. B.

Evidently from brigand.

Journ. Lond.

BRIL, s. The merry thought of a fowl.
V. Breels.
Sibbald.

Teut. bril, ossiculum circa pectus a specilli similitudine dictum.

BRYLIES, s. pl. Bearberries.
V. Brawlins.

BRIM, BRYM, BREME, adj.
 1. Raging, swelling; applied to the sea.
Bellenden.

Isl. brim, the raging of the sea.  The word is thus defined; Aestus maris, vehementibus procellis littus verberans; Olai Lex. Run.  A. S. brim, brym, salum, aequor, mare, the sea.

 2. Fierce, violent.
Bellenden.
 3. Stern, rugged, applied to the countenance.
Douglas.
 4. Denoting a great degree either of heat or of cold.
Douglas.
Thus, "a brim frost," is still a common phrase for a severe frost, S. B.

Brymly, adv. Fiercely, keenly. Wall. vii. 995.
V. Artailye.

BRIM, s. A cant term for a trull, Loth.

Callander of Craigforth, in some MS. notes, mentions brim, as signifying a scold, S.  This has most probably been the primary sense.

To BRYN, BRIN, BIRN, v. a. To burn.
Barbour.

Su. G. brinn-a, Germ. brenn-an, id.  A. S. bryne, burning.

Brynstane, Brynt-stane, s. Brimstone, sulphur.
Douglas.

A. S. bryn, incendium, and stan, q. lapis incendii seu incendiarius.  Sw. braensten, id.

BRIN, BRINN, s. A ray, a beam, a flash, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

BRINK.
To Brink. Perhaps, inwardly.
Sir Tristrem.

Q. in pectore; Isl.  Su. G. bring-a, pectus.

BRINKIT, part. pa. Perhaps, bronzed.
Bannatyne Poems.

Su. G. brinna, to burn, or braecka, to roast.

BRISKET, BISKET, s. The breast, S.
Morison.

Fr. brichet, id. Perhaps we have the origin of the word in Isl. briosk, Sw. brusk, gristle.  The word in E. denotes "the breast of an animal."  It bears this sense also in S., and is sometimes corr. called briskin.

BRISMAK, s. The name given to Torsk, our Tusk, in Shetland.

BRISSAL, adj. Brittle. Gl. Sibb.

Alem. bruzzi, fragilitas; Otfrid.  Fr. bresiller, rompre, briser, mettre en pièces; Gl. Roquefort.

BRISSEL-COCK, s. Apparently the turkey-cock.
Pitscottie.

Denominated perhaps from its rough and bristly appearance; or q. Brasil-cock, as, according to Pennant, the turkey was unknown to the old world before the discovery of America.  "The first birds of this kind," he supposes, "must have been brought from Mexico."

To BRISSLE, v. a. To broil, &c.
V. Birsle.

To BRIST, BRYST, s. To burst.
Wyntown.

Isl. brest-a, Dan. brist-er, frangi, rumpi, cum fragore (crepitu) dissilire.

BRITH, s. A term which seems to mean wrath or contention.
Gawan and Gol.

Su. G. braede, anger; brigd, controversy; brigd-a, to litigate.

To BRITTYN, BRYTEN, BRETYN, v. a.
 1. To break down, in whatever way.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. To kill; applied both to man and beast.
V. Bertynit.
Douglas.

It is also written bertyn.  A. S. bryt-an, Su. G. bryt-a, Isl. briot-a, frangere.

BRITURE, Houlate iii. 8., is in Bannatyne MS. brit ure.

To BRIZE, v. a. To bruise.
V. Birse.

BROAD-BAND.
V. Braid-band.

To BROCHE, v. a. To prick, to pierce.
Douglas.

Fr. brocher un cheval, to spur a horse, properly to strike him hard with the spurs.

Hence,

Broche, s.
 1. A spit.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. "A narrow piece of wood or metal to support the stomacher," Gl. Sibb.
 3. A wooden pin on which yarn is wound, S.
Douglas.

Evidently the same with Fr. broche, a spit.  Arm. brochen signifies a spit; from broch-a, to pierce, transfigere.

BROCHAN, s. (gutt.) Oat-meal boiled to a consistence somewhat thicker than gruel, S. It differs from crowdie, as this is oat-meal stirred in cold water.
Martin.

Gael. brochan, pottage, also, gruel; C. B. bryhan, a sort of flummery.

BROCHE, BRUCHE, BROACH, s.
 1. A chain of gold, a sort of bulla, or ornament worn on the breast.
Douglas.
 2. A fibula, a clasp, a breast-pin, S.
Muses Threnodie.

Isl. bratz signifies fibūla, Su. G. braz, from Isl. brus-a, to fasten together.  Gael. broiside, a clasp; broisde, a brooch, Shaw.

BROCHT, s. The art of puking.
V. Braking.
Leg. Bp. St Androis.

C. B. brock, spuma.

To BROCK.
V. Brok.

BROCKED, BROAKIT, adj. Variegated, having a mixture of black and white, S. A cow is said to be broakit, that has black spots or streaks, mingled with white, in her face, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

Su. G. brokug, brokig, party-coloured; Ir. breach, speckled; Gael. brucach, speckled in the face.

BROCKLIE, adj. Brittle.
V. Brukyl.

BROD, s. A board, any flat piece of wood, a lid, S. A. Bor. breid, a shelf or board, Ray.

Isl. broth, A. S. braed, bred, id.

To BROD, v. a.
 1. To prick, to job; to spur, S.
Douglas. Complaynt S.
 2. To pierce, used metaph., S.
Ferguson.
 3. To incite, to stimulate; applied to the mind.
Douglas.

Su. G. brodd, cuspis, aculeus; Isl. brodd, the point of an arrow; sometimes the arrow itself, a javelin, any pointed piece of iron or steel; brydd-a, pungere; Ir. Gael. brod-am, to spur, to stimulate.

Brod, Brode, s.
 1. A sharp-pointed instrument; as the goad used to drive oxen forward, S.
Wyntown.
 2. A stroke with a sharp-pointed instrument, S.
Complaynt S.
 3. An incitement, instigation.
Douglas.

Broddit Staff, "A staff with a sharp point at the extremity," Gl. Sibb. Also called a pike-staff, S. This is the same with broggit-staff.

V. Brog.

BRODYRE, BRODIR, s. A brother; pl. bredir, bredyre.
Wyntown.

Isl. brodur, pl. broeder.

Brodir-Dochter, s. A niece, S.
Wyntown.
Brodir-son or brother-son, and sister-son, are used in the same manner; and brother-bairn for cousin, S.

A Swed. idiom. Brorsdotter, niece; brorson, nephew; brorsbarn, the children of a brother.

BROD MALE, BRODMELL, s. The brood brought forth, or littered, at the same time.
Douglas.

From A. S. brod, proles, and mael, tempus; or O. Germ, mael, consors, socius; whence ee-ghe-mael, conjunx, Kilian.

Brod Sow, A sow that has a litter.
Polwart.

To BROG, v. a. To pierce, to strike with a sharp instrument, S.
Acts Ja. I.

Hence broggit staff, mentioned as a substitute for an ax. The term prog-staff is now used in the same sense, q. v.

Brog, s.
 1. A pointed instrument; such as an awl, S.
 2. A job with such an instrument, S.

BROG, BROGUE, s. A coarse and light kind of shoe, made of horse-leather, much used by the Highlanders, and by those who go to shoot in the hills, S.

Ir. Gael. brog, a shoe.

Lord Hailes.

BROGH, s. Ye man bring brogh and hammer for't, i. e. You must bring proof for it, Loth.

In the North of Germany, the phrase burg und emmer is used in a similar sense, as denoting legal security.  Our brogh and Germ. burg both denote suretyship.  The proper meaning of emmer is not known.

To BROGLE, v. a. To prick, Loth. Brog, synon.

BROGUE, s. "A hum, a trick," S.
Burns.

Isl. brogd, astus, stratagemata, Verel. brigd, id.

BROICE. Leg. Broite.
Barbour.

To BROIGH, v. n. To be in a fume of heat; to be in a state of violent perspiration, and panting; Lanerks.
V. Brothe, from which it is probably corr.

BROILLERIE, s. A state of contention.
V. Brulyie.
Godscroft.

Fr. brouillerie, confusion.

BROK, BROCK, BROKS, s. Fragments of any kind, especially of meat; S.
Bannatyne Poems.

Moes. G. ga-bruko, Alem. bruch, id.  Hence also Germ. brocke, a fragment.

To Brok, Brock, v. a. To cut, crumble, or fritter any thing into shreds or small parcels, S.

Apparently formed as a frequentative from break; if not immediately from the s.

BROKAR, s. A bawd, a pimp.
Douglas.

This is merely a peculiar use of E. broker.

BROKYLL, adj. Brittle.
V. Brukyl.

BROKITTIS, s. pl. The same with E. Brocket, a red deer of two years old.

Fr. brocart, id.

Douglas.

BRONCHED, pret. Pierced.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

Probably an error for broched, from Fr. brocher.

BRONDYN, part. pa. Branched.
Houlate.

Fr. brondes, green boughs or branches.

BRONYS, BROUNYS, BROWNIS, s. pl. Branches, boughs.
Douglas.

From the same origin with the preceding word.

To BRONSE, v. n. To overheat one's self in a warm sun, or by sitting too near a strong fire, S.

Isl. bruni, inflammatio, Moes. G. brunsts, incendium.

BRONT, part. pa. Burnt, S. brunt.
V. Bryn, v.
Douglas.

BROO, s. Broth, juice, &c.
V. Bree.

BROODIE, adj.
 1. Prolific; applied to the female of any species, that hatches or brings forth many young; as, a broodie hen, S.
 2. Fruitful, in a general sense, S.
Z. Boyd.

BROOSE, s. A race at country weddings.
V. Bruse.

BROSE, s. A kind of pottage made by pouring water or broth on meal, which is stirred while the liquid is poured, S. The dish is denominated from the nature of the liquid, as water-brose, kail-brose.
Ross.

A. S. ceales briu, kail-broo, S.; briwas niman, to take pottage or brose.

BROT, BROTACH, s. A quilted cloth or covering, used for preserving the back of a horse from being ruffled by the Shimach, on which the pannels are hung, being fastened to a pack-saddle; Mearns.

Isl. brot, plicatura.

To BROTCH, v. a. To plait straw-ropes round a stack of corn, S. B.; synon. Brath, q. v.

Isl. brus-a, to fasten.

BROTHE, s. "A great brothe of sweet," a vulgar phrase used to denote a violent perspiration, S.

The word may be radically the same with froth; or allied to Isl. braede, braedde, liquefacio.

To Brothe, v. n. To be in a state of profuse perspiration, S.
Chron. S. Poet.

BROTEKINS, BROTIKINS, s. pl. Buskins, a kind of half boots.
Lyndsay.

Fr. brodequin, Teut. broseken, a buskin.

BROUDSTER, s. Embroiderer.
V. Browdin.
Pitscottie.

Fr. brod-er, to embroider.

BROUKIT, BROOKED, BRUCKIT, BRUKET, adj. The face is said to be broukit, when it has spots or streaks of dirt on it, when it is partly clean and partly foul. A sheep, that is streaked or speckled in the face, is designed in the same manner.
Burns.

There can be no doubt that this is originally the same with Brocked, Broakit.  We may add to the etymon there given, Dan. broged, variegated; speckled, grisled.

BROW, s. Nae brow, no favourable opinion. "An ill brow," an opinion preconceived to the disadvantage of any person or thing, S.
Mary Stewart.

BROWDIN, BROWDEN, part. pa. Fond, warmly attached, eagerly desirous, having a strong propensity, S.  It often implies the idea of folly in the attachment, or in the degree of it.
Montgomerie.
"To browden on a thing, to be fond of it. North." Gl. Grose.

It may be formed from Belg. broed-en, to brood, to hatch; all creatures being fond of their young.

BROWDYN, part. pa. Embroidered.
Wyntown.

C. B. brod-io, and Fr. brod-er, to embroider.  Isl. brydd-a, pungere, brodd, aculeus.

BROWDIN, part. pa. Expl. "clotted, defiled, filthy," Gl. Sibb.
Chr. Kirk.

Teut. brodde, sordes.

BROWDYNE, part. pa. Displayed, unfurled.
Barbour.

A. S. braed-an, to dilate, to expand.

BROWNIE, s. A spirit, till of late years supposed to haunt some old houses, those, especially, attached to farms. Instead of doing any injury, he was believed to be very useful to the family, particularly to the servants, if they treated him well; for whom, while they took their necessary refreshment in sleep, he was wont to do many pieces of drudgery, S.
Douglas.

Ruddiman seems to think that these spirits were called Brownies, from their supposed "swarthy or tawny colour."  They may be viewed as corresponding with the Swartalfar, i. e. swarthy or black elves of the Edda, as the Liosalfar, or white elves, are analogous to our Fairies.

BROWST, BROWEST, s.
 1. As much malt liquor as is brewed at a time, S.
Burrow Lawes.
 2. Used metaph. to denote the consequences of any one's conduct, especially in a bad sense. This is often called "an ill browst," S.
Kelly.

Isl. brugg-a raed, invenire callida consilia; brugga suik, struere insidias.

Browster, Browstare, s. A brewer, S.
Douglas.

A. S. briw-an, coquere cerevisiam; Teut. brouw-en, id.; Isl. eg brugg-a, decoquo cerevisias.  In the ancient Saxon, the termination ster affixed to a s. masculine, makes it feminine.  Thus, baecestre properly signifies pistrix, "a woman-baker." Somn.

To BRUB, v. a. To check, to restrain, to keep under, to oppress, to break one's spirit by severity, S. B.; allied perhaps to A. Bor. brob, to prick with a bodkin, Gl. Grose.

BRUCHE, s.
V. Broche.

BRUCKIT, adj.
V. Brocked.

BRUCKLE, adj. Brittle.
V. Brukyl.

BRUDERMAIST, adj. Most affectionate; literally, most brotherly.
Dunbar.

BRUE. s.
V. Bree.

BRUGH, BROGH, BROUGH, BURGH, s.
 1. An encampment of a circular form, S. B.

In Lothian, encampments of the circular form are called Ring-forts, from A. S. hring, orbis, circulus.

 2. This name is also given to the stronger sort of houses in which the Picts are said to have resided.
Brand.
 3. A borough. "A royal brugh;" "A brugh of barony," as distinguished from the other, S. B.
V. Burch.
 4. A hazy circle round the disk of the sun or moon, generally considered as a presage of a change of weather, is called a brugh or brogh, S.
Statist. Acc.

A. S. beorg, borh, munimentum, agger, arx, "a rampire, a place of defence and succour," Somner; burg, castellum, Lye.  The origin is probably found in Moes. G. bairgs, mons.

BRUICK, BRUK, s. A kind of boil, S.
Gl. Complaynt.

An inflamed tumour or swelling of the glands under the arm is called a bruick-boil, S. B., pron. as brook.

Isl. bruk, elatio, tumor; expl. of a swelling that suppurates.

To BRUIK, BRUKE, BROOK, v. a. To enjoy, to possess.
Poems Buchan Dial.

A. S. bruc-an, Franc. gebruch-en, Su. G.  Isl. bruk-a, Belg. bruyck-en, Germ. brauch-en, to use.

BRUKYL, BROKYLL, BROKLIE, adj.
 1. Brittle, easily broken, S.
Kelly.
Hamilton.
 2. Metaph. used in relation to the unsettled state of political matters.
Baillie.
 3. It seems to signify soft, pliable, as applied to the mind.
Wyntown.
 4. Fickle, inconstant.
Wallace.
 5. Inconstant, as including the idea of deceit.
King's Quair.
 6. Weak, delicate, sickly, S. B.
 7. Apt to fall into sin, or to yield to temptation.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Teut. brokel, fragilis, from brok-en, frangere; Sw. braeckelig, id.  Germ. brocklicht, crumbling.

Bruckilness, Brokilness, s.
 1. Brittleness, S.
 2. Apparently, incoherence, or perhaps weakness; used metaphorically.
King's Quair.

BRUDY, adj. Prolific.
V. Broodie.
Bellenden.

BRULYIE, BRULYEMENT, s.
 1. A brawl, broil, fray, or quarrel, S.
Ross.
 2. Improperly used for a battle.
Hamilton.

Fr. brouiller, to quarrel; Su. G. bryl-la, foerbrilla, to embroil.

To BRUND, v. n. To emit sparks as a flint does when struck.—It's brundin, the fire flies from it, S. B.

Su. G. brinn-a, to burn.

Brunds, Brundis, Brwndys, s. pl.
 1. Brands, pieces of wood lighted.
Wallace.
 2. It seems to signify the remains of burnt wood, reduced to the state of charcoal, and as perhaps retaining some sparks.
Barbour.
 3. The term is still commonly used in Ang., only with greater latitude.

A. S. brond may be the origin; as in the second sense it merely denotes a firebrand almost entirely burnt out.

BRUS, s. Force, impetus.
Douglas.

Belg. bruyssch-en, to foam or roar like the sea; Su. G. brus-a, sonare; De aquis cum impetu ruentibus aut fluctibus maris; Ihre.

BRUSE, BROOSE, BRUISE, s. To ride the bruse.
 1. To run a race on horseback at a wedding, S., a custom still preserved in the country. Those who are at a wedding, especially the younger part of the company, who are conducting the bride from her own house to the bridegroom's, often set off, at full speed, for the latter. This is called, riding the bruse. He who first reaches the house is said to win the bruse.
Burns.
 2. Metaph., to strive, to contend in whatever way.
R. Galloway.
This means nothing more than riding for the brose, broth or kail, the prize of spice-broth allotted in some places to the victor.

To BRUS, BRUSCH, v. a. To force open, to press up.
Wyntown.

Sicamb. bruys-en, premere, strepere.

To BRUSCH, v. n. To burst forth, to rush, to issue with violence.
V. Brus, s.
Wallace.

BRUSIT, part. pa. Embroidered.
Houlate.

L. B. brusd-us, brust-us, acupictus; Du Cange.

Brusury, s. Embroidery.
Douglas.

BRUSSLE, s. Bustle, Loth.
V. Breessil.

A. S. brastl-ian, strepere.

To BRUST, v. n. To burst.
R. Bruce.

Teut. brost-en, brusten, Sw. brist-a, id.

BRWHS, s. Apparently, the same with Brus.
Wyntown.

To BU, BUE, v. n. To low. It properly denotes the cry of a calf, S.

Lat. boo, —are, id.

BU, BOO, s.
 1. A sound meant to excite terror, S.
Presb. Eloquence.
 2. A bugbear, an object of terror, Ibid.

Belg. bauw, a spectre; C. B. bo, a hobgoblin.

Bu-kow, s. Any thing frightful, as a scarecrow, applied also to a hobgoblin, S.
V. Cow.

From bu, and kow, cow, a goblin.

Bu-man, s. A goblin; the devil, S. used as Bu-kow.

BUB, BOB, s. A. blast, a gust of severe weather.
Douglas.

Allied perhaps to Isl. bobbe, malum, noxae; or E. bob, to beat, as denoting the suddenness of its impulse.

BUBBLY, adj. Snotty, S. A. Bor.

Bubblyjock, s. The vulgar name for a turkey cock, S. synon. Polliecock, S. B.
Grose.

The name seems to have originated from the shape of his comb.

BUCHT, s. A bending; a fold.
V. Bought.

To BUCK, v. n. To push, to butt, Perths.

Alem. bock-en, to strike; Su. G. bock, impulsus.

To BUCK out, v. n. To make a guggling noise.

BUCKER, s. A name given to a species of whale, West of S.
Statist. Acc.

BUCKIE, BUCKY, s.
 1. Any spiral shell of whatever size, S.
Muse's Threnodie.
The Roaring Buckie, Buccinum undatum, Linn. is the common great whelk.

Teut. buck-en, to bow, to bend; as this expresses the twisted form of the shell.

 2. A perverse or refractory person is denominated a thrawn buckie, and sometimes, in still harsher language, a Deil's buckie, S.
Ramsay.

Buckie Ingram, that species of crab denominated Cancer bernardus, Newhaven.

Buckie Prins, A periwinkle; Turbo terebra, Linn. Also called Water-spouts, Loth.

To BUCKLE, v. a. To join two persons in marriage; used in a low or ludicrous sense, S.
Macneill.

Buckle-the-beggars, s. One who marries others in a clandestine and disorderly manner, S.

BUCKTOOTH, s. Any tooth that juts out from the rest, S.

Sibb. derives this from Boks, q. v.  Perhaps allied to Su. G. bok, rostrum.

BUD, s. A gift; generally one that is meant as a bribe.
Acts Ja. I.

C. B. budd, Corn. bud, profit, emolument.  Or shall we view it as formed from A. S. bude, obtulit, q. the bribe that has been offered?

To Bud, Budd, v. a. To endeavour to gain by gifts, to bribe.
Pitscottie.

BUDGE, s. A kind of bill, used in warfare.
Douglas.

O. Fr. bouge, boulge, faucille, serpe; Roquefort.

BUFE, s. Beef, S. B.

Fr. boeuf, id.  Isl. bufe, cattle; from bu, an ox.

To BUFF, v. n. To emit a dull sound, as a bladder filled with wind does, S.
Chr. Kirk.

It played buff, S. It made no impression.

Belg. boff-en, to puff up the cheeks with wind; Fr. bouff-er, id.

To BUFF, v. a. To buff corn, to give grain half thrashing, S.

"The best of him is buft," a phrase commonly used to denote that one's natural strength is much gone, S.

Alem. buff-en, pulsare.

To buff herring, to steep salted herrings in fresh water, and hang them up, S.

Buff, s. A stroke, a blow, S.
Chr. Kirk.

Fr. bouffe, a blow, L. B. buffa, alapa.

To BUFF out, v. n. To laugh aloud, S.

Fr. bouffee, a sudden, violent, and short blast, buff-ir, to spurt.

BUFF, s. Nonsense, foolish talk, S.
Shirrefs.

Teut. beffe, id. nugae, irrisio; Fr. buffoi, vanité; also moquerie.

BUFF, s. Skin. Stript to the buff, stript naked, S.

Perhaps from E. buff, as denoting leather prepared from the skin of a buffalo.

BUFF NOR STYE. He cou'd neither say buff nor stye, S. i. e. "He could neither say one thing nor another." It is also used, but, I suspect, improperly, in regard to one who has no activity; He has neither buff nor stye with him S. B.

Teut. bof, celeusma, a cheer made by mariners.  Stye might be viewed as referring to the act of mounting the shrouds, from Su. G. stig-a, to ascend.

BUFFER, s. A foolish fellow; a term much used among young people, Clydes.

Fr. bouffard, "often puffing, strouting out, swelling with anger," Cotgr.

BUFFETS, s. pl. A swelling in the glands of the throat, Ang. (branks, synon.) probably from Fr. bouffé, swollen.

BUFFETSTOOL, s. A stool with sides, in form of a square table with leaves, when these are folded down, S. Lincolns, id.
A. Douglas.

Fr. buffet, a sideboard; expl. by Roquefort, dressoir, which denotes a board for holding plates without box or drawer.

BUFFIE, BUFFLE, adj. Fat, purfled; applied to the face, S.

Fr. bouffé, blown up, swollen.

BUFFONS, s. pl. Pantomimic dances.

Fr. boufons, those by whom they were performed.

BUG, pret. Built.
V. Big, v.
Minstrelsy Border.

BUGE, s. "Lamb's fur; Fr. agnelin." Rudd.
Douglas.

Fr. bouge, E. buge, id.

BUGGE, s. A bugbear.
V. Boggarde.

BUGGLE, s. A bog, a morass, S. B.

This seems to be merely a dimin. from Ir. and E. bog.

BUGIL, BUGILL, s. A buglehorn.
Douglas.

Q. buculae cornu, the horn of a young cow; or from Teut. boghel, Germ. bugel, curvatura.

BUICK, pret. Court'sied; from the v. Beck.
Ross.

To BUIGE, v. n. To bow, to creenge.
Maitland Poems.

A. S. bug-an, to bend.

BUIK, s. The body.
V. Bouk.

BUIK, BUKE, pret. Baked.
Dunbar.

A. S. boc, coxit, from bac-an.

BUIK, BUK, BUKE, s. A book, S.
Dunbar.

Germ. buch, Alem. bouch, Belg. boek, A. S. boc, Moes. G.  Isl.  Su. G. bok, id.  It has been generally supposed, that the Northern nations give this name to a book, from the materials of which it was first made, bok signifying a beech-tree.

Buik-lare, s. Learning, the knowledge acquired by means of a regular education, S.

Buik-lear'd, Book-lear'd, adj. Book-learned, S.
A. Nicol.

Isl. boklaerd-ur, id.

V. Lare, v. and s.

BUIR, Leg. Leuir.
Wallace.

BUISE, To shoot the buise.
Cleland.

Apparently, to swing, to be hanged; perhaps from Ital. busco, the shoot of a tree.

BUIST, s. A part of female dress, anciently worn in S.
Maitland Poems.

Fr. busq, or buste, plated body, or other quilted thing, worn to make or keep the body straight.  Ital. busto, stays or boddice.

BUIST, BUSTE, BOIST, s.
 1. A box or chest, S. Meal-buist, chest for containing meal.
Acts Ja. II.
 2. A coffin; nearly antiquated, but still sometimes used by tradesmen, Loth.

O. Fr. boiste, Arm. bouest, a box.

To Buist up, v. a. To inclose, to shut up.
Montgomerie.

Buist-maker, s. A coffin-maker, Loth.; a term now nearly obsolete.

BUISTY, s. A bed, Aberd.
Gl. Shirr. used perhaps for a small one, q. a little box.
V. Booshty.

BUITH, s. A shop.
V. Bothe.

BUITING, s. Booty.
Montgomerie.

Fr. butin, Ital. butino, id.

BUITS, s. pl. Matches for firelocks.
Baillie's Lett.

To BUKK, v. a. To incite, to instigate.
Evergreen.

Germ. boch-en, to strike, bock-en, to push with the horn; Su. G. bock, a stroke; Isl. buck-a, calcitrare.

BUK-HID, BUK-HUD, s.
V. Belly-blind.
Henrysone.

This seems to be an old name for some game, probably Blind man's Buff.

BU-KOW, s. Any thing frightful; hence applied to a hobgoblin, S.
V. Bu.

BULDRIE, s. Building, or mode of building.
Burel.

BULYIEMENT, s. Habiliments; properly such as are meant for warfare.
V. Abulyiement.
Ross.

Bulyiements is still used ludicrously for clothing, S.

To BULL, v. n. To take the bull; a term used with respect to a cow. Both the v. and s. are pron. q. bill, S.

Bill-siller, S., is analogous to Teut. bolle-gheld, merces pro admissura tauri.

To BULLER, v. n.
 1. To emit such a sound as water does, when rushing violently into any cavity, or forced back again, S.
Douglas.

Su. G. bullr-a, tumultuari, strepitum edere.

 2. To make a noise with the throat, as one does when gargling it with any liquid, S. guller, synon.
Bellenden.
 3. To make any rattling noise; as when stones are rolled downhill, or when a quantity of stones falls together, S. B.
 4. To bellow, to roar as a bull or cow does, S.; also pron. bollar, Ang.

Isl. baul-a, mugire, baul mugitus.

 5. It is used as v. a. to denote the impetus or act productive of such a sound as is described above.
Douglas.

Buller, Bulloure, s.
 1. A loud gurgling noise, S.
Douglas.
Hence, the Bullers of Buchan, the name given to an arch in a rock, on the coast of Aberdeenshire.

Su. G. buller, strepitus.

 2. A bellowing noise; or a loud roar, S. B.
V. the v.

BULLETSTANE, s. A round stone, S.

Isl. bollut-ur, round; bollut, convexity.

To BULLIRAG, v. a. To rally in a contemptuous way, to abuse one in a hectoring manner, S.

Isl. baul, bol, maledictio, and raegia, deferre, to reproach.

BULLS, s. pl. Strong bars in which the teeth of a harrow are placed, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

Su. G. bol, Isl. bolr, truncus.

BULL-SEGG, s. The great cat-tail or reedmace, Typha latifolia, Linn. S. B.

BULL-SEGG, s. A gelded bull.
V. Segg.

BULTY, adj. Large, Fife.

This may be allied to Teut. bult, gibbus, tuber; Belg. bult, a bunch, bultje, a little bunch; Isl. buld, crassus.

BULWAND, s. The name given to common mugwort, Orkney, Caithn.
Neill.

To BUM, v. n.
 1. To buzz, to make a humming noise; used with respect to bees, S. A. Bor.
J. Nicol.
 2. Used to denote the noise of a multitude.
Hamilton.
 3. As expressing the sound emitted by the drone of a bag-pipe, S.
Ferguson.
 4. Used to denote the freedom of agreeable conversation among friends, S. B.

Belg. bomm-en, to resound; Teut. bomme, a drum.

Bum, s. A humming noise, the sound emitted by a bee, S.,
V. the v.

Bumbee, s. A humblebee, a wild bee that makes a great noise, S. Bumble-bee, id. A. Bor.

Q. the bee that bums.

Bum-Clock, s. A humming beetle, that flies in the summer evenings.
Burns.

BU-MAN, s. A name given to the devil.
V. under Bu.

BUMBARD, adj. Indolent, lazy.

Ital. bombare, a humble-bee.

Dunbar.

Bumbart, s.
 1. The drone-bee, or perhaps a flesh-fly.
Melvill's MS.
 2. A drone, a driveller.
Dunbar.

BUMBAZED, BOMBAZED, adj. Stupified, S.
V. Bazed.
Ross.

Q. stupified with noise; from Teut. bomme, tympanum, and baesen, delirare.

BUMMACK, BUMMOCK, s.
 1. An entertainment anciently given at Christmas by tenants to their landlords, Orkn.
Wallace's Orkn.
 2. A brewing of a large quantity of malt, for the purpose of being drunk at once at a merry meeting.—Caithn.

Isl. bua, parare, and mage socius, q. to make preparation for one's companions; or bo villa, incola, and mage, the fellowship of a village or of its inhabitants.

BUMMIL, BUMMLE, BOMBELL, s. Expl. a drone, an idle fellow.
V. Batie-Bummil.
Burns.

Teut. bommele, fucus.

To BUMMIL, v. a. To bungle; also, as v. n. to blunder, S.
Ramsay.

Bummeler, Bumler, s. A blundering fellow, S.

BUMP, s. A stroke. "He came bump upon me," he came upon me with a stroke, S.

Isl. bomps, a stroke against any object, bomp-a, cita ruina ferri.

BUN, BUNN. s. A sweet cake or loaf, generally one of that kind which is used at the new year, baked with fruit and spiceries; sometimes for this reason called a sweetie-scone, S.
Statist. Acc.

Ir. bunna, a cake.

BUN, s.
 1. The same as E. bum.
Lyndsay.
 2. This word signifies the tail or brush of a hare, Border; being used in the same sense with fud.
Watson's Coll.

Ir. bon, bun, the bottom of any thing; Dan. bund, id.; Gael. bun, bottom, foundation.

BUN, s. A large cask placed in a cart, for the purpose of bringing water from a distance; Ang.

This may be radically the same with S. boyn, a washingtub.

BUNE, BOON, s. The inner part of the stalk of flax, the core, that which is of no use, afterwards called shaws, Ang. Been, id. Morays.

BUNEWAND, s. The cow-parsnip, Heracleum sphondylium, is called Bunwand, S. B.
Montgomerie.

This appears to be of the same meaning with Bunwede, q. v.

BUNG, adj. Tipsy, fuddled; a low word, S.
Ramsay.

Q. Smelling of the bung.

BUNKER, BUNKART, s.
 1. A bench, or sort of low chest serving for a seat.
Ramsay.
 2. A seat in a window, which also serves for a chest, opening with a hinged lid, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.
 3. It seems to be the same word which is used to denote an earthen seat in the fields, Aberd.
Law Case.

A. S. benc, Su. G. baenck, a bench; Isl. buncke, acervus, strues; a heap.

BUNKLE, s. A stranger. "The dog barks, because he kens you to be a bunkle." This word is used in some parts of Angus.

Perhaps originally a mendicant; from Isl. bon, mendicatio, and karl, vulgarly kall, homo.

BUNNERTS, s. pl. Cow-parsnip, S. B. Heracleum sphondylium, Linn.

Perhaps Q. biorn-oert, which in Sw. would be, the bear's wort.

BUNTLING, s. Bantling, E., a bird, S.

BUNWEDE, s. Ragwort, an herb; Senecio jacobaea, Linn. S. binweed; synon. weebow.
Houlate.

This name is also given, S. to the Polygonum convolvulus, which in Sw. is called Binda.

BUR, s. The cone of the fir, S. B.

Su. G. barr denotes the leaves or needles of the pine.

BUR-THRISSIL, s. The spear-thistle, S. Carduus lanceolatus. Bur-thistle, id. A. Bor.

To BURBLE, v. n. To purl.
Hudson.

Teut. borbel-en, scaturire.

BURCH, BWRCH, BUROWE, s. Borough, town.
Dunbar.

Moes. G. baurgs; A. S. burg, burh, buruh, id.

BURD, s. A lady, a damsel.
V. Bird.

BURD, BURDE, s. Board, table.
Dunbar.

Moes. G. baurd, asser, tabula, A. S. bord, id.

Burdclaith, s. A tablecloth, S. Westmorel., id.
Dunbar.

From burd, and claith, cloth.

BURDALANE, s. A term used to denote one who is the only child left in a family; q. bird alone, or, solitary; burd being the pron. of bird.
Maitland MSS.

BURDE, s. Ground, foundation.

Su. G. bord, a footstool.

Bellenden.

BURDE, s. A strip, properly an ornamental salvedge; as a "burde of silk," a salvedge of silk.
Dunbar.

Su. G. borda, limbus vel praetexta; unde silkesborda, cingulum sericum vel limbus; gullbord, limbus aureus; Teut. boord, limbus.

BURDYN, adj. Wooden, of or belonging to boards.
Wallace.

A. S. bord, S. burd, buird, a board, a plank.

BURDING, s. Burden.
V. Birth, Byrth.
Montgomerie.

BURDINSECK.
V. Berthinsek.

BURDIT, part. pa. Stones are said to be burdit, when they split into lamina, S.

Perhaps from burd, a board; q. like wood divided into thin planks.

BURDLY, BUIRDLY, adj. Large and well-made, S. The E. word stately is used as synon.
Burns.

Isl. burdur, the habit of body, strength, propriae vires; afburdur menn, excellent men.

BURDON, BURDOUN, BURDOWNE, s.
 1. A big staff, such as pilgrims were wont to carry.
Douglas.

Fr. bourdon, a pilgrim's staff; O. Fr. bourde, a baton; Isl. broddstafur, scipio, hastulus, hastile.

 2. Be staff and burdon; a phrase respecting either investiture or resignation.
Bellenden.

BURDOUN, s. "The drone of a bag-pipe, in which sense it is commonly used in S."
Ruddiman.

Fr. bourdon, id.

BURDOWYS, s. Men who fought with clubs.
Barbour.

Burdare, (Matt. Paris), is to fight with clubs, after the manner of clowns, qui, he says, Anglis Burdons.

BUREDELY, adv. Forcibly, vigorously.
V. Burdly.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

BUREIL, BURAL, adj. Vulgar, rustic.
Wallace.

Chaucer borel, id.; L. B. burell-us, a species of coarse cloth; Teut. buer, a peasant.

BURG of ice, a whale-fisher's phrase for a field of ice floating in the sea, S., most probably from its resemblance of a castle.

BURGENS, s. pl. Burgesses.
Wyntown.

Lat. burgens-es.

BURGEOUN, s. A bud, a shoot.
Douglas.

Fr. burgeon, id.; Su. G. boerja, oriri; Isl. bar, gemma arborum.

BURIAN, s. A mound, a tumulus; or a kind of fortification, S. Aust.
Statist. Acc.

From A. S. beorg, burg, mons, acervus; or byrigenn, byrgene, sepulcrum, monumentum, tumulus.

BURIO, BOREAU, BURRIO, BURIOR, BURRIOUR, s. An executioner.
Bellenden.

Fr. bourreau, id.

BURLAW, BYRLAW, BIRLEY, BARLEY. Byrlaw Court, a court of neighbours, residing in the country, which determines as to local concerns.
Skene. Reg. Maj.

From Belg. baur (boer) a husbandman, and law; or as Germ. bauer, A. S. bur, Isl. byr, signify a village, as well as a husbandman, the term may signify the law of the village or district.

Burlie-Bailie, s. An officer employed to enforce the laws of the Burlaw-courts.
Ramsay.

BURLED, BURLIT, part. pa.
Acts Ja. II.

Does this signify burnt, from Fr. brul-er?

BURLY, s. A crowd, a tumult, S. B.

Teut. borl-en, to vociferate.  Hence E. hurly-burly.

BURLY, BUIRLIE, adj. Stately, strong; as applied to buildings.
Wallace.

Teut. boer, Germ. bauer, a boor, with the termination lic, denoting resemblance.

BURLINS, s. pl. The bread burnt in the oven in baking, S. q. burnlins.

BURN, s.
 1. Water, particularly that which is taken from a fountain or well S.
Ferguson.

Moes. G. brunna, Su. G. brunn, Isl. brunn-ur, Germ. brun, Teut. burn, borne, a well, a fountain; Belg. bornwater, water from a well. A rivulet, a brook. S. A. Bor.

Douglas.

 2. E. bourn.

In this sense only A. S. burn, and byrna, occur; or as signifying a torrent.

 3. The water used in brewing, S. B.
Lyndsay.
 4. Urine, S. B. "To make one's burn," mingere. Germ. brun, urina.

Burnie, Burny, is sometimes used as a dimin. denoting a small brook, S.
Beattie.

To BURN, v. a.
 1. One is said to be burnt, when he has suffered in any attempt. Ill burnt, having suffered severely, S.
Baillie.
 2. To deceive, to cheat in a bargain, S. One says that he has been brunt, when overreached. These are merely oblique senses of the E. v.

BURNET, adj. Of a brown colour.
Douglas.

Fr. brunette, a dark brown stuff formerly worn by persons of quality.

BURNEWIN, s. A cant term for a blacksmith, S.
Burns.
"Burn-the-wind,—an appropriate term," N.

BURNT SILVER, BRINT SILVER, silver refined in the furnace.
Acts Ja. II.

Isl. brendu silfri, id.  Snorro Sturleson shews that skirt silfr, i. e. pure silver, and brennt silfr, are the same.

BURR, BURRH, s. The whirring sound made by some people in pronouncing the letter r; as by the inhabitants of Northumberland, S.
Statist. Acc.

This word seems formed from the sound.

BURRA, s. The most common kind of rush, Orkn.; there the Juncus squarrosus.

BURRACH'D, part. pa. Inclosed.
V. Bowrach'd.

To BURRIE, v. a. To overpower in working, to overcome in striving at work, S. B.

Allied perhaps to Fr. bourrer, Isl. ber-ia, to beat.

BURRY, adj.
Henrysone.

Either rough, shaggy, from Fr. bourru, "flockie, hairie, rugged," Cotgr. or savage, cruel, from Fr. bourreau, an executioner.

V. Burio.

BURROWE-MAIL,
V. Mail.

BURSAR, s. One who receives the benefit of an endowment in a college, for bearing his expences during his education there, S.
Buik of Discipline.

L. B. Bursar-ius, a scholar supported by a pension; Fr. boursier, id. from L. B. bursa, an ark, Fr. bourse, a purse.  Bourse also signifies "the place of a pensioner in a college," Cotgr.

Bursary, Burse, s. The endowment given to a student in a university, an exhibition, S.
Statist. Acc.

BURSIN, BURSTEN, part. pa.
 1. Burst, S.
Lyndsay.
 2. Overpowered with fatigue; or so overheated by exertion as to drop down dead, S.

BUS, s. A bush, S. buss.
V. Busk.
Douglas.

BUSCH, s. Boxwood, S. B.
Douglas.

Belg. bosse-boom, busboom, Fr. bouis, buis, Ital. busso, id.

To BUSCH, v. n. To lay an ambush; pret. buschyt
Wallace.

O. E. bussed.

R. Brunne.

Ital. bosc-are, imbosc-are, from bosco, q. to lie hid among bushes.

Buschement, s. Ambush.
Wallace.

O. E. bussement.

R. Brunne.

To BUSE, BUST, v. a. To inclose cattle in a stall, S. B.

A. S. bosg, bosig, praesepe; E. boose, a stall for a cow, Johns.

To BUSH, v. a. To sheathe, to inclose in a case or box, S.; applied to the wheels of carriages.

Su. G.  Belg. bosse, a box or case of any kind.

BUSH, interj. Expressive of a rushing sound, as that of water spouting out, Tweedd.
J. Nicol.

L. B. bus-bas, a term used to denote the noise made by fire-arms or arrows in battle.

To BUSK, v. a.
 1. To dress, to attire one's self, to deck, S.; bus, A. Bor. id.
Douglas.

Germ. butz-en, buss-en, Belg. bocts-en, Su. G. puts-a, puss-a, ornare, decorare; Germ. butz, buss, ornatus; hence butz frau, a well-dressed woman.

 2. To prepare, to make ready, in general, S.
Sir Tristrem.
 3. v. n. To tend, to direct one's course towards.
Gawan and Gol.
 4. It sometimes seems to imply the idea of rapid motion; as equivalent to rush.
Barbour.

Busking, s. Dress, decoration.
Acts Ja. VI.

BUSK, s. A bush.
Douglas.

Su. G. Isl. buske, Germ. busch, Belg. bosch, frutex.  Ital. bosco, wood.

BUSKENING, s.
Sir Egeir.

Apparently high-flown language, like that used on the stage; from E. buskin, the high shoe anciently worn by actors.

BUSSIN, s. A linen cap or hood, worn by old women, much the same as Toy, q. v. West of S.

Perhaps from Moes. G. buss-us, fine linen, Gr. βυσσινον, id.

BUSSING, s. Covering.
Evergreen.

Perhaps from Germ. busch, fascis, a bundle, a fardel.

BUST, s. A box.
V. Buist.

BUST, BOOST, s. "Tar mark upon sheep, commonly the initials of the proprietor's name," Gl. Sibb.

Perhaps what is taken out of the tar-bust or box.

To BUST, v. a. To powder, to dust with flour, Aberd. Must, synon.

This v. is probably formed from bust, buist, a box, in allusion to the meal-buist.

To BUST, v. a. To beat, Aberd. Isl. boest-a, id.

BUSTINE, adj. "Fustian, cloth," Gl.
Ramsay.

Perhaps it rather respects the shape of the garment; from Fr. buste, "the long, small or sharp-pointed, and hard-quilted belly of a doublet;" Cotgr.

BUSTUOUS, BUSTEOUS, adj.
 1. Huge, large in size.
Douglas.
 2. Strong, powerful.
Lyndsey.
 3. "Terrible, fierce," Rudd.
 4. Rough, unpolished.
Douglas.

Su. G. bus-a, cum impetu ferri; Teut. boes-en, impetuose pulsare.

Bustuousness, s. Fierceness, violence
Douglas.

BUT, prep. Without.
V. Bot.

BUT, adv.
 1. Towards the outer apartment of a house, S.
Dunbar.
 2. In the outer apartment.
Dunbar.
To gae but, to go forward, or into, the outer apartment; sometimes called the but-house, S. It is also used as a prep. Gae but the house, S.
V. Ben.

A. S. bute, buta, Teut. buyten, extra, foras; forth, out of doors.

BUT, s. The outer apartment of a house, S.
Dunbar.

BUT, prep. Besides.
Barbour.

A. S. butan, praeter.

BUT, v. imp. Expressive of necessity, S.
V. Boot.

BUT, s. Let, impediment, S. This is merely the prep. used as a substantive.

BUT AND, prep. Besides.
V. Botand.

BUTER, BUTTER, s. Bittern.
V. Boytour.

BUTT, s.
 1. A piece of ground, which in ploughing does not form a proper ridge, but is excluded as an angle, S.
 2. A small piece of ground disjoined from the adjacent lands.

Fr. bout, end, extremity.  L. B. butta terrae, agellus.

 3. Those parts of the tanned hides of horses which are under the crupper, are called butts, probably as being the extremities, S.

BUTWARDS, adv. Towards the outer part of a room, S. B.
Ross.

BWNIST, adj. Uppermost.
Dunbar.

From boon, contr. from abone, above, corresponding to modern boonmost, uppermost, q. v. Belg. bovenste, id. from boven, above.


C

CA, CAW, s. A walk for cattle, a particular district, S. B.
V. Call, Caw, v.
Ross.

CA, s. A pass or defile between hills, Sutherl.
Statist. Acc.

To CAB, v. a. To pilfer, Loth.

CABARR, s. A lighter.
V. Gabert.
Spalding.

CABBACK, s. A cheese.
V. Kebbuck.

CABBIE, KEBBIE, s. A box, made of laths, narrow at the top, used as a pannier for carrying grain on horseback; one being carried on each side of the horse; Sutherl.
Statist. Acc.

CABBRACH, adj. Rapacious, laying hold of every thing, S. B.
Ross.

CABELD, adj. Reined, bridled.
Dunbar.

Teut. kebel, a rope.

CABIR, KABAR, KEBBRE, s.
 1. A rafter, S.
Douglas.
 2. The same term is used to denote the transverse beams in a kiln, on which grain is laid for being dried, S.

C. B. keibr, Corn. keber, a rafter; Ir. cabar, a coupling; Teut. keper, a beam, a brace.

CABROCH, adj. Lean, meagre; skeebroch, Galloway.
Evergreen.

Ir. Gael. scabar, thin.

CACE, CAIS, s. Chance, accident. On cace, by chance.
Douglas.

Fr. cas, id.

To CACHE, CAICH, CADGE, v. a. To toss, to drive, to shog, S.
Douglas.

Belg. kaats-en, to toss, Ital. cacc-iare, to drive.

CACHE-KOW, s. A cow-catcher, a cow-stealer.
Douglas.

CADDIS, s. Lint for dressing a wound, S.

Gael. cadas, a pledget.

To CADGE.
V. Cache.

CADGELL, s. A wanton fellow.
V. Caigie.

CADIE, s.
 1. One who gains a livelihood by running of errands, or delivering messages; a member of a society in Edinburgh, instituted for this purpose, S.
Ferguson.
 2. A boy; especially as employed in running of errands, or in any inferior sort of work, S.
 3. A young fellow; used in a ludicrous sense, S.
Burns.

Fr. cadet, a younger brother.

CADGY, CADY, adj.
V. Caigie.

CADUC, adj. Frail, fleeting.
Complaynt S.

Fr. caduque, Lat. caduc-us, id.

CAFF, s. Chaff, S.
Ramsay.

A. S. ceaf, Germ, kaf, id. palea.

CAFLIS, pl. Lots.
V. Cavel.

CAHUTE, s.
 1. The cabin of a ship.
Evergreen.
 2. A small or private apartment of any kind.
Douglas.

Germ. kaiute, koiute, Su. G. kaijuta. id.

CAIB, s. The iron employed in making a spade, or any such instrument; Sutherl.

Gael. ceibe, a spade.

Statist. Acc.

CAIF, KAIF, adj. Tame, South of S.

Sw. kufw-a, to tame.

Gl. Sibb.

To CAIGE, CAIDGE, v. n. To wanton, to wax wanton.
Philotus.

Su. G. kaett-jas, lascivire.

Caigie, Caidgy, Cady, Keady, adj.
 1. Wanton, S. Kiddy, Ang.
Lyndsay.
 2. Cheerful, sportive; having the idea of innocence conjoined, S.
Ramsay.

Dan. kaad, Su. G. kaat, salax, lascivus; Isl. kaat-ur, hilaris.

Cadgily, adv. Cheerfully, S.
Ferguson.

CAIK, s. A stitch, a sharp pain in the side, South of S.
Gl. Sibb.

Teut. koeck, obstructio hepatis.

CAIK, s. A cake of oat-meal, S.
Knox.

Caik-Fumler, s. A parasite, a toad-eater; or perhaps, a covetous wretch.
Douglas.

CAIL, s. Colewort, S.
V. Kail.

CAYNE, s. An opprobrious term.
Kennedy.

CAIP, CAPE, s. The highest part of any thing, S.
Hence, caip-stane, the cope-stone, S.

Teut. kappe, culmen.

CAIP, s. A coffin.
Henrysone.

A. S. cofe, cavea.

To CAIR, KAIR, v. a. To drive backwards and forwards, S.  Care, Gl. Sibb.

Isl. keir-a, Su. G. koer-a, vi pellere.

To CAIR, CAYR, v. n. To return to a place where one has been before.
Wallace.

A. S. cerr-an, to return, Belg. keer-en, Germ. ker-en, to turn.

CAIR, CAAR, CARRY, KER, adj. Left. Hence, cair-handit, carry-handit, left-handed, S.
V. Ker.

CAIRD, CARD, KAIRD, s.
 1. A gipsy, one who lives by stealing, S.
Ross.
 2. A travelling tinker, S.
Burns.
 3. A sturdy beggar, S.; synon. with Sornar.
 4. A scold, S. B.

Ir. ceard, ceird, a tinker.

CAIRN, s.
 1. A heap of stones thrown together in a conical form, S.
Pennant.
 2. A building of any kind in a ruined state, a heap of rubbish, S.
Burns.

Gael. Ir. carne, C. B. carneddaw, id.

CAIRT, s. A chart or map.
Burel.

Teut. karte, Fr. carte, id.

CAIRTS, s. pl. Cards, as used in play, S.

Fr. carte, id.

Cairtaris, s. pl. Players at cards.
Knox.

CAIR-WEEDS, s. pl. Mourning weeds, q. "weeds of care."
Dunbar.

To CAIT, v. n.
V. Cate.

CAITCHE, CAICHE, s. A kind of game.
Lyndsay.

Teut. ketsc, ictus pilae, kaets-en, ludere pila.

CALCHEN, s. (gutt.) A square frame of wood, with ribs across it, in the form of a gridiron, on which candle-fir is dried in the chimney, S. B.

Isl. kialke, a sledge, sperru-kialki, rafters.

CALD, CAULD, adj.
 1. Cold, S.
Popular Ball.
 2. Cool, deliberate, not rash in judgment.
Douglas.

Moes. G. kalds, A. S. ceald, Alem. chalt, Isl. kalt, frigidus.

Cald, Cauld, s.
 1. Cold, the privation of heat, S.
Wyntown.
 2. The disease caused by cold, S.

Cauld Coal. He has a cauld coal to blaw at, "He is engaged in work that promises no success," S. Prov.

Caldrife, Cauldrife, adj.
 1. Causing the sensation of cold, S.
Ross.
 2. Very susceptible of cold, S.
 3. Indifferent, cool, not manifesting regard or interest, S.
Ferguson.

Cald, and rife, q. "abounding in cold."

Cauldrifeness, Coldrifeness, s.
 1. Susceptibility of cold, chilness, S.
 2. Coolness, want of ardour, S.
Baillie.

Cauld Steer, Sour milk and meal stirred together in a cold state, S. B.

CALFLEA, s. Infield ground, one year under natural grass; probably thus denominated from the calves being fed on it, Ang.

CALFING, s. Wadding.
V. Colf.

CALICRAT, s. Apparently an emmet or ant.
Burel.

To CALKIL, v. a. To calculate.

Fr. calcul-er, id.

Complaynt S.

To CALL, CA', CAA, CAW, v. a.
 1. To drive, to impel in any direction, S.
Barbour.
 2. To strike, with the prep. at, S.
Sir Egeir.

Dan. kage, leviter verberare.

To Call, Ca', v. n.
 1. To move quickly, S.
Ross.
 2. To go in, or enter, in consequence of being driven, S.
Bord. Minstrelsy.

Call, Caw of the water, the motion of it in consequence of the action of the wind, S.

Caller, s. One who drives horses or cattle under the yoke.
Barry.

CALLAN, CALLAND, CALLANT, s.
 1. A stripling, a lad; "a young calland," a boy, S.
Baillie.
 2. Applied to a young man, as a term expressive of affection, S.
Waverley.
 3. Often used as a familiar term, expressive of affection to one considerably advanced in life, S.
Ramsay.

Fr. gallant, Douglas uses gallandis for juvenes.

CALLOT, s. A mutch or cap for a woman's head, without a border, Ang.

Fr. calotte, a coif.

CALLOUR, CALLER, CAULER, adj.
 1. Cool, refreshing; "a callour day," a cool day, S.
Douglas.
 2. Fresh, not in a state of putridity, S., as callour meat, callour fish, &c.
Bellenden.
 3. Having the plump and rosy appearance of health, as opposed to a sickly look, S. Isl. kalldur, frigidus.

CALOO, CALLOW, CALAW, s. The pintail duck, Anas acuta, Linn. Orkn.
Barry.

CALSAY, s. Causeway, street.
Acts Ja. VI.

CALSHIE, CALSHAGH, adj. Crabbed, ill humoured, S.
Morison.

Isl. kals-a, irridere, kalzug-ur, derisor.

CALMES, CAUMS, s. pl.
 1. A mould, a frame, S.
Acts Ja. VI.
 2. The small cords through which the warp is passed in the loom, S., synon. heddles.
 3. In the caulms, in the state of being framed or modelled, metaph.
Baillie.

Germ. quem-en, quadrare; Su.G. bequaem, Belg. bequaam, fit, meet.

CALSUTER'D, adj. Apparently for calfuter'd, caulked.
Chron. S. Poet.

Fr. calfeutrer, Dan. kalfatre, to caulk.

CALVER, s. A cow with calf, S.

Teut. kalver-koe, id.

CAMBIE-LEAF, s. The water-lily, Nymphaea alba et lutea, Linn. S. B.

CAMDUI, s. A species of trout.
Sibbald.

Gael. cam, crooked, and dubh, black.

CAMY, CAMOK, adj.
 1. Crooked.
Maitland Poems.
 2. Metaph. used to denote what is rugged and unequal.
Douglas.

Ir. Gael. cam, C. B. kam, L. B. cam-us.

CAMLA-LIKE, adj. Sullen, surly; Aberd.
Journ. Lond.

Isl. kamleit-r, id., tetricus.

CAMMERAIGE, CAMROCHE, s. Cambric.
Acts Ja. VI.

Named from Cambray, in Lat. Camerac-um, in Teut. Camerijk.

CAMMON, CAMMOCK, s.
 1. A crooked stick, S.
 2. The game also called Shinty, Perths.

Celt. cambaca, id. Bullet. Gael. caman, a hurling-club.

CAM-NOSED, CAMOW-NOSED, adj. Hook-nosed.
V. Camy.
Polwart.

CAMOVYNE, CAMOWYNE, s. Camomile, S.
Ross.

To CAMP, v. n.
 1. To contend.
V. Kemp.
Melvill's MS.
 2. To romp, Loth.

Germ. kamp-en, certare.

CAMPERLECKS, s. pl. Magical tricks, Buchan; synon. Cantraips.

Perhaps Teut. kaemper, a wrestler, and lek, play, q. jousts, tournaments.

CAMPY, adj.
 1. Bold, brave, heroical; Gl. Sibb.
 2. Ill-natured, contentious, Loth.
V. Camp, v.

CAMPIOUN, s. A champion.
Bellenden.

Ital. campione, id.

CAMPRULY, adj. Contentious, S. A.

Isl. kempa, pugil, and rugla, turbare.

CAMSCHO, CAMSCHOL, adj.
 1. Crooked.
Douglas.
 2. Denoting a stern, grim, or distorted countenance.
Ramsay.
 3. Ill-humoured, contentious, crabbed; Ang.
V. Camy.

CAMSHAUCHEL'D, part. adj.
 1. Distorted, awry, S.
Nicol.
 2. Angry, cross, quarrelsome, S.

Cam, crooked, and shachle, q. v.

CAMSTERIE, CAMSTAIRIE, adj. Froward, perverse, unmanageable, S.

Germ. kamp, battle, and starrig, stiff, q. obstinate in fight.

CAMSTONE, s.
 1. Common compact limestone, S.
 2. White clay, indurated; Loth.

Teut. kalmey-steen.

CAMSTRUDGEOUS, adj. The same with Camsterie; Fife.

Isl. kaempe, miles, and striug, animus infensus.

To CAN, v. a. To know.
Henrysone.

Teut. konn-en, noscere; posse.

Can, Cann, s.
 1. Skill, knowledge, S. B.
Ross.
 2. Ability, S. B.
Ross.

CAN, pret. for Gan, began.
Wallace.

CANALYIE, CANNAILYIE, The rabble, S. Fr. canaille, id.
J. Nicol.

CANDAVAIG, s.
 1. A foul salmon, that has lien in fresh water till summer, without migrating to the sea; Ang.
 2. Used as denoting a peculiar species of salmon, Aberd.
Statist. Acc.

Gael. ceann, head, and dubhach, a black dye.

CANDLEMAS CROWN, A badge of distinction conferred, at some grammar schools, on him who gives the highest gratuity to the rector, at the term of Candlemas, S.
Statist. Acc.

CANE, KAIN, CANAGE, s. A duty paid by a tenant to his landlord in kind; as "cane cheese;" "cane fowls," &c. S.
Ramsay.

L. B. can-um, can-a, tribute, from Gael. ceann, the head.

To Pay the Cain, To suffer severely in any cause, S.
Ritson.

To CANGLE, v. n. To quarrel, to be in a state of altercation, S.
Ramsay.

Isl. kiaenk-a, arridere.

Cangling, s. Altercation, S.
Z. Boyd.

Cangler, s. A jangler, S.
Ramsay.

CANKERT, CANKERRIT, adj. Cross, ill-conditioned, S.
Douglas.

CANNA DOWN, CANNACH, s. Cotton grass, Eriophorum vaginatum, Linn. S.

Gael. cannach, id.

Grant.

CANNA, CANNAE, cannot; compounded of can, v., and na or nae, not, S.
Percy.

CANNAS, CANNES, s.
 1. Any coarse cloth, like that of which sails are made, S. B.

Fr. cannevas, E. canvas.

 2. A coarse sheet used for keeping grain from falling to the ground when it is winnowed by means of a wecht, S. B.

Hence,

Cannes-braid, s. The breadth of such a sheet, S. B.
Ross.
 3. Metaph. the sails of a ship, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

CANNEL, s. Cinnamon.
Statist. Acc.

Fr. cannelle, Teut. Dan. kaneel, Isl. kanal.

Hence,

Cannel-waters, s. pl. Cinnamon waters, S.

CANNELL BAYNE, The collar-bone.
Wallace.

Fr. canneau du col, the nape of the neck.

To CANNEL, v. a. To channel, to chamfer, S.

Fr. cannel-er, id.

CANNIE, KANNIE, adj.
 1. Cautious, prudent, S.
Baillie.
 2. Artful, crafty, S.
Rutherford.
 3. Attentive, wary, watchful, S.
Ramsay.
 4. Frugal, not given to expence, S.
Burns.
 5. Moderate in charges, S.
 6. Useful, beneficial, S.
Ross.
 7. Handy, expert at any business; often used in relation to midwifery, S.
Forbes.
 8. Gentle, so as not to hurt a sore, S.
 9. Soft, easy, as applied to a state of rest, S.
Ramsay.
 10. Slow in motion. "To gang canny," to move slowly; "to caw canny," to drive softly; also, to manage with frugality, S.
Burns.
 11. Soft and easy in motion, S.
 12. Safe, not dangerous. "A canny horse," one that may be rode with safety, S.
Burns.
No canny, not safe, dangerous, S.
Popul. Ball.
 13. Composed, deliberate; as opposed to flochtry, throwther, S.
 14. Not hard, not difficult of execution, S.
Burns.
 15. Easy in situation, snug, comfortable; as "He sits very canny." "He has a braw canny seat," S.
Ramsay.
 16. Fortunate, lucky, S.
Pennecuik.
 17. Fortunate, used in a superstitious sense, S.
R. Galloway.
No canny, not fortunate, applied both to things and to persons.
Ramsay.
 18. Endowed with knowledge, supposed by the vulgar to proceed from a preternatural origin; possessing magical skill, South of S.
Tales Landl.
 19. Good, worthy, "A braw canny man," a pleasant, good-conditioned, or worthy man, S.
Statist. Acc.
 20. Applied to any instrument, it signifies well-fitted, convenient, S. B.
Survey Nairn.

Isl. kiaen, sciens, prudens; callidus, astutus; kaeni, fortis et prudens; from kenn-a, noscere.

Cannie Wife, a midwife, South of S.
Cromek.

Cannily, adv.
 1. Cautiously, prudently, S.
Baillie.
 2. Moderately, not violently, S.
Baillie.
 3. Easily, so as not to hurt or gall, S.
Rutherford.
 4. Gently, applied to a horse obeying the rein, S.
Waverley.

Canniness, s.
 1. Caution, forbearance, moderation in conduct, S.
Baillie.
 2. Crafty management.
Baillie.

CANOIS, CANOS, CANOUS, adj. Gray, hoary. Lat. can-us.
Douglas.

To CANT, v. n. To sing in speaking, to repeat after the manner of recitation, S.

Lat. cant-are, to sing.

To CANT, v. a. To set a stone on its edge, a term used in masonry, S.

Germ. kant-en, id.

To CANT, v. n. To ride at a hand-gallop, S. B. Canter, S.

CANT, adj. Lively, merry, brisk.
Barbour.

Canty, adj. Lively, cheerful; applied both to persons and to things, S.
Burns.

Ir. cainteach, talkative, prattling; Su. G. gant-a, ludificare.

CANTEL, CANTIL, s. A fragment.
Sir Egeir.

Teut. kanteel, pinna, mina, Fr. chantel, a piece broken off from the corner or edge of a thing.

CANTEL, s. The crown of the head, Loth. Teut kanteel, a battlement.

CANTEL, s. A juggling trick.
Houlate.

L. B. cantell-ator, praestigiator, magus.

Cantelein, s. Properly an incantation, used to denote a trick.
Lyndsay.

Lat. cantilen-a, a song.

CANTRAIP, CANTRAP, s.
 1. A charm, a spell, an incantation, S.
Ramsay.
 2. A trick, a piece of mischief artfully or adroitly performed, S.
Waverley.

Isl. gan, gand, witchcraft, or kiaen, applied to magical arts, and trapp, calcatio.

To CAP, v. n. To uncover the head, in token of obeisance; q. to take off one's cap.
Baillie.

To CAP, v. a. To excel, Loth.

Teut. kappe, the summit.

CAP, s. A wooden bowl for containing meat or drink, S.
Ramsay.

Su. G. koppa, cyaphus; Arab. kab, a cup.

Hence, perhaps,

Caps, s. pl. The combs of wild bees, S.

To CAP, v. a.
 1. To seize by violence, to lay hold of what is not one's own, S.
 2. To seize vessels in a privateering way.
Fountainhall.
 3. To entrap, to ensnare.
K. Ja. VI.

Lat. cap-ere, Su. G. kipp-a, rapere.

Caper, s. A pirate; or one who seizes vessels under a letter of marque.
Colvil.

Belg. Su. G. Dan. kapare, a pirate.

To CAP, v. a. To direct one's course at sea.
Douglas.

Teut. kape, signum littorale.

CAPER, KAPER, s. A piece of oatcake and butter, with a slice of cheese on it, Perths.

Gael. ceapaire, id.

CAPERCAILYE, CAPERCALYEANE, s. The mountain cock, Tetrao urogallus, Linn. S.
Bellenden.

Gael. capullecoille, id.

CAPERNOITIE, CAPERNOITED, adj. Crabbed, irritable, peevish, S.
Hamilton.

Isl. kappe, certamen, and nyt-a uti, q. "one who invites strife."

CAPES, s. pl.
 1. The grain which retains the shell, before it is milled, Loth.
 2. The grain which is not sufficiently ground; especially where the shell remains with part of the grain, Loth.
 3. Flakes of meal which come from the mill, when the grain has not been thoroughly dried, S. B.
Morison.

CAPYL, CAPUL, s. A horse or mare.
Douglas.

Gael. capull, Ir. kabbal, C. B. keffyl, Hisp. cavallo, id.

CAPITANE, s. Caption, captivity.
Bellenden.

CAPLEYNE, s. "A steylle capleine," a small helmet.
Wallace.

Germ. kaeplein, from kappe, tegumentum capitis.

To CAPPER, v. a.
 1. To seize ships, to go a-privateering, Ang.
 2. To catch, to seize, violently to lay hold of; used in a general sense, Ang.

Dan. kapre, to exercise piracy.

CAPPIT, adj. Crabbed, ill-humoured, peevish, S.
Philotus.

Isl. kapp, contention, or Flandr. koppe, a spider; as we call an ill-humoured person an ettercap, S.

CAPREL, s. A caper, as in dancing.

Fr. capriole, id.

Polwart.

CAPROWSY, s. A short cloak furnished with a hood.
Evergreen.

Fr. cappe-rosin, a red coloured cloak.

To CAPSTRIDE, v. a. To drink in place of another, to whom it belongs, when the vessel is going round a company, S.

E. cap and stride.

CAPUL, s. A horse.
V. Capyl.

CAR, adj. Left, left-handed.
V. Ker.

CAR, CAAR, s. A sledge, a hurdle, S.

Ir. carr, id.

Wallace.

CARAGE, s.
V. Arage.

CARALYNGIS, s. pl. Dancing.
Houlate.

Fr. caroll-er, to dance, to revel.

CARAMEILE, s. An edible root.
V. Carmele.

CARCAT, CARKAT, CARCANT, s.
 1. A necklace, E. carcanet.
Maitland P.
 2. A pendant ornament of the head.
Watson's Coll.

CARDINAL, s. A long cloak, or mantle, worn by women, S.
Statist. Acc.

To CARE, v. a. To drive.
V. Cair.

CARE-BED LAIR, A disconsolate situation; q. "lying in the bed of care," S. B.
Ross.

CARECAKE, KERCAIK, s. A small cake, baked with eggs, and eaten on Yule-day, in the north of S.
V. Next term.

CARE SONDAY, according to some, that immediately preceding Good Friday, but generally used to signify the fifth in Lent, S.
V. Carlings.
Bellenden.

Germ. kar, satisfactio, from karr-en, ker-en, emendare; or Su. G. kaer-a, to complain.

CARGE, To carge, in charge.
Wallace.

O. Fr. carguer, used as charger.

CARIE, adj. Soft, pliable.
Kelly.

CARYBALD, s.
Maitland Poems.

Perhaps from Fr. charaveau, a beetle.

CARKINING, s. A collar.
V. Carcat.
Houlate.

CARL, CAIRLE, CARLE, CARLL, s.
 1. A man, S. B.

A. S. carl, Isl. karl, O. Teut. kaerla, masculus.

 2. Man, as distinguished from a boy.
Wyntown.
 3. A clown, a boor, S.  A. Bor.
Wyntown.

A. S. ceorl, Isl. karl, Belg. kaerle, rusticus.

 4. One who has the manners of a boor.
Kelly.
 5. A strong man.
Wallace.

Germ. kerl, fortis, corpore robusto praeditus.

 6. An old man, S. A. Bor.
Wyntown.

Su. G. Isl. karl, id.

Carl-crab, s. The male of the black-clawed crab, Cancer pagurus, Linn. S.
Sibbald.

Carl-hemp, s.
 1. The largest stalk of hemp, S. A. Bor.
 2. Used metaph. to denote firmness of mind.
Burns.

Carl-again, To play carl-again, to return a blow, to give as much as one receives, Ang.

Carl and Cavel,
V. Kavel.

Carl-doddie, s. A stalk of rib-grass, S. Plantago lanceolata, Linn.

Doddie, bald.

Carlie, s. A little man, a dimin. from carl, S.
Cleland.

Carlish, Carlitch, adj.
 1. Coarse, vulgar.

A. S. ceorlic, vulgaris.

Dunbar.

 2. Rude, harsh in manners.
Popul. Ball.

Carlin, s.
 1. An old woman, S.
Philotus.
 2. A contemptuous term for a woman, although not far advanced in life, S.
Douglas.
 3. A witch, Loth. Twedd.
Pennecuik.
 4. The last handful of corn cut down in harvest-field, when it is not shorn before Hallowmas, S. B. If before this, it is called the Maiden.

Su. G. kaering, kaerling, anus.

Carlin-heather, s. Fine-leaved heath, Erica cinerea, Linn. S. also called Bell-heather.

Carlin-spurs, s. pl. Needle furze or petty whin, Genista Anglica, Linn., S. B. q. "the spurs of an old woman."

Carlin-teuch, adj. (gutt.) As hardy as an old woman, S. B.

Teuch, S., tough.

CARLING, s. The name of a fish, Fife.; supposed to be the Pogge, Cottus cataphractus, Linn.

CARLINGS, s. pl. Pease birsled or broiled, Ang. according to Sibb. "pease broiled on Care-Sunday."
Ritson.

CARMELE, CARMYLIE, CARAMEIL, s. Heath pease, a root, S. Orobus tuberosus, Linn.
Pennant.

Gael. cairmeal, id.

CARNAIL, adj. Putrid.
Wallace.

Fr. charogneux, putrified, full of carrion, Cotgr.

CARNELL, s. A heap, a dimin. from cairn.
Bellenden.

To CARP, CARPE, v. a.
 1. To speak, to talk, to relate, whether verbally, or in writing.
Wyntown.

O. E. id.

P. Ploughman.
 2. To sing.
Minstrelsy Border.

Lat. carpo, -ere, to cull.

Carping, s. Narration.

O. E. id.

V. the v.

CARRALLES, s. pl. Carols, or songs, sung within and about kirks, on certain days; prohibited by act of Parliament.
V. Caralyngis and Gysar.
Acts Ja. VI.

Carol-ewyn, s. The name given, Perths. to the last night of the year; because young people go from door to door singing carols, for which they get small cakes in return.

CARRITCH, CARITCH, s. The vulgar name for a catechism; more commonly in pl. caritches, S.
Magopico.
 2. Used somewhat metaph.
Ferguson.

CARRY, s. A term used to express the motion of the clouds before the wind, S. B.

CARSE, KERSS, s. Low and fertile land, generally, that which is adjacent to a river, as the Carse of Gowrie, the Carse of Stirling, &c. S.
Barbour.

Su. G. kaerr and Isl. kiar, kaer, both signify a marsh.

Carse is sometimes used as an adj.
Lord Hailes.

CARTAGE, s. Apparently for carcase.
Douglas.

CARTE, s. A chariot, especially one used in war.

Chaucer, carte, id.  Ir. cairt, C. B. kertuyn, A. S. craet, id.

CARTIL, s. A cart-load, Ang.; perhaps contr. from cart and fill or full.

CARTOW, s. A great cannon, a battering piece.
Spalding.

Teut. kartouwe, id.

CARUEL, KERVEL, s. A kind of ship.
Douglas.

Fr. caravelle, id. Teut. kareveel. Hisp. caravela, Isl. karf.

CASCHET, CASHET, s. The fac simile of the king's superscription.
Acts Ja. VI.

From Fr. cachet, a seal. This term has the same signification with caschet, S.

CASEABLE, adj. Naturally belonging to a particular situation or case.
Baillie.

To CASS, v. a. To make void, to annul.
Acts Ja. IV.

Fr. cass-er, id. L. B. cass-are, irritum reddere.

CASS, s.
 1. Chance, accident, O. E. id.
Wallace.
 2. Work, business.
Barbour.

Fr. cas, matter, fact, deed.

CASSIE, CAZZIE, s.
 1. A sort of basket made of straw, S. B.
Brand.
It is also written cosie.
 2. Used in Orkney instead of a corn riddle.
Statist. Acc.

Teut. kasse, capsa, cista, Fr. casse, Ital. cassa, L. B. cassa, id.  Su. G. kasse, reticulum, in quo pisces portantur, &c.

CAST, s.
 1. A twist, a contortion, as, His neck has gotten a cast, or a wrang cast, S.
 2. Opportunity, chance, S.
 3. A turn, an event of any kind, S.
Ross.
 4. Lot, fate.
Hamilton.
 5. Aim, object in view.
Douglas.
 6. Subtle contrivance, wile, stratagem.
Wyntown.
 7. Facility in performing any manual work, such especially as requires ingenuity or expertness, S.
Douglas.
 8. Legerdemain, sleight of hand.
Houlate.
 9. The effect of ingenuity, as manifested in literary works.
Douglas.

C. B. cast signifies a trick, techna; Su. G. kost, modus agendi.

CAST, s.
 1. A district, a tract of country, S.
 2. That particular course in which one travels, S.
Ross.

CAST, s.  A cast of herrings, haddocks, oysters, &c., four in number, S.

Su. G. kast-a, to cast, to throw.  Ett kast sill, quaternio halecum.

To CAST, v. a. To use, to propose, to bring forth. "To cast essonyies," LL. S. to exhibit excuses.

Su. G. kast-a, mittere.

To CAST a clod between persons, to widen the breach between them, S. B.
Ross.

To CAST a stone at one, to renounce all connexion with one, S.

To CAST out, v. n. To quarrel, S.
Ramsay.

To CAST up, v. a. To throw any thing in one's teeth, to upbraid one with a thing, S.
Ross.

To CAST up, v. n.
V. Upcasting.

To CAST Words, to quarrel, S. B.
Wyntown.

Su. G. ordkasta, to quarrel.

CASTELWART, s. The keeper of a castle.
Wyntown.

From castle and ward.

CASTOCK, CASTACK, CUSTOC, s. The core or pith of a stalk of colewort or cabbage; often kail-castock, S.
Journal Lond.

Belg. keest, medulla, cor, matrix arboris, the pith.

CAT and CLAY, the materials of which a mud-wall is constructed, in many parts of S. Straw and clay are well wrought together, and being formed into pretty large rolls, are laid between the different wooden posts by means of which the wall is formed, and carefully pressed down so as to incorporate with each other, or with the twigs that are sometimes plaited from one post to another, S.

CAT and DOG, the name of an ancient sport, S.

It seems to be an early form of Cricket.

CATBAND, s. The name given to the strong hook used on the inside of a door or gate, which being fixed to the wall, keeps it shut.
Act Sedt.

Germ. kette, a chain, and band.

CATCHY, adj. Disposed to take the advantage of another, S. from the E. v. catch.

CATCHROGUE, s. Cleavers or goose-grass, an herb, S. Galiam aparine, Linn.

CATCLUKE, CATLUKE, s. Trefoil; an herb, S. Lotus corniculatus, Linn.
Douglas.

"Named from some fanciful resemblance it has to a cat (cat's) or a bird's foot;" Rudd.  Dan. katte-cloe, a cat's claw or clutch.

To CATE, CAIT, v. n. To desire the male or female; a term strictly applied to cats only.
V. Caige, Caigie.
Colvil.

Su. G. kaat, salax, lascivus, kaett-ias, lascivire.

CATECHIS, s. A catechism.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

CATER, s. Money, S. B. q. what is catered.
V. Catour.
Shirrefs.

CATERANES, KATHERANES, s. pl. Bands of robbers, especially such as came down from the Highlands to the low country, and carried off cattle, corn, or whatever pleased them, from those who were not able to make resistance, S. Kaitrine, Kettrin.
Stat. Rob. II.

Ir. ceatharnach, a soldier, ceatharb, a troop.

CAT-FISH, SEA-CAT, s. The Sea-wolf, S. Anarhicas lupus, Linn.

Sw. haf-kat, i. e. sea-cat.

Sibbald.

CAT-GUT, s. Fucus filum, Orkn.
Neill.

CAT-HARROW, s. "They draw the Cat Harrow; that is, they thwart one another."
Lyndsay.

CATHEL-NAIL, s. The nail by which the body of a cart is fastened to the axle-tree, Fife.

CATINE, s.
Polwart.

CATMAW, s. "To tumble the catmaw," to go topsy-turvy, to tumble, S. B.

CATOUR, s. A caterer, a provider.
Wallace.

O. Teut. kater, oeconomus.

V. Katouris.

CAT-SILLER, s. The mica of mineralogists, S.; the katzen silber of the vulgar in Germany.

CATTER, CATERR, s. Catarrh.
Bellenden.

CATTLE-RAIK, s. A common, or extensive pasture, where cattle feed at large, S.
V. Raik.

From cattle, and raik, to range.

CATWITTIT, adj. Harebrained, unsettled, q. having the wits of a cat, S.

To CAUCHT, v. a. To catch, to grasp.
Douglas.

Formed from the pret. of catch.

To CAVE, KEVE, v. a.
 1. To push, to drive backward and forward, S.
 2. To toss. "To cave the head," to toss it in a haughty or awkward way, S.
Cleland.

To Cave over, v. n. To fall over suddenly, S.
Melvill's MS.

Cave, s.
 1. A stroke, a push, S.
 2. A toss.

Isl. akafr, cum impetu, vehementer.

To Cave, v. a.
 1. To separate grain from the broken straw, after threshing, S. B.
 2. To separate corn from the chaff, S. A.

Teut. kav-en, eventilare paleas; or the v. both as signifying to toss, and to separate, may be viewed as the same with Isl. kaf-a volutare; kafa i heya, to toss, ted, or cave hay.

CAVEL, CAUIL, CAFLE, KAVEL, KEVIL, s.
 1. Expl. "a rod, a pole, a long staff."
Chr. Kirk.

Su. G. kafle, pertica, bacillus; Germ. keule, a club.

 2. A lot, S. keul, S. A.

Hence, "to cast cavels," to cast lots. Cavel, id. Northumb.
Wallace.
 3. By Rudd. cavillis is not only translated lots, but "responses of oracles."
Douglas.
 4. State appointed, allotment in Providence, S. B.
Ross.
 5. A division or share of property, as being originally determined by lot, S. B.
Law Case.

Su. G. Isl. kafle, which primarily means a rod, is transferred to a lot in general.  Teut. kavel, a lot, kavel-en, to cast lots.

To Cavell, v. a. To divide by lot, S. B.
Law Case.

CAVIE, s. A hencoop, S.
J. Nicol.

Teut. kevie, id. aviarium, Lat. cavea.

CAUIS, 3. p. sing. Falls suddenly over.
V. Cave over, v.
Douglas.

CAUITS, s. pl. Apparently, cat-calls. From S. caw, to call.
Henrysone.

CAULD, s. A dam-head, S. A.
Lay Last Minstrel.

Teut. kade, a small bank.

CAULD BARK, "To lie in the cauld bark," to be dead, S. B.
Ross.

Perhaps a corr. of A. S. beorg, sepulchre, q. cold grave.

CAULER, adj. Cool.
V. Callour.

CAULMES.
V. Calmes.

CAUPE, CAUPIS, CAULPES, CALPEIS, s. An exaction made by a superior, especially by the Head of a clan, on his tenants and other dependants, for maintenance and protection, under the name of a benevolence. This was generally the best horse, ox or cow the retainer had in his possession.
Acts Ja. IV.

Isl. kaup denotes a gift; Su. G. koep-a, dare.

CAUPONA, Expl. "a sailor's cheer in heaving the anchor."
Complaynt S.

Fr. à un coup, at once, altogether.

CAUSEY, CAUSAY, s. A street, S.

Teut. kautsije, id.

Douglas.
To keep the causey, or, the crown of the causey, to appear openly, to appear with credit and respectability.
Rutherford.

Causey-Cloaths, s. pl. Dress in which one may appear in public, S.
Baillie.

Causey-Faced, adj. One who may appear in public without blushing, S. B.

Calsay-Paiker, s. A street walker.
V. Paiker.

Causey-Tales, s. pl. Common news, q. street news, S.

CAURE, Calves; the pl. of cauf, a calf. It is commonly used in the West of S.
Popular Ball.

I am assured that the word is the same in Norway. A. S. cealfru, id.

CAUTIONER, s. A surety, a sponsor, S. a forensic term.
Acts Ja. V.

To CAW, v. a. To drive.
V. Call.

CAWK, s. Chalk, S. Caulk, A. Bor.
Wallace.

A. S. cealc, Alem. calc, Dan. Belg. kalck, Isl. kalk, C. B. calch, Lat. calx, id.

CAWKER, s.
 1. The hinder part of a horse's shoe sharpened, and pointed downwards, to prevent the horse from sliding, S.
 2. Metaph. a dram, a glass of ardent spirits, S.

Isl. keikr, recurvus, keik-a, recurvi; as referring to the form of the caulker.

CAWLIE, s. A contemptuous name for a man, S.; pron. like E. cowl.
Cleland.

CAZARD, s. Apparently, an emperor, or Caesar; as the latter is sometimes written Caser.
Chron. S. Poet.

CAZZIE, s. A sort of sack or net made of straw, S. B.
V. Cassie.

To CEIRS, SERS, v. a. To search.
Douglas.

Fr. cherch-er, Ital. cerc-are, id.

CELICALL, adj. Heavenly, celestial.
Douglas.

CENCRASTUS, s. A serpent of a greenish colour, having its speckled belly covered with spots resembling millet-seeds.
Watson's Coll.

Fr. cenchrite, Lat. cenchrus, id.

CEST, CESSIT, pret. Seized.
Wallace.

CH.

Words, of Goth. origin, whether S or E., beginning with ch, sounded hard, are to be traced to those in the Germ. or Northern languages that have k, and in A. S. c, which has the same power with k.

To CHACK, v. n. To clack, to make a clinking noise, S.
Cleland.

To CHACK, v. a. To cut or bruise any part of the body by a sudden stroke; as when the sash of a window falls on the fingers, S.

E. check.  Teut. kack-en, kek-en, increpare; synon. S. B. Chat, q. v.

CHACK, CHATT, s. A slight repast, taken hastily, S.

Q. a check for hunger.

CHACK, CHECK, s. The Wheat-ear, a bird, Orkn. Motacilla oenanthe, Linn.
V. Stane-Chacker.
Barry.

Nearly the same with the last part of its Germ. name, stein schwaker.

CHACKARALLY, s. Apparently some kind of checkered or variegated cloth.
Watson's Coll.

CHACKE-BLYND-MAN, s. Blind man's buff.
Bp. Forbes.

Jockie-blind-man, Angus, id.

CHACKLOWRIE, s. Mashed cabbage, mixed amongst barley-broth, Aberd.

CHAD, s. Gravel, such small stones as form the bed of a river, S. B.

Teut. kade, litus, ora.

Chaddy, adj. Gravelly; as, chaddy ground, that which chiefly consists of gravel, S.

To CHAFF, v. n. To chatter, to be loquacious, Loth.

Teut. keff-en, gannire, latrare.

CHAFTIS, CHAFTS, s. pl. Chops, S.A. Bor. chafts.
Peblis to the Play.

Su. G. kiaeft, kaeft, Isl. kiaft-ur, the jaw-bone.  A. Bor. chafts, chefts, id.  Hence also E. chops.

Chaft-Blade, s. The jaw-bone, S.

Chaft-Talk, s. Talking, prattling, Aberd. from chaft and talk.
Poems Buchan Dial.

To CHAIPE, v. n. To escape.
Wallace.

Fr. eschapp-er, Ital. scapp-are, id.

CHAIPES, CHAPIS, s. pl. Price, rate, established value of goods.
Acts Ja. I.

A. S. ceap, price; from ceap-an, to buy.

To CHAISTIFIE, v. a. To chastise.
Bellenden.

To CHAK, v. a. To check.
Wallace.

Chak, s. The act of checking, stop.
V. Char.

To CHAK, v. n.
 1. To gnash, to snatch at an object with the chops, as a dog does, S.
Douglas.
 2. It expresses the sharp sound made by any iron substance, when entering into its socket; to click, S.
 3. To chak to, to shut with a sharp sound.
Bellenden.

CHAKIL, s. The wrist.
V. Shackle-Bane.
Watson's Coll.

CHALANDRIE, s. Probably, imitations of singing birds.
Burel.

Fr. calandre, a species of lark.

CHALDRICK, CHALDER, s. The name given in the Orkney Islands to the Sea-pie, Hoematopus ostralegus, Linn.
Statist. Acc.

Isl. tialldur, id. Pennant's Zool.

CHALMER, s. Chamber.
Douglas.

Chalmer-Glew, s. "Chambering, secret wantonness," Gl. Sibb.
V. Glew.

CHALOUS, Sir Gawan and Sir Gal. i. 11.
V. Cholle.

CHAMBERERE, s. A chamberlain.

Fr. chambrier, id.

King's Quair.

CHAMBRADEESE, s. A parlour; a name still used by some old people, Fife.
V. Deis.

Fr. chambre au dais, a chamber with a canopy.

To CHAMP, v. a. To chop, to mash, S. Chomp, Lancash., to cut things small.

Germ. Belg. kapp-en, id.

Godscroft.

CHAMPIT, adj. Having raised figures, imbossed, diapered.
Palice of Honour.

Teut. schamp-en, radere, scalpere.

CHANCY, adj.
 1. Fortunate, happy, S.
Douglas.

Fr. chanceaux, id.

 2. Foreboding good fortune, S. Any person or thing viewed as inauspicious, is said to be no chancy, S.
Ross.

CHANDLER, CHANLER, s. A candlestick, S.
Ramsay.

Fr. chandelier, a branch for holding candles, used obliquely.  Grose mentions chaundler.

Chanler-Chafted, adj. Lantern-jawed; having chops like a chandler or candlestick, S. B.
Journal Lond.

CHANNEL, s. Gravel, S. (synon. chad) perhaps from channel, the bed of a river.
V. Chingle.

Channelly, adj. Gravelly, S.
Statist. Acc.

To CHANNER, v. n. To fret, to be in a chiding humour, S.
Minstrelsy Border.

CHANOS, adj. Gray.
V. Canois.
Douglas.

CHANTERIS, s. pl. Laics endowed with ecclesiastical benefices.
Bannatyne Poems.

CHAP, s.
 1. A fellow; a contemptuous term; sometimes chappie, or "little chap," S.
Burns.
 2. Like chield, it is also applied to a female, S. B.
Ross.

Su. G. kaeps, keips, kaebs, homo servilis conditionis.

To CHAP, v. a.
 1. To strike with a hammer, or any instrument of similar use, S.

Teut. kapp-en, incidere; Belg. schopp-en, to strike, Sewel.

To Chap hands, to strike hands, especially in concluding a bargain, S.

 2. To chop, to cut into small pieces, S.

Teut. kapp-en, conscindere minutim.

To Chap aff, to strike off.

Su. G. kapp-a, to amputate.

To Chap, v. n.
 1. To strike: "the knock's chappin," the clock strikes, S.
 2. To chap at a door, to knock, to rap, S.
Sir Egeir.

Chap, Chaup, Choppe, s.
 1. A stroke of any kind, a blow, S.
Burns.

Teut. kip, ictus; Moes. G. kaupat-jan, colaphos ingerere.

 2. A tap or rap, S.
Minstrelsy Border.
Z. Boyd uses choppe in the same sense.

Chapping-Sticks, s. Any instrument which one uses for striking with, S.
Kelly.

To CHAP, CHAUP out, CHAUPS, v. a.
 1. To fix upon any person or thing by selection, S. Hence the phrase, Chap ye, chuse ye.
Ramsay.
 2. Suddenly to embrace a proposal made in order to a bargain; to hold one at the terms mentioned, S.

Belg. kipp-en, to choose; which seems only a secondary sense of the v. in Teut. as signifying to lay hold of.

Chap, s. The act of choosing; Chap and choice, great variety, S. B.
Ross.

CHAP, s. A shop.
Many.

CHAPIN, s. Chopin, a quart, S.
Shirrefs.

CHAPYT,
V. Chaipe.

CHAPMAN, s. A pedlar, a hawker, S., a merchant, O. E.
Statist. Acc.

A. S. ceapman, Sw. koepman, a merchant.

CHAR, s. Carriages.
Barbour.

Fr. char, a waggon, a car.

To CHAR, v. a.
 1. To stop.
Douglas.
 2. To char by, to turn aside.
Douglas.

A. S. cerr-an, to turn, to turn from, divertere.

CHAR. On char, to a side.
Douglas.

A. S. cerre, turning, bending, winding.

To CHAR, Char doute. Perhaps, "murmur distrust."
Barbour.

A. S. cear-ian, to complain, to murmur.

CHARBUKILL, s.
 1. A carbuncle.
Douglas.
 2. An ulcer.
Polwart.

Fr. escarboucle, carboucle, the pestilent botch or sore, termed a carbuncle.

CHARD, pret.
V. Chier.

CHARE, s. A chariot.
Douglas.

Fr. char, id.

CHARE, s. Care, charge.
Ross.

Like E. charie, from A. S. car, cura, or cearig, solicitus.

CHARGES, s. pl. Rents.
Buik of Discipline.

Fr. charge, pension, rente.

CHARLEWAN, CHARLEWAYNE, s. The constellation Ursa Major, also called the Plough, S.
Douglas.

A. S. carleaswagn, Su. G. karlwagn, Dan. karlvogn.

CHARNAILL BANDIS, s. pl. Strong hinges used for massy doors or gates, riveted, and often having a plate, on each side of the gate, S. centre-hinges, E.
Wallace.

Fr. charniere, a hinge, a turning joint.

CHARRIS.
V. Char, v.

CHASBOL, CHESBOL, CHESBOWE, s. Poppy.
Complaynt S. Douglas.

CHASE, s. Brak a chase, perhaps, begun a pursuit.
Knox.

CHASS, s. Case, condition.
Wallace.

To CHASTY, v. a. To chastise, to correct.
Barbour.

Fr. chasti-er, id.

To CHAT, v. a. To bruise slightly, S.; synon. chack.

CHAT THE, "Hang thyself;" Rudd.
Douglas.

CHAUDMELLÉEacute;, s. A sudden broil or quarrel.
Skene.

Fr. chaude, hot, and meslée, melée, broil.

CHAUD-PEECE, s. Gonorrhoea.

Fr. chaude-pisse, id.

Polwart.

To CHAW, v. a.
 1. To fret, to gnaw.
Douglas.
 2. To provoke, to vex, S.

O. F. chaloir, to put in pain.

CHEATS, CHITS, s. The sweet-bread. Chits and nears, a common dish in S. i. e. kidneys and sweet-breads.
Watson's Coll.

CHECK, s. A bird.
V. Chack.

CHEEK-BLADE, s. The cheek-bone. S.
Cleland.

CHEESE-HAKE, s. A frame for drying cheeses when newly made, S.
V. Hake.

CHEESE-RACK, s. The same with Cheese-hake, S.
Ferguson.

To CHEIM, v. a. To divide equally; especially in cutting down the backbone of an animal, S. B.

Apparently corr. from the E. v. chine, used in the same sense, from chine, the backbone.  Fr. eschin-er, id.

To CHEIP, CHEPE, v. n.
 1. To peep, to chirp, as young birds in the nest, S. Cheepe, O. E.
Complaynt S.
 2. To squeak with a shrill and feeble voice, S.
Godscroft.
 3. To mutter; applied metaph. to man, S.
Bannatyne Poems.
 4. To creak, S.

Isl. keyp-a, vagire puerorum; keipar, puerorum vagitus.

Cheip, s. This admits of the same various significations as the v. S.

Cheiper, s. The cricket, an insect; denominated from the noise it makes, Loth.

To CHEIPS, v. a. To buy or sell.
Maitland Poems.

A. S. ceap-an, emere, vendere.

To CHEIS, CHEISS, CHES, CHESE,
 1. To choose.
Fordun.
 2. To appoint; used in an oblique sense.
Sir Tristrem.

Moes. G. kes-an, A. S. ceos-an, Belg. kies-en, Su. G. kes-a, id.  Chauc. chese.

CHEITRES, Dunbar, Maitland Poems, p. 48. read chekis.

CHEK, s.
 1. Cheek.
Douglas.
 2. The post of a gate.
Douglas.

CHEKER, CHECKER, s. The exchequer.
Stat. Rob. III.

CHELIDERECT, s. A kind of serpent.
Burel.

Fr. chelydre, Lat. chelydrus, id.

CHEMAGÉ.
V. Chemys.
Wallace.

Chemes hie, i. e. high dwelling, seems the true reading.

CHEMER, s. A loose upper garment.
V. Chymour.
Barbour.

CHEMYS, CHYMES, CHYMMES, CHYMIS, s. A chief dwelling; as the manor-house of a landed proprietor, or the palace of a prince.
Baron Courts.

O. Fr. chefmez, chefmois, the chief mansion-house on an estate; L. B. caput mansi.

CHENYIE, CHENYÉ, s. A chain.
Complaynt S.

CHENNONIS, s. pl. Canons belonging to a cathedral.
Houlate.

To CHEPE, v. n. To chirp.
V. Cheip.

CHESBOW, s. The poppy.
V. Chasbol.

To CHESE, v. a. To choose.
V. Cheis.

CHESYBIL, s. An ecclesiastical dress, O. E. chesuble, a short vestment without sleeves.
Wyntown.

L. B. casubla, Fr. casuble, id. a little cope.

CHESS, s. The frame of wood for a window, a sash, S.

Fr. chassis, id.

To CHESSOUN, v. a. To subject to blame, to accuse.
Priests of Peblis.

Fr. achoisonn-er, id.

CHESSOUN, CHESOWNE, s. Blame, accusation, exception.
Priests of Peblis.

Fr. achoison, accusation.

CHESTER, s. The name given to a circular fortification in some parts of S.
Statist. Acc.

Lat. castra, adopted into A. S. in the form of ceaster, a fort, a castle.

CHESWELL, s. A cheese-vat.
Kelly.

CHEVERON, s. Armour for a horse's head.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

L. B. chamfrenum, Du Cange; Fr. chanfrain, chanfrein.

CHEVIN, part. pa. Succeeded, prospered.
Maitland Poems.

Fr. chevir, to obtain, also to make an end.

CHEWAL, adj. Distorted.
V. Shevel and Showl.
Dunbar.

CHEWALRY, s.
 1. Men in arms, of whatever rank.
Barbour.
 2. Courage, prowess in arms.
Barbour.

Fr. chevalerie, knighthood, transferred to armed men without distinction.   It also signifies prowess.

Chewalrous, adj. Brave, gallant.
Barbour.

O. Fr. chevaleureux, illustris, nobilis.

Chewalrusly, adv. Bravely, gallantly.
Barbour.

To CHEWYS, v. a. To compass, to achieve, to accomplish.
Barbour.

Chewysance, Chewysans, s. Acquirement, provision, means of sustenance.
Wallace.

To CHICK, v. n. To make a clicking noise, as a watch does, S.

Teut. kick-en, mutire, minimam vocem edere.

CHICKENWORT, s. Chickweed, S. Alsine media, Linn.

From chicken and wort, an herb.

CHIEL, CHIELD, s.
 1. A servant.
Chamber-cheil, a servant who waits in a gentleman's chamber, a valet.
Pitscottie.

Su. G. kullt, a boy, kulla, a girl, kulle, offspring.  Or Child, q. v. corr. from O. E. pronounced by the common people in E. Cheild or Cheeld.

 2. A fellow, used either in a good or bad sense, although more commonly as expressive of disrespect, S.
Ramsay.
 3. A stripling, a young man, S. It is applied indifferently to a young man or woman, S. B.
Ross.
 4. An appellation expressive of fondness, S. B.
Ross.

To CHIER, CHEIR, v. a. To cut, to wound.
Chr. Kirk.

A. S. scear-an, scer-an, tondere.  Cheard, which occurs in the same stanza, seems to be the pret. of the v.

CHIERE, s. Chair.
King's Quair.

CHILD, CHYLD, s. A servant, a page.
Wallace.
In O. E., a youth, especially one of high birth, before he was advanced to the honour of knighthood.

A. S. cild; like L. infans, Fr. enfant, Hisp. infant, transferred to the heir apparent of a sovereign.

Childer, pl. Children, S. Lancash.

A. S. cildru, pueri.

Wallace.

CHILD-ILL, s. Labour, pains of child-bearing.
Barbour.

CHYMES, s. A chief dwelling.
V. Chemys.

CHYMOUR, Chymer, s. A light gown, E. cymar.
Maitland Poems.

Fr. chamarre, a loose and light gown. Ital. ciamare, Belg. samare.

CHIMNEY, CHIMLEY, s. A grate, S.
Burrow Lawes.

Corn. tschimbla, a chimney.

Chimley-brace, s. The mantle-piece, S.

Chimla-lug, s. The fire-side, S.

CHINE, s. The end of a barrel, or that part of the staves which projects beyond the head, S.
Acts Cha. I.

Isl. kani, prominula pars rei, that part of a thing that projects, also rostrum, Haldorson. Chine, however, may be corr. from E. chime, chimb, id., especially as Teut. kieme, and kimme, signify margo vasis; and Su. G. kim, extremum dolii.

CHINGLE, s. Gravel, S.
V. Channel.
Statist. Acc.

Chingily, adj. Gravelly, S.
Statist. Acc.

To CHIP, CHYP, v. n.
 1. A bird is said to be chipping, when it cracks the shell. A. Bor. id.
 2. To break forth from a shell or calix, applied to flowers, also to grain when it begins to germinate, S.
Douglas.
 3. Metaph. applied to the preparation necessary to the flight of a person.
Minstrelsy Border.
 4. Transferred to a woman who is in the early state of pregnancy, S.
 5. It is applied to ale when it begins to ferment in the working vat, S. O.

Belg. kipp-en, to hatch, to disclose.

CHYRE, s. Cheer, entertainment.
Dunbar.

To CHIRK, JIRK, JIRG, CHORK, v. n.
 1. To make a grating noise, S.
Popular Ball.
To chirk with the teeth, also actively, to chirk the teeth, to rub them against each other, S.
 2. Used to denote "the noise made by the feet when the shoes are full of water," S.
Ramsay.

A. S. cearc-ian, crepitare, stridere, to gnash, to creak; Chaucer, to chirke.

To CHIRME, v. n.
 1. Used to denote the mournful sound emitted by birds, especially when collected together before a storm, S.
Douglas.
 2. To chirp, without necessarily implying the idea of a melancholy note, S.
Ferguson.
 3. To be peevish, to be habitually complaining, S.

Belg. kerm-en, lamentari, quiritari, Isl. jarmr, vox avium, garritus.

Chyrme, s. Note, applied to birds.
Douglas.

To CHIRT, v. a.
 1. To squeeze, to press out, S.
Douglas.
 2. To act in a griping manner; also, to squeeze or practise extortion, S.

CHIT, s. A small bit of bread, or of any kind of food, S.

To CHITTER, v. n.
 1. To shiver, to tremble, S.
Ramsay.
 2. To chatter. The teeth are said to chitter, when they strike against each other, S.

Teut. tsitter-en, Germ. schutt-ern, to quiver.

CHITTER-LILLING, s. An opprobrious term.
Dunbar.

Perhaps the same as E. chitterlin, the intestines.

To CHIZZEL, v. a. To cheat, to act deceitfully, S. B.  Chouse, E.

Belg. kweezel-en, to act hypocritically.

CHIZZARD.
V. Kaisart.

CHOKKEIS, pronounced chouks, s. pl. The jaws, properly the glandular parts under the jaw-bones, S.
V. Chukis.
Wallace.

Isl. kalke, kialke, maxilla, the jaws, kuok, gula, faux bruti.

Chok-band, s. The small strip of leather by which a bridle is fastened around the jaws of a horse, S.

CHOL, CHOW, s. The jole or jowl.
Evergreen.

A. S. ceole, faucis, ceolas, fauces, the jaws.

Cheek for chow, S. cheek by jole.
Ramsay.

CHOLER, CHULLER, CHURL, s. A double-chin, S.
Journal Lond.

CHOLLE, s. Perhaps the chough.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

To CHORK.
V. Chirk.

To CHORP, v. n. To emit a creaking sound, Loth.

CHOSS, s. Choice.
Barbour.

CHOUKS.
V. Chokkis.

CHOW, s. The jowl.
V. Chol.

CHOWPIS, pret. v. Chops about.
Douglas.

CHOWS, s. pl. A smaller kind of coal, much used in forges, S.; perhaps from Fr. chou, the general name of coal.
Statist. Acc.

To CHOWTLE, CHUTTLE, v. n. To chew feebly, as a child, or an old person does, S.

Isl. jodla, infirmiter mandere.

CHRYSTISMESS, s. Christmas.
Wallace.

CHUCKIE, s. A low or cant term for a hen, S.

Belg. kuyken, a chicken.

Chuckie-Stane, s.
 1. A small pebble, S.

Teut. keyken, a small flint; if not from the circumstance of such stones being swallowed by domestic fowls.

 2. A game, used by girls, in tossing up, and catching pebbles as they fall, is called the Chuckie-stanes.

CHUF, s. Clown.
Maitland Poems.

Evidently the same with Cufe, q. v.

CHUK, s. Asellus marinus.
Sibbald.

CHUKIS, s. pl. Apparently, a swelling of the jaws.
Gl. Complaynt.

A. S. ceacena swyle, faucium tumor.

CHUM, s. Food, provision for the belly, Clydes. Scaff, synon.

CIETEZOUR, s. A citizen.
Bellenden.

CYGONIE, s. The stork.
Burel.

Fr. cicogne, id.

CYNDIRE, s. A term denoting ten swine.
Forrest Lawe.

To CIRCUMJACK, v. n. To correspond with, W. Loth.

CYSTEWS, s. pl. Cistertian monks; Fr. Cistaws.
Wyntown.

CITHARIST, s. The harp.
Houlate.

CITHOLIS, s. A musical instrument.
Houlate.

L. B. citola, Fr. citole, an instrument with cords.

CLAAICK, CLAWICK, s. The autumnal feast, or harvest-home, Aberd.; synon. Maiden. When the harvest is early finished, it is called the Maiden Claaick; when late, the Carlin Claaick.

CLACHAN, CLAUCHANNE, s. A small village, bordering on the Highlands, in which there is a parish-church, S. Elsewhere, it is called the kirk-town.
Acts Ja. VI.

From Gael. clachan, "a circle of stones;" as churches were erected in the same places, which, in times of heathenism, had been consecrated to Druidical worship.

CLACK, s. The clapper of a mill, S.

Teut. klack, sonora percussio.

CLAES, pl. Clothes.
V. Claith.

CLAG, CLAGG, s.
 1. An incumbrance, a burden lying on property; a forensic term, S.
Dallas.
 2. Charge, impeachment of character; fault, or imputation of one, S.
Ritson.

Teut. klaghe, accusatio; Dan. klage, a complaint, a grievance. Or perhaps rather from the same origin with E. clog; q. what lies as a clog on an estate.

To CLAG, v. a. To clog by adhesion, S.
Wallace.

Dan. klaeg, viscous, glutinous, sticky; Isl. kleggi, massa compacta.

Claggy, adj. Unctuous, adhesive, bespotted with mire, S.
V. the v.

Claggock, s. "A dirty wench," Gl. Sibb.
Lyndsay.

CLAHYNNHÉ, CLACHIN. s. Clan or tribe of people living in the same district.
Wyntown.

Gael., Ir. clan, id. Moes. G. klahaim, children.

CLAYIS, s. pl. Clothes, S.
V. Claith.

To CLAIK, v. n.
 1. To make a clucking noise, as a hen does, especially when provoked, S.
 2. To cry incessantly, and impatiently, for any thing, S.
 3. To talk a great deal in a trivial way, S.; to clack, E.
 4. To tattle, to report silly stories, S.

Isl. klak-a, clango, avium vox propria; klack-a, to prattle; Su. G. klaek, reproach.

Claik, s.
 1. The noise made by a hen, S.

Isl. klak, vox avium.

 2. An idle or false report; S.
Morison.

CLAIK, CLAKE, s. The bernacle; Anas erythropus (mas) Linn.
Bellenden.

It seems to have been supposed, that this goose received its name from its claik, or the noise which it makes.

CLAIR, adj.
 1. Distinct, exact, S. B.
Ross.

Fr. clair, evident, manifest, Lat. clarus.

 2. Ready, prepared, S. B. clar, Orkn.

Dan. klar, id.

Pennecuik.

To CLAIR, v. a. To beat, to maltreat.
Polwart.
Clearings is used metaph. both for scolding, and for beating, Clydes.

CLAISE, Clothes.
V. Claith.

CLAITH, CLAYTH, s. Cloth, S., Westmorel.
Abp. Hamiltoun.
Clais, claise, claes, S. pl. Westmorel., also Cumb.

A. S. clath, cloth; clatha, Isl. Su. G. klaede, clothes.

To CLAIVER, v. n. To talk idly or foolishly.
V. Claver.

CLAM, adj.
 1. Clammy, S. Belg. klam, id.
 2. Smooth; as "clam ice," S. B.

CLAM, CLAM-SHELL, s. A scallop shell, S. Ostrea opercularis, Linn.
Sibbald.

Probably from O. Fr. clame, a pilgrim's mantle; as these shells were worn on the cape of their mantles, or on their hats, by those who had made a pilgrimage to Palestine, as a symbol of their having crossed the sea.

CLAMS, s. pl.
 1. Strong pincers used by ship-wrights, for drawing large nails, S. B.
 2. A vice, generally made of wood; used by artificers for holding any thing fast, S.
 3. The instrument, resembling a forceps, employed in weighing gold.
Shirrefs.

Belg. klemm-en, arctare; to pinch.

CLAMEHEWIT, CLAW-MY-HEWIT, s.
 1. A stroke, a drubbing, S.
Ferguson.
 2. A misfortune, Ang.

Qu. claw my heved, or head, scratch my head; an ironical expression.

To CLAMP UP, CLAMPER, v. a. To patch, to make or mend in a clumsy manner, S.
Chron. S. Poet.

Germ. klempern, metallum malleo tundere; klempener, one who patches up toys for children.

To CLAMP, CLAMPER, v. n. To make a noise with the shoes in walking, S.

Clamp, s. A heavy footstep or tread.
Ferguson.

CLANK, s. A sharp blow that causes a noise, S.
Ramsay.

Teut. klanck, clangor.

To Clank, v. a. To give a sharp stroke, S.
Minstrelsy Border.

To Clank down, v. a. To throw down with a shrill sharp noise.
Melvill's MS.

CLANK, s. A catch, a hasty hold taken of any object, S. Claught, synon.
Ross.

To CLAP the HEAD, To commend; conveying the idea of flattery, S.
Ramsay.

CLAP, s. A stroke; Dedis clap, the stroke of death.
Douglas.

Belg. klap, a slap, a box on the ear.

CLAP, s. A moment; in a clap, instantaneously.
Baillie.

The idea is, a clap of the hand; for handclap is used, S. B.

CLAP of the hass, the vulgar designation for the uvula, S.; synon. pap of the hass.

CLAP, s. A flat instrument of iron, resembling a box, with a tongue and handle, used for making proclamations through a town, instead of a drum or hand-bell, S.
Chron. S. Poet.

Teut. klepp-en, pulsare, sonare; Belg. klep, a clapper.

Clapman, s. A public crier, S.

Belg. klapperman, a watchman with a clapper.

CLAPPERS, s. pl. Holes intentionally made for rabbits to burrow in, either in an open warren, or within an inclosure.

Fr. clapier, id. Su. G. klapper, lapides minuti et rotundi.

CLARCHE PIPE.
Watson's Coll.

CLARE, adv. Wholly, entirely, S.
Douglas.

CLAREMETHEN. According to the law of claremethen, any person who claims stolen cattle or goods is required to appear at certain places particularly appointed for this purpose, and prove his right to them, S.
Skene.

From clare, clear, and meith, a mark.

CLARGIE, CLERGY, s. Erudition.
Priests Peblis.

Fr. clergie, id. from Lat. clericus.

To CLARK, v. a. To act as amanuensis, S.

To CLART, v. a. To dirty, to foul, S. Clort, Perths.

Clarts, s. pl. Dirt, mire, any thing that defiles, S.

Hence,

Clarty, adj. Dirty, nasty, S. Clorty, Perths.
Maitland Poems.
Clart. To spread or smear. Clarty; smear'd; A. Bor.

To CLASH, v. n.
 1. To talk idly, S.
Cleland.
 2. To tittle-tattle, to tell tales, S.

Germ. klatschen, id.; klatcherey, idle talk.

Clash, s.
 1. Tittle-tattle, prattle, S.
Satan's Invis. World.
 2. Vulgar fame, the story of the day, S.
Burns.

To CLASH, v. a. To pelt, to throw dirt, S.
Dunbar.

Teut. klets-en, resono ictu verberare; Dan. klatsk-er, to flap.

Clash, s. A blow, a stroke, S.

Germ. klatch, id.

CLASH, s. A heap of any heterogeneous substances, S.

Isl. klase, rudis nexura, quasi congelatio.

CLASH, s. A cavity of considerable extent in the acclivity of a hill, S.

CLASPS, s. pl. An inflammation of the termination of the sublingual gland, a disease of horses, Border.
Watson.

CLAT, s. Used as synon. with clod.
Z. Boyd.

Teut. klotte, kluyte, id. gleba, massa.

To CLAT, CLAUT, v. a.
 1. To rake together dirt or mire, S.
 2. To rake together, in a general sense, S.

Su. G. kladd, filth.

 3. To scrape, to scratch any thing together.
Burns.

Clat, Claut, s.
 1. An instrument for raking together dirt or mire, S.
 2. A hoe, as employed in the labours of husbandry, S.
 3. The act of raking together, as applied to property.
 4. What is scraped together by niggardliness, S.
Burns.

To CLATCH, v. a.
 1. To daub with lime, S.; harle, synon.
 2. To close up with any adhesive substance.

Isl. kleose, kleste, lino, oblino.

Clatch, s. Any thing thrown for the purpose of daubing.

Isl. klessa, any thing that bedaubs.

To CLATCH, SKLATCH, v. a. To finish any piece of workmanship in a careless and hurried way, without regard to the rules of art, S.

Clatch, s. Any piece of mechanical work done in a careless way, S.

CLATH, CLAITH, s. Cloth, S.
V. Claith.

To CLATT, v. a. To bedaub, to dirty, S. Clate, to daub, A. Bor.

Clattie, adj. Nasty, dirty, S. Claity, id., Cumb.
Z. Boyd.

Su. G. kladd, sordes, kladd-a sig ned, se vestesque suas inquinare; Belg. kladd-en, to daub, kladdig, dirty.

To CLATTER, v. a.
 1. To prattle, to act as a tell-tale, S.
Dunbar.
 2. To chat, to talk familiarly, S.

Teut. kletter-n, concrepare.

Clatter, s.
 1. An idle or vague rumour, S.
Hudson.
 2. Idle talk, frivolous loquacity, S.
J. Nicol.
 3. Free and familiar conversation, S.
Shirrefs.

Clatterer, s. A tale-bearer, S.
Lyndsay.

Clattern, s. A tattler, a babbler, Loth.
Ramsay.

CLAUCHANNE, s. A village in which there is a church.
V. Clachan.

CLAUCHT, pret. Snatched, laid hold of eagerly and suddenly.
Douglas.

Su. G. klaa, unguibus veluti fixis prehendere.  This may be viewed as the pret. of the v. Cleik, q. v.

Claucht, Claught, s. A catch or seizure of any thing in a sudden and forcible way, S.
Ross.

To CLAVER, v. a.
 1. To talk idly, or in a nonsensical manner, S. pron. claiver.
Ramsay.
 2. To chat, to gossip, S.
Morison.

Germ. klaffer, garrulus.

Claver, Claiver, s. Frivolous talk, prattle, S.
Ramsay.

CLAVER, CLAUIR, s. Clover, S.
Douglas.

A. S. claefer, Belg. klaver, id. from A. S. cleafan, to cleave, because of the remarkable division of the leaves.

CLAW, s. A kind of iron spoon for scraping the bake-board, Ang.

Teut. klauw-en, scalpere, klauwe, rastrum.

To CLAY, CLAY UP, v. a. To stop a hole or chink by any unctuous or viscous substance, S.
Ferguson.

CLEAVING, s. The division in the human body from the os pubis downwards, S.
V. Clof.
Ramsay.

Isl. klof, femorum intercapedo.

To CLECK, v. a. To hatch.
V. Clek.

CLECKIN-BROD, s. A board for striking with at hand-ball, Loth. Baw-brod, i. e. ball-board, synon.

Isl. klecke, leviter verbero.

To CLEED, CLEITH, v. a.
 1. To clothe, S.
Burns.
 2. Metaph. applied to foliage.
Ferguson.
 3. Used obliquely, to denote the putting on of armour.
Acts Marie.
 4. To seek protection from.
Spalding.

Isl. Su. G. klaed-a, Germ. kleid-en, Belg. kleed-en, Dan. klaed-er, id.

Cleeding, Cleading, s. Clothing, apparel, S.

Germ. kleidung, id.
Ramsay.

Cled Score, A phrase signifying twenty-one in number, S.
Statist. Acc.

Qu. clothed with one in addition.

CLEG, GLEG, s. A gad-fly, a horse-fly. It is pronounced gleg, S. B. cleg, Clydes. A. Bor. id.
Hudson.

Dan. klaeg, id. tabanus.

CLEIK, adj. Lively, agile, fleet, Loth.
V. Cleuch, adj.

To CLEIK, CLEK, CLEEK, v. a. To catch as by a hook, S.
Ramsay.
 2. To lay hold of, after the manner of a hook, S.
 3. To seize, in whatever way, whether by force, or by fraud, S.
Lyndsay.
 4. To cleik up, obliquely used, to raise, applied to a song.
Peblis to the Play.

Isl. hleik-ia, to bind with chains.

Cleik, Clek, s.
 1. An iron hook.
Acts Ja. I.
 2. A hold of any object, S.
 3. The arm, metaph. used.
A. Nicol.

Isl. klakr, ansa clitellarum, hleck-r, an iron chain.

Cleiky, adj. Ready to take the advantage, inclined to circumvent, S.

Cleiks, s. pl. A cramp in the legs, to which horses are subject.
Montgomerie.

CLEYNG, Perhaps, a dark substance.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

To CLEK, CLEKE, v. a.
 1. To hatch, to produce young by incubation, S.
Bellenden.
 2. To bear, to bring forth, S.
Douglas.
 3. To hatch, as applied to the mind, S.
Ramsay.
 4. To feign.
Maitland Poems.

Su. G. klaeck-a, Isl. klek-ia, excludere pullos.

Cleckin, s.
 1. A brood of chickens, S.
 2. Metaph. a family of children, S.

CLEKET, s. The tricker of an engine.
Barbour.

E. clicket, the knocker of a door, Fr. cliquet, id.

To CLEM, v. a.
 1. To stop a hole by compressing, S.
 2. To stop a hole by means of lime, clay, &c.; also to clem up, S.

A. S. cleam-ian, id.

To CLEP, CLEPE, v. a. To call, to name.
Wallace.

A. S. cleop-an, clyp-ian, vocare.

Clep, s. A more solemn form of citation, used especially in criminal cases.
Skene.

To CLEP, v. n.
 1. To act the tell-tale, S.
Ramsay.
 2. To chatter, to prattle; especially, as implying the idea of pertness, S.

Belg. klapp-en, to tattle, to betray.

Clep, s. Tattle, pert loquacity, S.

Belg. ydele klap, idle chat.

CLERGY.
V. Clargie.

CLERK-PLAYIS, s. pl. Properly, those theatrical representations the subjects of which were borrowed from Scripture.
Calderwood.

CLETT, s. A projecting rock or cliff, Caithn.
Statist. Acc.

Isl. klett-ur, rupes mari imminens.

CLEUCH, CLEUGH, (gutt.) s.
 1. A precipice, a rugged ascent, S. B. Heuch, synon.
Wallace.

Ir. cloichs; a rock.

 2. A strait hollow between precipitous banks, or a hollow descent on the side of a hill, S.
Evergreen.

A. S. clough, rima quaedam vel fissura ad montis clivum vel declivum.

CLEUCH, adj.
 1. Clever, dextrous, light-fingered, S. B.
 2. Niggardly and severe in dealing, S. B.

Isl. klok-r, callidus, vafer; Germ. klug, id.

CLEUCK, CLUKE, s.
 1. A claw or talon.
Lyndsay.
 2. Used figuratively for the hand. Hence cair-cleuck, the left hand, S. B.
Morison.

Perhaps a dimin. from Su. G. klo, Teut. klauwe, a claw or talon.

To Cleuck, Cleuk, v. a. To grip, to seize with violence, Aberd.
Forbes.

CLEUE and LAW, Higher and lower part.
Barbour.

Cleue seems to be the same with Germ. kleve, A. S. clif, clivus.

To CLEVER, v. n. To climb, to scramble. A. Bor. id.
King's Quair.

Teut. klaver-en, klever-en, sursum reptare unguibus fixis, Isl. klifr-a, id.

CLEVERUS, adj. Clever.
V. Cleuch.

CLEVIS, Leg. clevir, i. e. clover.
Maitland Poems.

To CLEW, v. n. To cleave, to fasten.

Teut. klev-en, id.

Wyntown.

CLEWIS, s. pl. Claws, talons.
V. Cleuck.
Douglas.

CLIBBER, CLUBBER, s. A wooden saddle, a packsaddle, Caithn. Orkn.
Statist. Acc.

Isl. klifberi, clitellae, from klif, fascis, sarcina, and beri portator.

CLICK-CLACK, s. Uninterrupted loquacity, S.

From E. click and clack, both expressive of a sharp successive noise; or Teut. klick-en, crepitare, klack-en, verberare resono ictu.

CLIFT, s. A spot of ground, S.

A. S. cliof-an, to cleave, because parted from the rest.

To CLINCH, CLYNSCH, v. n. To limp, S.
Douglas.

Su. G. link-a, claudicare.

Clinch, s. A halt, S.

CLINK, s. A smart stroke or blow, S.
Hamilton.

Teut. klincke, id.; alapa, colaphus.

CLINK, s. Money; a cant term, S.
Burns.

From the sound; Teut. klinck-en, tinnire.

To CLINK, v. a. A term denoting alertness in manual operation, S.

To Clink on, v. a. To clap on.
Ramsay.

To Clink up, v. a. To seize any object quickly and forcibly, S.

If not radically the same with the v. cleik, with n inserted; allied perhaps to Dan. lencke a chain, a link, q. gelencke.

CLINT, s. A hard or flinty rock. Gl. Sibb. "Clints. Crevices amongst bare lime-stone rocks, North." Gl. Grose.

Hence,

Clinty, Clynty, adj. Stony, Loth.

Su. G. klint, scopulus.

Douglas.

CLIP, s.
 1. probably borrowed from a sheep newly shorn or clipped.
Evergreen.
 2. A colt of a year old.
Buchan.

To CLIP, CLYP, v. a.
 1. To embrace.
King's Quair.
 2. To lay hold of in a forcible manner.
Douglas.
 3. To grapple in a sea-fight.
Wallace.

A. S. clipp-an, clypp-ian, to embrace.

Clips, Clippys, s. pl.
 1. Grappling-irons, used in a sea-fight.
Wallace.
 2. An instrument for lifting a pot by its ears, S.; or for carrying a barrel.
Ramsay.
 3. Hooks for catching hold of fish, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

CLIPPIE, s. A talkative woman, S. Gl. Sibb.

From Teut. kleps, dicax, or the E. v. clip.

CLIPPS, CLIPPES, s. An eclipse.
Bannatyne Poems.

Clips, pres. v. Suffers an eclipse.
Complaynt S.

CLYRE, s.
 1. "A clyre in meat," a gland, S.

Teut. kliere, id.

 2. "To leave no klyres in one's breast," to go to the bottom of any quarrel or grudge, S.

Clyred, adj. Having tumours in the flesh.
Cleland.

CLISH-CLASH, s. Idle discourse, bandied backwards and forwards, S. apparently a reduplication of clash, q. v.

CLISH-MA-CLAVER, s. Idle discourse, silly talk, S.; a low word.
Ramsay.

CLITTER-CLATTER, s. Idle talk, bandied backwards and forwards, S.
V. Clatter, s. and v.
Cleland.

CLIVACE, s. A hook for catching the bucket in which coals are drawn up from the pit, Loth.

CLOCE.
V. Close.

CLOCHARET, s. The Stonechatter, S. Motacilla rubicola, Linn.
Statist. Acc.

Gael. cloichran, id. from cloich, a stone, and perhaps rann, a song.

To CLOCHER, v. n. To cough; especially as indicating the sound emitted, when there is much phlegm in the throat, S.

Gael. clochar, wheezing in the throat, Shaw.

To CLOCK, CLOK, v. n.
 1. To cluck, to call chickens together.
Douglas.

A. S. clocc-an, Teut. klock-en, glocire.

 2. To hatch, to sit on eggs, S.
Kelly.

CLOCK-BEE, s. A species of beetle, fleeing golach, synon.

CLOD, s. A flat kind of loaf, made of coarse wheaten flour, and sometimes of the flour of pease, S.
Shirrefs.

Qu. resembling a clod of earth.

CLOFF, s.
 1. A fissure of any kind.
 2. What is otherwise S. called the cleaving.

Lat. intercapedo.

Lyndsay.
 3. A cleft between adjacent hills, Loth.
 4. The cleft of a tree, or that part of it where the branches separate from each other, Loth.

Isl. kloff, Su. G. kloffwa, a fissure.

CLOIS, s. Crown.
Douglas.

Teut. klos, globus.

CLOYS, s. A cloister.
Douglas.

Teut. kluyse, clausura, locus clausus, L. B. clusa.

CLOIT, s. A clown, a stupid inactive fellow, S.

Teut. kloete, homo obtusus, hebes.

To CLOIT, v. n. To fall heavily, S.
Hamilton.

Belg. klots-en, to beat with noise.

Cloit, s. A hard or heavy fall, S.

To CLOK, v. n. To cluck.
V. Clock.

CLOLLE, s. Apparently, skull.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

Germ. kleuel, glomus.

CLORTY, adj. Dirty.
V. Clarty.

CLOSE, s. A passage, an entry, S. cloce, Douglas.
Arnot.

Belg. kluyse, clausura.

CLOSERIS, CLOUSOURIS, s. pl. Inclosures.
Douglas.

CLOVE, (of a mill) s. That which separates what are called the bridgeheads, S.
V. Cloff.

Cloves, s. pl. An instrument of wood, which closes like a vice, used by carpenters for holding their saws firm while they sharpen them, S.
V. Cloff.

CLOUYS, s. pl. Claws.
Douglas.

To CLOUR, CLOWR, v. a.
 1. To cause a tumour, S.
Ramsay.
 2. To produce a dimple, S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Clour, s.
 1. A lump, a tumour, in consequence of a stroke or fall, S.
S. P. Repr.
 2. A dint caused by a blow, S.

To CLOUT, v. a. To beat, to strike, properly with the hands, S.
Ferguson.

Teut. klots-en, pulsare.

Clout, s. A cuff, a blow, S.
Ritson.

To CLOW, v. a. To beat down, Galloway.

CLOWE, s. A hollow between hills.
Sir Gawan and Sir Gal.

The same with Cleugh, q. v. also Cloff.

CLOWIS, s. pl. Small round pieces.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. cleow, Teut. klouwe, sphaera.

CLOWIT, part. pa. "Made of clews, woven." Rudd.
Douglas.

Teut. klouwe, glomus.

CLOUSE, CLUSH, s. A sluice, S.
Acts Ja. IV.

Fr. ecluse, id. Arm. clewz, a ditch.

CLUBBER, s.
V. Clibber.

CLUBBOCK, s. The spotted Blenny; a fish, Blennius gunnellus, Linn.
Statist. Acc.

CLUF, CLUIF, s.
 1. A hoof, Rudd., clu, S. B.

Su. G. klof, ungula.

 2. A claw, Rudd.

Teut. kluyve, unguls.

CLUKIS.
V. Cleuck.

CLUMMYN, part. pa. of Climb.
Douglas.

CLUMP, s. A heavy inactive fellow, S.

Su. G. klump, Teut. klompe.

CLUNG, part. pa. Empty, applied to the stomach or belly after long fasting, S.

From E. cling, to dry up.

Ross.

To CLUNK, v. n. To emit a hollow and interrupted sound, as that proceeding from any liquid confined in a cask, when shaken, if the cask be not full, S.

Dan. glunk, the guggling of a narrow-mouthed pot or strait-necked bottle when it is emptying; Sw. klunk-a, to guggle.

CLUNKERS, s. pl. Dirt hardened in clots, so as to render a road, pavement, or floor unequal, S.

Germ. clunkern, a knot or clod of dirt.

CLUTE, s. The half of the hoof of any cloven-footed animal, S.
Ramsay.

Germ. cluft, fissura, or A. S. cleofed, fissus.

CLUTTERING, part. pr. Doing any piece of business in an awkward and dirty way, S. B.

Teut. kleuter-en, tuditare.

COALS, To bring over the coals, to bring to a severe reckoning, S.
Forbes.

Referring, most probably, to the ordeal by fire.

COBLE, KOBIL, s.
 1. A small boat, a yawl, S.

A. S. couple, navicula.

Wyntown.
 2. A larger kind of fishing boat, S.
 3. Malt coble, a place for steeping malt, in order to brewing, S.

Germ. kubel, a vat or tub.

To COBLE, v. a. To steep malt.
Fountainhall.

COBWORM, s. The larva of the Cock-chaffer, Scarabaeus melolontha.
Statist. Acc.

COCK, s. The mark for which curlers play, S.
Burns.

COCK, s. A cap, a head-dress, S. B.
Ross.

COCK AND PAIL, A spigot and faucet, S.

COCKALAN, s. A comic or ludicrous representation.
Acts Ja. VI.

Fr. coq à l'âne, a libel, a pasquin, a satire.

COCKANDY, s. The Puffin, Alca arctica, Linn. S. Tommy-noddy, Orkn.
Sibbald.

COCKERDEHOY. To ride cockerdehoy, to sit on the shoulders of another, in imitation of riding on horseback, S. B.

Fr. coquardeau, a proud fool.

COCKERNONNY, s. The gathering of a young woman's hair, when it is wrapt up in a band or fillet, commonly called a snood, S.
Ramsay.

Teut. koker, a case, and nonne, a nun, q. such a sheath for fixing the hair as the nuns were wont to use.

COCKERSUM, adj. Unsteady in position, threatening to fall or tumble over, S.

Fr. coquarde, a cap, worn proudly on the one side.

COCKY, adj. Vain, affecting airs of importance, S. B. from the E. v. to cock.
Ross.

COCKIELEEKIE, s. Soup made of a cock boiled with leeks, S.

COCKIELEERIE, s. A term expressive of the sound made by a cock in crowing, S.

Teut. kockeloer-en, to cry like a cock.

COCKLAIRD, s. A landholder, who himself possesses and cultivates all his estate, a yeoman, S.
Kelly.

COCKLE, COKKIL, s. A scallop, Fr. coquille.
The Order of the Cockle, that of St Michael, the knights of which wore the scallop as their badge.
Complaynt S.

COCKROSE, s. Any wild poppy with a red flower. Coprose, A. Bor.

COCK-PADDLE, s. The Lump, a fish, Cyclopterus lumpus, Linn., The Paddle, Orkn.
Sibbald.

COCKS. To cast at the cocks, to waste, to squander, S. from the barbarous custom of throwing for a piece of money at a cock tied to a stake.
Ramsay.

COCK-STULE, CUKSTULE, s.
 1. The cucking-stool or tumbrell.
Bur. Lawes.

Teut. kolcken, ingurgitare, or kaecke, the pillory.

 2. This term has accordingly been used, in later times, to denote the pillory, S.
Ramsay.

COD, s. A pillow, S. A. Bor.
Compl. S.

A. S. codde, a bag. Isl. kodde, a pillow.

Codware, s. A pillow-slip, S.

A. S. waer, retinaculum, Su. G. war, id. from waeri, to keep, to cover.

CODBAIT, s.
 1. The Lumbricus marinus, Loth.
 2. The straw-worm, ibid.

A. S. codd, folliculus.

CODE, s. A chrysom.
V. Cude.

To CODLE (corn), v. a. To make the grains fly out of the husks by a stroke, S. B. perhaps from cod, the pod.

CODROCH, adj.
 1. Rustic, having the manners of the country, Loth. Fife.
Ferguson.
 2. Dirty, slovenly, synon. hogry-mogry, Loth.

Ir. cudar, the rabble.

COELTS, s. pl. Colts.
Monroe.

To COFF, COFFE, v. a. To buy, to purchase, S., most commonly in the pret. coft.
V. Coup, v.
Shirrefs.

Germ. kaufte, bought, from kauf-en, Su. G. koep-a, to buy.

Coffe, Cofe, Coife, A merchant, a hawker; pedder coffe, a pedlar.
Bannatyne Poems.

COFFING, COFYNE, s.
 1. A shrine, a box.
Wyntown.
 2. The hard crust of bread.
Douglas.

Lat. cophin-us, a basket.

COFT, pret. and part. pa. Bought.
V. Coff.

COG, COAG, COIG, COGUE, s. A hollow wooden vessel of a circular form for holding milk, broth, &c. S.
Watson's Coll.

Germ. kauch, a hollow vessel, C. B. cawg, a bason.

To Cog, Cogue, v. a. To empty into a wooden vessel.
Ramsay.

COG, COGGE, s. A yawl or cockboat.
Wyntown.

Teut. kogghe, celox; Su. G. kogg, navigii genus, apud veteres.

To COGLE, COGGLE, v. a. To cause any thing to move from side to side, so as to seem ready to be overset, S.

Perhaps from cog, a yawl, because this is so easily overset.

Cogglie, adj. Moving from side to side, unsteady as to position, apt to be overset, S. Cockersum, synon.

COY, adj. Still, quiet.
Lyndsay.

Fr. coi, coy, id., from Lat. quiet-us.

COIDOCH, COYDYOCH, s. A term of contempt applied to a puny wight.
Polwart.

COIF, s. A cave.
Douglas.

COIG.
V. Cog, Coag.

COILHEUCH, s. A coalpit, S.
Skene.

COIN, COYNYE, s. A corner.
Barbour.

Fr. coin, id. Ir. cuinne, a corner, an angle.

COISSING, Cherrie and Slae.
V. Cose, v.

COIST, COST, s.
 1. The side in the human body.
Douglas.
Wallace.
 2. The trunk of the body.
Douglas.
 3. Also used for E. coast, Lat. ora, Doug.

Coist, s.
 1. Expence, cost.
Douglas.
 2. The provision made for watching the borders.
Acts Ja. II.

Belg.  Su. G. kost, cost, charge.

Coist, s.
 1. Duty payable in kind, Orkn.
 2. The sustenance given to a servant, as distinct from money, ibid.
Skene.

Su. G. Dan. kost, food.

To COIT, v. n. To butt, to justle.
Fordun.

Fr. cott-er, to butt, Isl. kuettr, torvus, kueita, violenter jactare.

COK. To cry cok, to acknowledge that one is vanquished.
Douglas.

O. Celt, coc, mediant, vile.

COKEWALD, s. A cuckold, Chauc.

Isl. qvonkall, curruca, seu cornutus, from kvon, uxor, and kvola, maculare, G. Andr.

COLEHOODING, s. The Black-cap, a bird, S. Coalhood.
Sibbald.

COLEMIE, COALMIE, s. The Coalfish, Asellus niger, Ang.

Germ. kohlmuhlen, id.

To COLF, v. a. To calk a ship.

Fr. calfat-er, Teut. kallefaet-en, id.

Colfin, Calfing, s. The wadding of a gun, S.
Wodrow.

COLIBRAND, s. A contemptuous designation for a blacksmith, Border.
Watson's Coll.

Su. G. kol, carbo, and brenna, urere, q. the coal-burner.

COLK, s. The Eider duck, a sea-fowl, S. the Duntur Goose of Sibbald.
Monroe.

COLL, s. A cock of hay, S. B. Keil. A. Bor.
Ross.

Fr. cueill-er, to gather, E. to coil.

To COLL, v. a.
 1. To cut, to clip. To coll the hair, to poll it, S.
 2. To cut any thing obliquely, S.
V. Cow.

Su. G. kull-a, verticis capillos abradere.

COLLATYOWN, s. Conference, discourse.

Lat. collatio.

Wyntown.

COLLEGENAR, s. A student at college, S.
Spalding.

COLLIE, COLLEY, s.
 1. The shepherd's dog, S.  A. Bor.
Burns.

Ir. cuilean, Gael. culie, a little dog.

 2. One who follows another constantly, S.
 3. A lounger, one who hunts for a dinner.
Calderwood.

To COLLIE, v. a. To abash, to silence in an argument; in allusion to a dog, who, when mastered or affronted, walks off with his tail between his feet, Fife.

COLLIESHANGIE, s.
 1. An uproar, a squabble, S.
Ross.
 2. A ring of plaited grass or straw, through which a lappet of a woman's gown, or fold of a man's coat is clandestinely thrust, in order to excite ridicule, Ang.

Perhaps from collie and shangie, q. v.

COLPINDACH, s. A young cow that has never calved.
Skene.

Gael. colbhtach, a cow calf.

COM, COME, s. Act of coming, arrival.
Barbour.

A. S. cum, cyme, adventus.

To COME, v. n.
 1. To sprout, to spring; applied to grain, when it begins to germinate, S.
 2. To sprout at the lower end; applied to grain in the process of malting, S.
Chalm. Air.

Isl. keim-a, Germ. kiem-en, id.

COMERWALD, adj. Hen-pecked.
Dunbar.

Comer, a gossip, and A. S. wald, power.

COMMEND, s. A comment, a commentary.
Douglas.

COMMEND, s. A benefice in commendam.
Douglas.

Fr. commende, L. B. commenda, id.

COMMON, COMMOUN. To be in one's common, to be obliged to one, S.
Pitscottie.
To quite a commoun, to requite.
Knox.

From commons as signifying fare.

COMMONTIE, s.
 1. A common, S.

Lat. communit-as.

 2. Community.
Acts Ja. VI.

COMPARGES, Leg. compaignyies, companies.
Houlate.

To COMPEIR, COMPEAR, v. n.
 1. To appear in the presence of another.
Bellenden.
 2. To present one's self in a court, civil or ecclesiastical, in consequence of being summoned, S.
Priests Peblis.

Fr. compar-oir, to appear, Lat. compar-ere, id.

Compearance, s. The act of presenting one's self in a court, S.
Baillie.

COMPER, s. The Common Fishing Crog, Lophius piscatorius, Linn. Orkn.
Barry.

To COMPESCE, v. a. To restrain.

Lat. compesco.

Baillie.

To COMPETE, v. n. To be in a state of competition, S.

COMPLENE, The last of the canonical hours.
Douglas.

L. B. complendae, officium ecclesiasticum, quod cetera diurna officia com-plet et claudit.

COMPLIMENT, s. A present, a gift, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

To Compliment with, v. a. To present one with, S.

To COMPONE, v. a. To settle.
R. Bruce.

To COMPONE, v. n. To compound.
Baillie.

CON, s. The squirrel; A. Bor. id.
Montgomerie.

CONABILL, adj. Attainable.
Barbour.

Lat. conabilis, what may be attempted.

CONAND, part. pr. Knowing, skilful.

From Cun, to know, q. v.

Wyntown.

To CONCEALE, v. a. To conciliate, Lat. concil-io.
More.

CONCEIT-NET, s. A fixed net, used in some rivers, S. B.

To CONDESCEND, v. a.
 1. To agree, to unite, S.
Complaynt S.

L. B. condescend-ere, consentire.

 2. To pitch upon, to enumerate particularly, S.

CONDET, CONDICT, CONDYT, s. Safe conduct.
Wallace.

CONDY, s. A conduit, S.

CONDICT, s. Conduit, passage.
Douglas.

Teut. konduyt, Fr. conduit, id.

CONFEERIN, part. adj. Consonant, S. B.
Ross.

Lat. conferr-e, to compare.

Confeirin, conj. Considering.
Journal Lond.

CONFIDER, adj. Confederate.
Douglas.

Fr. confeder-ez, id.

To CONFISKE, v. a. To confiscate.

Fr. confisqu-er, id.

Bellenden.

CONYNG, s. Knowledge, skill.
King's Quair.

To CONN, v. a. To know.
Barbour.

To CONNACH, v. a. To abuse, in whatever way. Aberd.
Pennecuik.

CONNAND, CONAND, s.
 1. Engagement, contract.
Barbour.
 2. Proffers, terms previous to an engagement.
Wallace.

Fr. convenant, from conven-ir, to agree.

CONNERED, part. pa. Curried.
Chalmerlan Air.

Fr. conroy-er, to curry.

CONNIE, CONNEIS, s. Perhaps provisions.
Chron. S. P.

O. Fr. convis, necessaries, Fr. convoi.

CONNYSHONIE, s. A gossiping conversation, S. B.

To CONNOCH, v. a.
V. Connach.

CONNOCH, s. A disease.
Polwart.

To CONQUACE, CONQUES, v. a.
 1. To acquire, whether by art or valour.
Douglas.
 2. To acquire by conquest.
Wallace.
 3. To purchase with money.
Reg. Maj.

Conquace, Conquese, s.
 1. Conquest.
Wallace.
 2. Acquisition by purchase.

L. B. conquestus, id.

Quon. Attach.

CONRYET, pret. Perhaps, disposed.
Wallace.

O. Fr. conraer, to prepare, whence conroi, order of battle.

CONSTABLE, s. A large glass, the contents of which he is obliged to drink, who has not drunk as much as the rest of the company, S.

CONSTERIE, CONSTRY, s. Consistory.
Forbes.

To CONSTITUTE, v. a. To open an ecclesiastical court with prayer, S.

CONTAKE, s. Contest.
Douglas.

CONTEMPTION, s. Contempt.
Bellenden.

To CONTEYNE, v. s. To continue.
Wallace.

To CONTENE, v. n. To demean one's self.
Barbour.

Contening, s.
 1. Demeanour.
Barbour.
 2. Military discipline.
Barbour.

CONTENEU, s. Tenor.
Complaynt S.

Fr. contenu, id.

CONTER. A conter, to the contrary.
Ross.

Fr. contre, against.

CONTERMYT, part. pa. Firmly set against.
Wallace.

Fr. contremet-tre, to oppose.

To CONTINUE, v. a. To delay.
Spotswood.

CONTRIMONT, adv. The contrary way.
Douglas.

Fr. contremont, directly against the stream.

CONTRAIR, adj. Contrary, Fr.
Baillie.

To Contrare, Conter, v. a. To thwart, to oppose, S.
Wyntown.

Fr. contrar-ier, id.

Contrare, s.
 1. Opposition of any kind.
Douglas.
 2. Something contrary to one's feelings or hopes. Conter, S. B.
Ross.

To CONTRUFE, v. a. To contrive; contruwit, part. pa.
Douglas.

Fr. controuv-er, id.

Contruwar, s. A contriver.

To CONVENE, CONVEANE, CONUEIN, v. n. To agree.
Forbes.

Fr. conven-ir, Lat. conven-ire, id.

Conuyne, Conuene, Conwyne, Covyne, Cowyne, Cuwyn, s.
 1. Paction, convention.

Fr. convent, id.
Douglas.

 2. Condition, state.
Barbour.
 3. Stratagem, conspiracy.
Wyntown.

O. Fr. convine, couvine, pratique, intrigue.

To CONVOY, v. a. To accomplish any purpose, especially by artful means.
Douglas.

Convoy, s.
 1. Mode of conveyance.
Baillie.
 2. A trick.
Poems 16th Cent.

Conwoy, s. Mein, carriage.
Dunbar.

COODIE, CUDIE, s. A small tub, also cude: quiddie, Aberd.
Ramsay.

Isl. kutte, tonnula, Gael. ciotad, a tub.

COOF, CUFE, s. A silly dastardly fellow, S.
Burns.

Su. G. kufw-a, to keep under, Isl. kueif, one who is cowardly and feeble.

To COOK, COUK, v. n.
 1. To appear and disappear by fits.
Burns.
 2. To hide one's self.
Kennedy.

Isl. kvik-a, moto, qvika, inquieta motatio.

COOKIE, s. A species of fine bread used at tea, of a round form, S.

Teut. koeck, libum.

COOLRIFE, adj.
 1. Cool, cold, S.
Ross.
 2. Indifferent, S.
V. Cauldrife.

COOM, s. The wooden frame used in building the arch of a bridge, S.
Statist. Acc.

Allied perhaps to Queme, q. v.

COOP, COUP-CART, s. A cart made close with boards, S.
Statist. Acc.

Teut. kuype, a large vessel for containing liquids.

COOT, s. The ancle.
V. Cute.

COOTH, s. A young coalfish.
V. Cuth.

COOTIE, adj. A term applied to fowls whose legs are clad with feathers, S.
Burns.

COP, COPE, s. A cup or drinking vessel.

A. S. cop, Isl. kopp, id.

Dunbar.

COPOUT. "To play copout," to drink off all that is in a cup or drinking vessel; cap-out, S.
Douglas.

COPE, s. A coffin; "a cope of leid," a leaden coffin.
V. Caip.
Knox.

To COPÉ betuene, to divide.
King Hart.

Fr. coup-er, to cut, to cleave.

COPER, s. A dealer.
V. Couper.

COPY, s. Plenty, abundance.
Wyntown.

Lat. copia.

COPPER, s. A cupbearer.
Palice of Hon.

Evidently from A. S. cop, a cup.

COPPIN, part. pa. Coppin in hevin, elevated to heaven.
King's Quair.

A. S. cop, the summit.

CORANICH, CORRENOTH, CORRINOCH, s.
 1. A dirge, a lamentation for the dead, S.
Lyndsay.

Ir. Gael. coranach, from cora, a quoir, Lat. chorus.

 2. A cry of alarm, a sort of war-cry.
Bannatyne Poems.
 3. A proclamation of outlawry by means of the bagpipe.
Warton.

CORBIE, CORBY, s. A raven; Corvus corax, Linn, S.
Henrysone.

Fr. corbeau, Ital. corvo, Lat. corv-us, id.

Corbie-Aits, s. pl. A species of black oats, denominated perhaps from their dark colour, S. B.

Corbie Messenger, A messenger who either returns not at all, or too late, S.
Houlate.

CORBIE-STEPS, s. pl. The projections of the stones, or the slanting part of a gable, resembling steps of stairs, S.

Fr. corbeau, a corbeil in masonry.

CORBIT, adj. Apparently, crooked.
Maitland.

Fr. courbé, id. courbette, a small crooked rafter.

CORBUYLE, s. Leather greatly thickened and hardened in the preparation, jacked leather.
Douglas.

Fr. cuir bouilli, corium coctum.

CORCHAT, s. Crotchet, a term in music.
Dunbar.

CORCOLET, s. A purple dye, Shetl.

CORDYT, pret. v. Agreed.
Wallace.

Fr. accordée.

CORDON, s. A band, a wreath.

Fr. id.
Z. Boyd.

CORDOWAN, s. Spanish leather, Gl. Sibb. Tanned horse leather, S.

CORDS, s. pl. A contraction of the muscles of the neck; a disease of horses, A. Bor.
Polwart.

CORE, s. A company, a body of men, often used for corps.
Hamilton.

CORF, s. A basket used for carrying coals from the pit, Loth.

Belg. korf, Isl. koerf, Lat. corb-is, id.

CORF, s. A temporary building, a shed.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. cruft, a vault, Teut. krofte, a cave.

Corf-House, s. A house, shed, erected for the purpose of curing salmon, and for keeping the nets in, S. B.
Courant.

CORFT, part. pa. Corft fish are fish boiled with salt and water, S. B.

CORKY, adj. Airy, brisk.
Sir J. Sinclair.

CORMUNDUM. To cry Cormundum, to confess a fault.
Kennedy.

In allusion to one of the Penitential Psalms.

CORNCRAIK, s. The Crake or land rail, Rallus crex, Linn.
V. Craik.
Houlate.

Probably denominated from its cry.

CORNE PIPE, s. A reed or whistle with a horn fixed to it by the smaller end.

CORNYKLE, s. A chronicle.
Wallace.

CORP, s. A corpse, a dead body.

Corps-Present, s. A funeral gift to the church, for supplying any deficiency on the part of the deceased.
Knox.

Fr. corps and present-er, q. to present the body for interment; or Fr. present, a gift.

CORRACH, CORRACK, s. A pannier, Ang.

Su. G. korg, a pannier or basket.

CORRIE, s. A hollow between hills, or rather in a hill, Gael. also corehead, S.
Statist. Acc.

CORS, CORSE, s. Market place, S.; from the cross being formerly erected there.

Sw. kors, id.

CORS, CORSS, s. An animated body.

Fr. corps.

Douglas.

CORSBOLLIS, pl. Crossbows.
Complaynt S.

CORSES, s. pl. Money, from its bearing the firm of the cross.
Dunbar.

CORSSY, adj. Bigbodied, corpulent.
Douglas.

CORSYBELLY, s. A shirt for a child, open before, S. B.
Ross.

Q. A shirt that is folded across the belly.

CORTER, s.
 1. A quarter, corr. from quarter, Aberd.
 2. A cake, because quartered, ibid.
Journal Lond.

CORUIE, s. A crooked iron for pulling down buildings.
Hudson.

Fr. corbeau, "a certaine warlike instrument;" Cotgr.

CORUYN, s. A kind of leather.
Douglas.

Corr. from Cordowan, q. v.

COSCH, COSHE, s. A coach.
Bruce.

Fr. coche.

To COSE, COSS, COISS, v. a. To exchange; coss, Loth.
Wallace.

Cossing, s. The act of exchanging.
Skene.

COSH, adj.
 1. Neat, snug; as denoting a comfortable situation, S.
Ferguson.
 2. Quiet, without interruption, S.
Minstrelsy Border.
 3. In a state of intimacy, S.

Isl. kios, a small place well fenced.

Coshly, adv. Snugly, S.
Ferguson.

COSIE, COZIE, adj. Warm, comfortable, snug, well-sheltered, S.
Burns.

This seems radically the same with Cosh.

Cosiely, adv. Snugly, comfortably, S.
Ramsay.

COSINGNACE, s.
 1. A relation by blood, a cousin.
Bellenden.
 2. A grand-daughter; or a niece.
Bellenden.

To COSS, v. a. To exchange.
V. Cose.

COST, s. Side.
V. Coist.

COSTAGE, s. Expence.
Douglas.

To COSTAY, v. n. To coast.
Wyntown.

COSSNENT, s. To work at cossnent, to receive wages without victuals, S.
To work black cossnent, to work without meat or wages, Ayr.

Fr. caust aneanti, cost abrogated, q. expences not borne.

To COT with one, v. n. To cohabit, S. B. q. to live in the same cot.

COTTAR, COTTER, s. One who inhabits a cot or cottage. S.
Statist. Acc.

L. B. cottar-ius, Fr. cottier, id.  Hence S. cotterman, cotterfouk, &c.

COVAN, s. A convent.
Dunbar.
Anciently written covent.
Sir Gawan.

In S., caivin is still used for convent.

COUDIE, adj.
V. Couth.

COUATYSE, COVETISE, COWATYSS, s.
 1. Covetousness.
Douglas.

O. Fr. couvoitise, id.

 2. Ambition, or the lust of power.
Barbour.

COUBROUN, adj. Uncertain, both as to signification and etymon.
Lyndsay.

COUCHER, s. A coward.
Rutherford.
Coucher Blow, the last stroke, S.

From the E. v. couch, Fr. couch-er.

COVE, s. A cave, S. A. Bor.
Bellenden.

A. S. cofe, Isl. kofe, id.

COUGHT, for couth. Could.
S. P. Rep.

COUHIRT, s. Cow-herd.
Dunbar.

To COUK.
V. Cook.

To COUK, v. n. A term used to denote the sound emitted by the cuckoo.
Montgomerie.

COULIE, COWLIE, s.
 1. A boy, S.

Su. G. kullt, id.

 2. A term applied to a man in the language of contempt, S.
Cleland.

COULPE, s. A fault.
Complaynt S.

Fr. coulpe, Lat. culp-a.

COULPIT, part. pa. Apparently, bartered, for coupit.
Maitland Poems.

To COUNGEIR, v. a. To conjure.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Coungerar, s. A conjurer.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

COUNYIE, s. Perhaps, motion.
Dunbar.

Fr. coign-er, to beat, to strike.

COUNT, s. An accompt; counting, arithmetic, S.

To COUNTERFACTE, v. n. To counterfeit.
Acts Ja. VI.

COUNTYR, COWNTIR, s.
 1. Encountre.
Douglas.
 2. A division of an army engaged in battle.
Wallace.

To COUP, COWP, v. a. To exchange, to barter, S.  A. Bor.

Su. G. koep-a, id.

Coup, s.
 1. Exchange, S.
Maitland P.
 2. The hail coup, the whole of any thing, S.

Couper, Coper, s.
 1. A dealer; as, horse-couper, cow-couper.
Chalm. Air.
 2. One who makes merchandise of souls.
Rutherford.

To COUP, COWP, v. a. To overturn, to overset, S.
Knox.

To Coup, v. n. To overset, to tumble, S.
Muses Threnodie.

Sw. gupp-a, to tilt up.

Coup, Cowp, s.
 1. A fall, S. couppis, S. B.
Lyndsay.
 2. A sudden break in the stratum of coals, S.
Statist. Acc.

COUPLE, CUPPIL, s. A rafter, S.

C. B. kupul-ty, id.

Wyntown.

To COUR, v. n. To stoop, to crouch, S., cower, E.

To COUR, v. n. To recover.
V. Cower.

COURCHE, s. A covering for a woman's head. S. Curchey, Dunbar.
Wallace.

Fr. couvre-chef.

COURERS, CURERS, s. pl. Covers.
Gl. Sibb.

COUT, COWT, s. A young horse, S. corr. from colt.

Cout-evil, s. A disease incident to young horses, Border.; E. strangles.
Polwart.

COUTCHACK, s. The clearest part of a fire, S. B.
Journal Lond.

COUTCHIT, part. pa. Inlaid, stuffed.

Fr. couch-er, to lay.

Douglas.

COUTH, aux. v. Could.
Barbour.

A. S. cuthe, novi, from cunn-an, noscere.

COUTH, part. pa. Known.
Douglas.

COUTH, s. Enunciated sound; a word.
Popular Ball.

Isl. qwaede, syllaba, qwed-a, effari.

COUTH, COUTHY, COUDY, adj.
 1. Affable, facetious, familiar, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Loving, affectionate, S.
Burns.
 3. Comfortable.
Popular Ball.
 4. Pleasant to the ear, S. B.
Ross.
 5. Ominous of evil; no coudy, Ang.

A. S. cuth, familiaris; Teut. koddig, facetus.

Couthily, adv. Kindly, familiarly, S.
Ross.

Couthiness, Coudiness, s. Facetiousness, kindness, S.

COUTTERTHIRL, s. The vacuity between the coulter and the ploughshare, S.
V. Thirl.

To COW, v. a.
 1. To poll the head, S.
Bellenden.
 2. To clip short, in general.
Polwart.
 3. To cut, to prune, to lop off.
V. Coll, v.
To cow out, to cut out.
 4. To eat up as food, S.
Popul. Ball.
 5. To be cowit, to be bald.
Dunbar.
 6. It occurs as signifying shaven; applied to the Roman tonsure.
Cleland.

Isl. koll-r, tonsum caput.

 7. Often used metaph. S. like E. snib.
Ramsay.

Cow, Kow, s.
 1. A twig of any shrub or plant, S.
Priests Pebl.
 2. Used to denote a bush.
Minst. Bord.
 3. A besom made of broom, S.
Warton.
 4. An instrument of correction, like E. birch, S.
 5. The fuel used for a temporary fire, S.
Ross.
 6. The act of pruning, viewed metaph. S.
Burns.

COW, KOW, s.
 1. A scarecrow, S.
Hamilton.
 2. A hobgoblin, S.
Philotus.
To play kow, to act the part of a goblin.
Roull.

From E. cow, to intimidate; or Isl. kug, suppressio.

Cow. Brown cow, a ludicrous designation given by the vulgar to a barrel of beer or ale, from its colour, as contra-distinguished from that of milk, S.
Ramsay.

COWAN, s. A fishing boat.
Wodrow.

Su. G. kogge, C. B. cwch, linter.

COWAN, s.
 1. One who does the work of a mason, but has not been regularly bred, S.
 2. One who builds dry walls, S.
Statist. Acc.

Su. G. kujon, homo imbellis; Fr. coi-on, a base fellow; from Su. G. kufw-a, supprimere, insultare.

COWART, s. Covert.
Wallace.

COWARTRY, s. Cowardice.
Bellenden.

COWATYSS.
V. Couatyse.

COW-CLOOS, s. pl. Common trefoil, S. B. Trifolium pratense, Linn.

COWCLYNK, s. A harlot.
Lyndsay.

Perhaps from cow, and clink, money; q. one who prunes the purse.

To COWER, COWYR, COUR, v. a. To recover.
Barbour.

Abbrev. from Fr. recouvrir.

Cowering, s. Recovery.
Barbour.

COW-FISH, s. The Mactra lutraria, Mya arenaria, or any other large oval shellfish, Orkney.

COWFYNE, s. A ludicrous term.
Evergreen.

COWHUBBY, s. A cow-herd.
Evergreen.

Belg. koe, a cow, and hobb-en, to toil, q. a cow-herd.

COWIE, s. The name given to the Porpoise in the Firth of Tay.

COWIE, s. A cow wanting horns, S.
V. Cow, v.

COWIE, adv. Very; as cowie weel, very well, Lanerks.

Cowie, adj. Odd, queer, Lanerks.

COWIT, part. pa.
 1. Closely cut.
 2. Having short and thin hair.
V. Cow, v.

To COWK, v. n. To reach ineffectually; in consequence of nausea, S. B.

Germ. koch-en, id.; Isl. kuok-a, gula niti.

COWKIN, s. A beggar, a needy wretch.

Fr. coquin, id.

Dunbar.

COWLICK, s. A tuft of hair on the head, which cannot be made to lie in the same direction with the rest of the hair, S.

From its resemblance to hair licked by a cow.

COWMACK, s. An herb supposed to have great virtue in making the cow desire the male, S. B.

COWMAN, s. A name for the devil, S.
V. Cow, s.

COWNTIR, s. Rencountre.
Wallace.

COWNTYR PALYSS, Contrary to.
Wallace.

Fr. contrepalé, a term in heraldry, signifying that one pale is opposed to another.

COWOID, pret. Convoyed. Leg. conwoid.
Barbour.

COWPES, COWPIS, s. pl. Baskets for catching fish, S.
Acts Ja. III.

A. Bor. coop, id. Teut. kuype, septa.

COWPON, s. A fragment, a shred, S.
R. Bruce.

Fr. coupon, L. B. copo, a piece cut off from a thing.

COWPER JUSTICE, Trying a man after execution; the same with Jeddart, or Jedburgh justice, S.
Cleland.

COW-QUAKE, s. An affection of cattle, caused by the chillness of the weather, S.
Kelly.

COWSCHOT, s. A ringdove.
V. Kowshot.

COXY, adj. Coxcomical, S.
Ramsay.

To CRAB, CRABE, v. n. To fret.
Bannatyne Poems.

Belg. kribbig, Su. G. krepsk, morosus.

To CRAB, v. a. To provoke.
Lyndsay.

Teut. krabb-en, lacerare unguibus.

To CRACK, CRAK, v. n.
 1. To talk boastingly.
Evergreen.
 2. To talk freely and familiarly, S.
Ramsay.
 3. To talk together in a confused manner; often as also implying extension of voice, S.

Germ. kraken, to make a noise.

Crack, Crak, s.
 1. Boasting, S.
Dunbar.
 2. Chat, free conversation, S.
Ross.
 3. Any detached piece of entertaining conversation, S.
Ross.
 4. A rumour; generally used in pl.
Ramsay.

Cracker, Crakkar, s. A boaster.

Belg. kraecker, id.

Lyndsay.

Cracky, adj.
 1. Talkative; often denoting the effect of one's being elevated by means of strong drink, S.
 2. Affable, agreeable in conversation, S.

CRACK, s. In a crack, immediately, S.
Ramsay.

To CRACK, v. a.
 1. To crack credit, to lose character and confidence in any respect, S.
Z. Boyd.
 2. To crack tryst, to break an engagement.

CRACKERHEADS, s. pl. The roots of big tangles, or alga marina, eaten by young people, Ang.

CRACKLINGS, s. pl.
 1. The refuse of tallow, S.
Acts Ja. VI.
 2. Tallow, when first bruised by the candlemaker, in its impure state, S.

Su. G. krak, quisquiliae.

CRAFT, s. Croft, a piece of ground, adjoining to a house.

A. S. croft, id.

CRAG, CRAGE, CRAIG, s.
 1. The neck, S.
Complaynt S.
 2. The throat, S.
Ferguson.

Teut. kraeghe, jugulus.

Craiged, adj. Having a neck or throat, S.
Ramsay.

Craigagee, adj. Wrynecked, S.
V. Agee.

Cragbane, s. The collar-bone.
Wallace.

Crage Claith, s. A neckcloth, a cravat, S.

Sw. krageclud, id.

CRAIG, s. A rock, S.
Ramsay.

C. B. kraig, Gael. creog, rupes.

Craig-Flook, s. A species of flounder.
Sibbald.

Craig-Herring, s. The Shad.
Sibbald.

Craiglugge, s. The point of a rock, S.
Brand.

Craigy, adj. Rocky.
Ramsay.

CRAYAR, CREAR, s. A kind of lighter.
Acts Marie.

L. B. craiera, id. Sw. krejare, a small vessel with one mast.

To CRAIK, v. n.
 1. Used to denote the cry of a hen after laying; or when dissatisfied, S.
Polwart.
 2. To call for any thing, with importunity and impatience, S.

Teut. kraeck-en, crepare, strepere.

Crakyng, s. The clamour of a fowl, S.
Wyntown.

CRAIK, s. A kind of little ship.
Douglas.

CRAIL-CAPON, s. A haddock dried, but not split, Loth., denominated from Caraill, a town in Fife.

CRAIT, CREET, s. A sort of basket in which window-glass is packed, S.

Germ. kraet, corbis.

To CRAK.
V. Crack.

CRAKER, s. The Raill, Rallus crex, Linn.
Martin.

CRAKYS, s. pl. Great guns.
Barbour.

From the noise they make when fired; or, Teut. kraecke, arcubalista.

CRAKLENE POKIS, Bags for holding artificial fireworks.
Complaynt S.

Fr. craquer, to crackle.

CRAME, CRAMERY.
V. Cream, Creamery.

CRAMESYE, CRAMMESY, s. Cloth of crimson, a grain-colour.
Douglas.

Fr. cramoisi, id.

To CRAMP, v. n. To contract.
Henrysone.

Teut. kromp-en, Sw. krymp-a, con-trahi.

CRAMPET, CRAMP-BIT, s.
 1. A cramping-iron, S.
 2. An iron with small pikes for keeping the foot firm on ice, S.
Graeme.
 3. The guard of the handle of a sword.
Watson's Coll.

CRAMPLAND, part. pr. Curling.
Bannatyne Poems.

Sw. krympling, contractus.

CRAN, s. An iron instrument, laid across the fire for supporting a pot or kettle.

Denominated from its resemblance to a crane.

CRANCE, s. A chaplet.
Watson's Coll.

Teut. krants, corona.

CRANE (of herrings), s. As many fresh herrings as fill a barrel, S.
Statist. Acc.

CRANGLING, part. pr. Winding.
Hudson.

Teut. kronckel-en, intorquere, sinuare.

CRANK, adj. Infirm, weak.

Teut. krank, id. Gl. Sibb.

CRANK, s.
 1. The noise of an ungreased wheel, S.
 2. Used metaph. to denote inharmonious poetry.
Burns.

Crankous, adj. Fretful, captious, S.
Burns.

Gael. crioncan, strife.

CRANNACH, s. Pottage, Ang. Aberd.

CRANREUCH, s. Hoar frost, S. O.

Gael. cranntarach, id.

Burns.

CRANSHACH, CRANSHAK, s. A distorted person, S. B.
Ross.

Gael. crannda, decrepid.

CRANTZE, s. The Common Coralline, Millepora polymorpha, Linn., Shetl.

CRAP, s.
 1. The highest part or top of any thing, S.; crop, E.
Baith crap and root, literally, top and bottom; metaph., beginning and end, S.
 2. The cone of a fir-tree, S. B.

A. S. croppa, Su. G. kroppa, id.

CRAP, s. The produce of the ground, S.
Ramsay.

CRAP, s. The craw of a fowl, crop, E.; used ludicrously for the stomach of man; crapine, id. S.
Ramsay.

Teut. krop, ingluvies; stomachus.

To Crap, v. a. To fill, to stuff, S.
Crappit heads, the heads of haddocks stuffed with a pudding made of the roe, oatmeal and spiceries, S.

Teut. kropp-en, saginare, turundis farcire.

To CRAP, v. a. To crop, to lop, S.
Ferguson.

Teut. krapp-en, abscindere.

CRAPS, s. pl. A species of weed, S. named perhaps from keeping near the crap or surface of the ground.

CRAUCH. To cry crauch, to acknowledge one's self vanquished.
Dunbar.

Arm. cracq, a bastard.

CRAUCHMET, (gutt.) s. An exaction made by men in a state of war.
MS. Chron.

To CRAW, v. n.
 1. To crow; crawin, part. pa.
Douglas.
 2. To boast, to vapour, S.
Ferguson.

A. S. craw-an, id.

CRAW, s. A crow, S.

Craw, s. The act of crowing, S.
Burns.

A. S. crawe, Alem. craue, id.

Craw-Croops, s. pl. Crow-berries, S. B.

Craw-Dulse, s. Fringed fucus; S. Fucus ciliatus, Linn.

Craw-Taes, s. pl. Crowfoot, S. Ranunculus, repens and acris.

CRAWDOUN, s. A coward.
Douglas.

Fr. creant and donn-er, to do homage.

To CREAM, v. a. To hawk goods, S. B.

Cream, Craim, Crame, s.
 1. A merchant's booth, S.
Acts Sed.

Teut. kraem, taberna rerum venalium.

 2. A pack of goods for sale.
Skene.

Teut. kraem, Dan. kram, merchandise.

Creamer, s. A pedlar, S. B.
Skene.

Su. G. kraemare, Teut. kraemer, id.

Creamerie, Cramery, s. Merchandise, goods sold by a pedlar, Aberd.
Lyndsay.

Teut. kraemerije, merx.

Cream-Ware, Creme-Ware, s. Articles sold by those who keep booths.
Brand.

CREEK of day, The first appearance of the dawn, S.; skreek, S. B.
Ramsay.

Teut. kriecke, aurora rutilans.

CREEPERS.
V. Creparis.

To CREEP IN, v. n. To shrink. Cruppen in, shrivelled, S.

Isl. kropna, contrahi.

CREEPY, CREEPIE, s.
 1. A low stool, occasionally used in a pulpit for elevating the speaker, S.
 2. The stool of repentance, on which culprits formerly sat when making public satisfaction in the church, S.
Ramsay.

CREESE, CREEZE, s. Crisis.
Ross.

CREIL, CREEL, s.
 1. An ozier basket, S.; scull, synon.
Bannatyne P.
 2. Panniers are also called creils.
Dunbar.
In a creel, in a state of mental stupefaction or confusion, S.

Ir. crilin, id. Gael. criol, a chest.

To Creil, v. a. To put into a basket, S.

Creeling, s. A foolish and indelicate custom, on the day after marriage, still retained among the vulgar in some places, S.

To CREIS, v. n. To curl.
Douglas.

Teut. kroes-en, Germ. kraus-en, crispare.

To CREISCH, v. a.
 1. To grease, S.
Kelly.
 2. Metaph. applied to the use of money, S.
Ferguson.
 3. To criesh one's lufe, to give money as a veil, or as a bribe, S.
Journal Lond.

Creische, Creesh, s. Grease, S.
Dunbar.

Fr. graisse, id.

 2. A stroke, a blow, S.
Ferguson.

Creischie, Creishy, adj. Greasy, S.
Lyndsay.

CREYST, s. One who is both diminutive and loquacious, Border.

Teut. kroes-en, to contract.

CREPARIS, s. pl. Grapnels of iron, S. creepers.
Bellenden.

CREVISH, s. A crayfish.
Baillie.

CREWIS, pres. v. Perhaps, craves.

A. S. craf-ian, id.

Houlate.

To CRY, v. a. To proclaim the bans of marriage, S.

To Cry, v. n. To be in labour, S.

Crying, s. Childbirth, S.
Galloway.

CRYKES, pl. s. Angles.
Barbour.

A. S. crecca, a creek.

To CRIMP, v. a. To plait nicely, S.

Sw. krymp-a, to shrink.

To CRINCH, v. a.
 1. To grind with the teeth.
 2. To crinch the teeth, to gnash.

Fr. grinc-er les dents, id.

CRINCH, s. A very small bit of any thing, S.

To CRINE, CRYNE, v. n.
 1. To shrivel, S.
Evergreen.
 2. To diminish money by clipping it.

Ir. krion-am, to wither.

Douglas.

CRINKIE-WINKIE, s. A contention, S. B.

Su. G. kraenka, to be vexed.

CRISP, CRISPE, s.
 1. Cobweb lawn.

Fr. crespe, id.

Burel.

CRISTIE, CRISTY, adj. Perhaps curled. Dan. kruset, id.
Acts Ja. II.

CRO, CROY, s. The satisfaction made for the slaughter of any man, according to his rank.
Reg. Maj.

Gael. cro, cows, the reparation being made in cattle; or Ir. crÃ, death.

To CROAGH, (gutt.) v. a. To strangle, Fife.

CROCE, CROYS, s. One of the sails in a ship.
Douglas.

Sw. kryss-top, the mizzen-top.

CROCHE, CROCHERT.
V. Hagbut.

CROCHIT, part. pa. "Covered."
Gawan and Gol.

CROCKONITION, s. Any thing bruised to pieces.
Buchan.

CROFT-LAND, s. Land of superior quality, which was still cropped, S.
Statist. Acc.

CROIL, CROYL, s. A distorted person, a dwarf.

Teut. kriel, pumilus.

Polwart.

To CROYN, CRONE, CRUNE, v. n.
 1. To cry as a bull does, in a low and hollow tone, S.
Maitland Poems.

Belg. kreun-en, to whimper; Isl. hryn-a, grunnire.

 2. To whine, to persist in moaning, S.
 3. To hum, or sing in a low tone, S.
Burns.

CROYN, CRUNE, CROON, s.
 1. A hollow continued moan, S.
Douglas.
 2. An incantation.
Ramsay.

To CROISE, v. n. To gossip, to talk a great deal about little, S. B.

Su. G. krusa, ficta in verbis civilitate uti.

Crozie, adj. Fawning, wheedling, Buchan.

CROISHTARICH, s. The fire-cross, or signal of war; a stake of wood, the one end dipped in blood, and the other burnt, (as an emblem of fire and sword,) which was conveyed with the greatest expedition, till it went through the whole tribe or country.

Gael. croistara, perhaps from crois, a cross, and tara, a multitude.

CROK, s. A dwarf, Ang.

Su. G. kraek, animal quodvis exiguum, Isl. kracke, kroge, tener puellus vel pullus.

CROK, s. An old ewe that has given over bearing, S.
Dunbar.

To CROK, v. n. To suffer decay from age, Gl. Sibb.

CRONACHIN, part. pr. Gossiping in a tattling way, S. B.

Perhaps from Coranich, q. v.

CRONDE, s. Leg. croude, a fiddle.
Houlate.

To CRONE, v. n. To use many words in a wheedling way, Buchan.

CRONY, s. A potatoe, Dumfr.

To CROOK, v. n. To halt in walking, S.

Sw. krok-ia, id.

Ramsay.

Crook, s. A halt, S.
Rutherford.

CROOKSADDLE, s. A saddle for supporting panniers, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

CROONER, CROWNER, s. The Trigla lyra, a fish, S.; denominated from the cruning noise it makes after being taken.
Barry.

To CROP the causey, to appear openly and boldly; q. to keep the crown of the causey.
Spalding.

CROOT, s.
 1. A puny, feeble child, Loth.
 2. The youngest and feeblest of a nest, or of a litter, South of S. synon. wrig.

Arm. crot, petit enfant.

CROTE, s. The smallest particle.

Sw. krut, powder.

Wyntown.

CROUCHIE, s. One that is hunchbacked, S.
Burns.

Su. G. krok, incurvus.

To CROUD, CROWDE, v. n.
 1. To coo as a dove.
Douglas.
 2. To croak, S.
Ruddiman.
 3. Metaph. to groan, to complain.
Z. Boyd.

C. B. gridhuan, gemere; Belg. kryt-en, to cry.

CROUDE, s. A musical instrument formerly used in S.

CROVE, s. A cottage.
V. Crufe.

To CROUP, CRUPE, CROWP, v. n.
 1. To croak, to cry with a hoarse voice.
Complaynt S.
 2. To speak hoarsely, as the effect of a cold, S.

Moes. G. hrop-jan, Isl. hrop-a, clamare.

Crowping, s. A hoarse sound.
Douglas.

Croup, s. A disease affecting the throat of a child, S. Cynanche trachealis, synon. chock, stuffing, closing.
Buchan.

From the noise made in breathing.

CROUP, s. A berry, Gl. Sibb.
V. Craw-croops.

A. S. crop, uva.

CROUS, CROUSE, adj. Brisk; apparently, brave, S.
Peblis to the Play.

Fr. courroucé, chafed; or Su. G. krus, curled.

Crouseness, s. Appearance of courage, S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Crousely, adv. With confidence, or some degree of petulance, S.
Ramsay.

To CROUT, v. n.
 1. To make a croaking or murmuring noise, S.
Popular Ball.
 2. To coo, S.
V. Croud.
Complaynt S.

CROWDIE, s.
 1. Meal and water in a cold state, stirred together, so as to form a thick gruel, S.
Ritson.
 2. Food of the porridge kind in general.
Ramsay.

Su. G. grot, Isl. graut-ur, pulse made of meal and water.

Crowdie-time, s. Time of taking breakfast, S.

To CROWL, v. n. To crawl, S.
Burns.

Belg. kriol-en, id.

CROWNELL, s. A coronet.
Douglas.

L. B. coronula, parva corona.

CROWNER, CROWNARE, CROUNAL, s.
 1. An officer, to whom it belonged to attach all persons, against whom there was an accusation in matters pertaining to the crown. E. coroner.
Wyntown.
 2. The commander of the troops raised in one county.
Baillie.

Crownarship, s. The office of a crowner.
Robertson.

CROWNER, s. The name of a fish.
V. Crooner.

CROW-PURSE, s. The ovarium of a skate, Orkn.

CRUBAN, s. A disease of cows, S. B.
Ess. Highl. Soc.

CRUBAN, s. A wooden pannier fixed on a horse's back, Caithn.
Statist. Acc.

CRUDS, s. pl. Curds, S.
Shirrefs.

Cruddy Butter, A kind of cheese, of which the curds, being poor, are mixed with butter, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

CRUE-HERRING, s. The Shad, Tupea Alosa, Linn.
Pennant.

CRUELL, adj.
 1. Keen in battle.
Wallace.
 2. Resolute, undaunted.
Wallace.
 3. Terrible.
Wallace.
 4. Acute. "Cruel pain," acute pain, S.

CRUELS, s. The king's evil, scrophula, S.

Fr. ecrouelles, id.

Wodrow.

CRUER, s. A kind of ship; apparently the same with Crayar, q. v.
Mellvill's MS.

CRUFE, CRUIFE, CROVE, s.
 1. A hovel, S. cru, S. B.
Henrysone.
 2. A stye.
Skene.

Isl. hroo, hroof, structura vilis.

CRUISKEN of whisky, a certain measure of this liquor, Ang.

Dan. kruus, a cup.

CRUKE, s. A circle.
Douglas.

Teut. krok-en, curvare.

CRUKIS, CROOKS, s. pl. The windings of a river, S.
Wallace.

Isl. krok-r, angulus.

To CRULGE, v. a. To contract, to draw together, S.
Shirrefs.

Teut. krull-en, intorquere, sinuare.

Crulge, s. A confused coalition, or conjunction, S.

Isl. krull, confusio.

CRUMMIE, CRUMMOCK, s. A name for a cow that has crooked horns, S.
Ramsay.

Isl. krumme, Gael. crom, crooked.

Crummock, Crummie-stick, s. A staff with a crooked head, S.
Burns.

CRUMMOCK, s. Skirret, a plant, S.

Gael. crumag, id.

Brand.

To CRUMP, v. a. To make a crashing noise in eating what is hard and brittle, S.
Morison.

Crump, Crumpie, adj. Crisp, brittle, S.
Burns.

To CRUNE.
V. Croyn.

To CRUNKLE, v. a.
 1. To cress, to rumple, S.
 2. To shrivel, to contract, S.

Teut. kronckel-en, to wrinkle.

Crunkle, s. A cress, a wrinkle, S.

CRUNT, s. A blow on the head with a cudgel, S.
Burns.

CRUVE, CRUIVE, s. A box resembling a hen-crib, placed in a dam or dike that runs across a river, for confining the fish that enter into it, S.

Su. G. krubba, praesepe.

Acts Ja. I.

CRUTLACHIN, part. pr. Conversing in a silly tattling way, S. B.

CUCHIL, CUTHIL, s. A forest or grove.
Douglas.

C. B. coedawl, belonging to a forest.

CUCK-STULE, CUKSTULE.
V. Cock-stule.

CUD, s. A strong staff, S.

Teut. kodde, a club.

To Cud, v. a. To cudgel, S.

Cuddy-rung, s. A cudgel.
Dunbar.

CUDBEAR, s. The Lichen omphalodes, dark purple dyer's lichen, S.
Statist. Acc.

CUDDIE, s. An ass, often cuddie-ass, S.

CUDDIE, CUTH, s. The cole-fish.
Statist. Acc.

CUDDING, s. The char, a fish, Ayrs.
Statist. Acc.

To CUDDLE, CUDLE, v. n. To embrace, S.
Ramsay.

Teut. kudd-en, coire, convenire.

CUDDLIE, s. A secret muttering among a number of people, S. B.

Teut. quedel-en, garrire.

To CUDDUM, CUDDEM, v. a.
 1. "To cuddum a beast," to make it tame and tractable, S. B.
 2. To bring into domestic habits; applied to persons, S.
Ross.

Fr. accoutum-er, to accustom.

Cuddum, adj. Tame, usually applied to a beast, S. B.

CUDE, CUDIE, s. (pron. as Gr. υ.). A small tub, Ang.
V. Coodie.

CUDE, CODE, s. A chrysom, or facecloth for a child at baptism.
Spotswood.

From C. B. cudd-io, to cover.

CUDE, CUID, adj. Harebrained, appearing as one deranged, Border.; synon. skeer.

Isl. kuid-a, to fear.

CUDEIGH, s. A bribe; a premium for the use of money, Loth.; a gift conferred clandestinely, S.
Ramsay.

Gael. cuidaigh-am, to help.

CUFE, s. A simpleton, S.
V. Coof.

CUFF of the neck, the fleshy part of the neck behind, S.

Isl. kuf-r, convexitas.

To CUINYIE, v. a. To strike money.
Acts Ja. II.

Fr. coign-er, id. L. B. cun-ire, id.

Cuinyie, s.
 1. Coin, S. B.
Acts Ja. IV.
 2. The mint.
Acts Ja. IV.

Cuinyie-House, s. The mint.
Skene.

Cuinyioure, s. The master of the mint.

CUIRIE, s. Stable, mews.
V. Quirie.

Fr. escurie, id.

Pitscottie.

CUISSER, CUSSER, s. A stallion, S.
V. Cursour.
Ferguson.

CUIST, s. A reproachful term.
Polwart.

CUITCHOURIS, s. pl. Gamblers; also smugglers.
Gl. Sibb.

CULDEES, s. pl. A body of teaching presbyters, who, from the sixth century downwards, had their establishments in Ireland, the Hebrides, Scotland, and Wales; were greatly celebrated for their piety; and, acknowledging no bishop, were subject to an abbot chosen by themselves.
D. Buchanan.

Gael. cuildeach, a sequestered person, from cuil, a retired corner, a cave, a cell.

To CULYE, CULYIE, v. a.
 1. To coax, to cajole, S.
Douglas.
 2. To soothe.
Douglas.
 3. To cherish, to fondle.
Douglas.
 4. To gain, to draw forth.
Kelly.
 5. To train to the chace.
Douglas.
 6. To culye in with one, to curry favour, S.

Su. G. kel-a, to fondle; kela med en, to make much of one.

Culyeon, s. A poltroon, E. cullion.
Hamilton.

Cullionry, s. The conduct of a poltroon.
Baillie.

CULLAGE, s. The characteristic marks of sex.

Fr. couille, testes, &c. whence couillage, culaige, tributum a subditis matrimonio jungendis, domino exsolvendum.

CULLOCK, s. A species of shell-fish, Shetl.
Neill.

CULMES, CULMEZ, s. A rural club.
Douglas.

CULPIT, part. pa. Leg. cuplit, coupled.
Lyndsay.

CULREACH, s. A surety given to a court, when one is repledged from it.
V. Repledge.
Quon. Attach.

Gael. cul, custody, and reachd, a law.

CULROUN, s. A rascal, a silly fellow.
Douglas.

Belg. kul, testiculus, and ruyn-en, castrare.

To CUM to, v. n.
 1. To recover, S.
Knox.
 2. To make advancement in art, S.
 3. To rise to honour, S.
Presb. Eloq.

Cumd, part. pa. Come, Loth.

Burel.

CUMERLACH, CUMBERLACH, s. A servant attached to a religious foundation.
Cumerb, id.
Chart. MS.

Gael. comhairleach, an adviser; com-harba, a partner in church lands, a vicar, pron. coarb.

CUMLIN, s. Any animal that attaches itself to a person or place of its own accord, S.

E. comeling, one newly come.

CUMMAR, s. Vexation, entanglement, E. cumber.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Belg. kommer, id.

CUMMER, KIMMER, s.
 1. A gossip, S.
Kelly.

Fr. commere, a she-gossip.

 2. A young girl, Ang.

Cummerlyke, adj. Like cummers or gossips, Dunbar.

CUMMOCK, s. A short staff with a crooked head, S. O.
Burns.

Gael. cam, crooked, with the mark of diminution added.

CUMRAYD, pret. v. Encumbered, embarrassed.
Wyntown.

To CUN, v. a.
 1. To learn, to know, E. con.
Douglas.
 2. To taste.
Montgomerie.

A. S. cunn-an. scire.

Cunnand, part. pr. Knowing, skilful.
Wyntown.

Cunning, s. Knowledge.
Acts Ja. I.

A. S. cunnyng, experientia.

CUNNAND, s. Covenant.
V. Connand.
Barbour.

CUNDIE, s. An apartment, a concealed hole, Ang.

O. Fr. conduit, a shop; boutique.

CUNING, s. A rabbit; S. kinnen, E. conie.
Dunbar.

Belg. konyn, Sw. kanin, Gael. coinnin, id.; Lat. cuniculus.

Cuningar, s. A warren, S.
Acts Ja. I.

Sw. kaningaard, from kanin, id. and gaard, an inclosure.

V. Yaire.

CUNYSANCE, s. Badge, cognisance.

Fr. cognoissance, id.

Gawan and Gol.

CUNTENYNG, s. Generalship.
V. Contenyng.

CUPPIL, s. Rafter.
V. Couple.

CUPPLIN, s. The lower part of the backbone, S. B.

CURAGE, s. Care, anxiety.
Douglas.

CURCUDDOCH,
 1. To dance curcuddoch, or curcuddie, a play among children, in which they sit on their houghs, and hop round in a circular form, S.
 2. Sitting close together, S. B.
Ross.
 3. Cordial.
Kelly.

To CURE, v. a. To care for.
Lyndsay.

Cure, s. Care, anxiety; Fr.
Palice Hon.

CURER, s. A cover, a dish.
Houlate.

To CURFUFFLE, v. a. To discompose, to dishevel, S.
V. Fuffle.
Ross.

CURIE, s. Search, investigation.
Douglas.

Fr. quer-ir, to inquire.

CURIOUS, adj. Anxious, fond, S.
Baillie.

To CURL, CURLE, s. To cause a stone to move alongst ice towards a mark, S.
Pennecuik.

Curler, s. One who amuses himself by curling, S.
Baillie.

Curling, s. The act of pushing stones on ice, S.
Pennant.

Curling-Stane, s. A stone used in curling, S.
Ramsay.

Teut. krull-en, sinuare, flectere.

CURLDODDY, s.
 1. Ribgrass.
Evergreen. Border Minstrelsy.
 2. Natural clover, S. Orkn.
Neill.

Curldoddies, s. pl. Curled cabbage, S.

CURLIES, s. pl. Colewort, of which the leaves are curled. S. B.

CURLOROUS, adj. Churlish, niggardly.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. ceorl, rusticus.

CURMURRING, s. Grumbling; that motion of the intestines produced by slight gripes, S.
Burns.

Teut. koer-en, gemere; morr-en, mur-murare.

CURN, KURN, s.
 1. A grain, a single seed, S.
 2. A particle, part of a grain, S.
Chalm. Air.
 3. A quantity, an indefinite number, S.
 4. A number of persons, S.
Journ. Lond.

Moes. G. kaurno, Su. G. korn, a grain.

Curny, adj. Grainy, S. Germ. kernicht.

CURPHOUR, s. The curfew.
Bannatyne Poems.

CURPLE, s. A crupper, S.

Fr. croupe.

CURPON, CURPIN, s.
 1. The rump of a fowl, S.
 2. Applied ludicrously to the buttocks of man, S.
Burns.

Fr. cropion, the rump.

To CURR, v. n. To coo, S.
V. Curmurring.

To CURR, v. n. To lean.

Isl. kure, avium more reclinatus quiesco.

CURRACH, CURROK, s. A skiff or small boat.

Gael. curach.

Bellenden.

CURRACK, CURROCH, s. A small cart made of twigs, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

Gael. cuingreach, a cart or waggon.

CURSOUR, S. COUSER, CUSSER, s. A stallion.
Wallace.

Fr. coursiere, a tilting horse.

CUSCHÉ, CUSSÉ, s. Armour for the thighs.
Wyntown.

Fr. cussot, id. from cuisse, the thigh.

CUSCHETTE, s. A ringdove.
V. Kowschot.

CUSHLE-MUSHLE, s. Earnest and continued muttering, S. B.
Ross.

Su. G. kusk-a, to soothe; musk-a, to hide.

CUSYNG, s. Accusation.
Wallace.

CUSSER, s.
V. Cursour.

CUSTOC, s.
V. Castock.

CUSTOMAR, CUSTOMER, s. One who receives duty on goods, S.
Acts Ja. IV.

CUSTROUN, s. A low-born fellow.
Polwart.

O. Fr. coestron, bâtard, enfant illegitime; Gl. Roquefort.

CUT, s. A lot. To draw cuts, to determine by lot.
Douglas.

CUT, s. A certain quantity of yarn, S.
Statist. Acc.

CUTE, COOT, s. The ankle, S.

Teut. kuyte, sura.

Lyndsay. Dunbar.

CUTE, s. A thing of no value.
Dunbar.

CUTE, adj. Clever, expert, S. B.

A. S. cuth, expertus.

To CUTER, v. a. To cocker, S.
V. Kuter.

CUTH, COOTH, s. The coalfish, before it be fully grown, Orkn.
Statist. Acc.

CUTHERIE, CUDDERIE, adj. Very susceptible of cold, S. B.

Belg. koud, cold, and ryk, denoting full possession of any quality.

CUTIKINS, s. pl. Spatterdashes, S.

From cute, the ancle.

To CUTLE, v. n. To wheedle; To cutle in with one, id. S.
Pitscottie.

Teut. quedel-en, garrire.

To CUTLE, v. a. To cutle corn, to carry corn out of water-mark to higher ground, W. Loth. cuthil. Perths.

Sax. kaut-en, Su. G. kiut-a, mutare.

CUT-POCK, s. The stomach of a fish, S. B.
Ross.

CUTTIE, s. The Black Gulliemet, S. O.
Fleming.

CUTTY, CUTTIE, adj. Short, S.

Gael. cutach, short, bobtailed.

Hence,

Cuttie, Cutie, s.
 1. A popgun.
Bp. Galloway.
 2. A spoon, S. Gael. cutag, id.
Ross.
 3. A short tobacco pipe, S.
Ramsay.

Cuttie-Boyn, s. A small tub for washing the feet in; Lanerks. Ayrs.

Cutty-Free, adj. Able to take one's food, S. B.

Cutty-Rung, s. A crupper, formed by a short piece of wood fixed to the saddle at each end by a cord, Mearns.

CUTTY-STOOL, s.
 1. A low stool, S.
 2. The stool of repentance, S.
V. Kittie.
Sir J. Sinclair.

From cutty, kittie, a light woman.

CUTTIT, CUTTED, adj.
 1. Abrupt, S.
R. Bruce.
 2. Laconic and tart, S.

Cuttetlie, Cuttedly, adv.
 1. With quick but unequal motion.
Burel.
 2. Suddenly, abruptly, S.
 3. Laconically and tartly, S.
Baillie.

CUTWIDDIE, s. The piece of wood by which a harrow is fastened to the yoke, Fife.

CUTWORM, s. A small white grub, which destroys vegetables, by cutting through the stem, S.

CUWYN, s. Stratagem.
V. Conuyne.

CUZ, adv. Closely, Ang.; synon. Cosie, q.v.



D

DA, s. Day.
V. Daw.
Douglas.

DA', DAE, DAY, s. Doe.
Acts Ja. VI.

A. S. da, Dan. daa, id.

DA, s. A sluggard.
V. Daw.

To DAB, DAUB, v. a.
 1. To peck, as birds do, S.
J. Nicol.
 2. To prick.
Popular Ball.

Dab, s.
 1. A stroke from the beak of a bird, S.
 2. A smart push.
Creichton.

DABLET, s. An imp, a little devil.

Fr. diableteau, id.

Watson's Coll.

To DACKER, DAIKER, v. a.
 1. To search; to search for stolen goods, S. B.
Ross.
 2. To engage, to grapple, S. B.
Poems Buch. Dial.
 3. To toil as in job work.
Gl. Sibb.
 4. To deal in a peddling way, S.
 5. To be slightly employed, S.

Gael. deachair-am, to follow; Flem. daecker-en, to fly about.

DACKLE, s. Suspence, hesitation; applied both to sensible objects, and to the mind, S. B.

Dacklin, part. pr.
 1. In a state of doubt, S. B.
 2. Slow, dilatory, S. B.

Dacklin, s. A slight shower; "a dacklin of rain," S. B.

To DAD, DAUD, v. a.
 1. To thrash, S. B.
 2. To dash, to drive forcibly, S.
Knox.
 3. To throw dirt so as to bespatter, S.
J. Nicol.

To Dad Down, v. n. To fall or clap down forcibly and with noise, S.
Ramsay.

Dad, s. A sudden and violent stroke, S.
Ramsay.

To DADDLE, DAIDLE, v. a.
 1. To draggle, S.
 2. To do any work in a slovenly way, Ang.

To DADDLE, DAIDLE, v. n.
 1. To be slow in motion or action, S.
 2. To waddle, to wriggle, S.
 3. To daddle and drink, to tipple, S.
V. Dawdie.

DADDLE, DADDLIE, s. A larger sort of bib, S.

To DAFF, v. n. To be foolish.
Polwart.

Sax. dav-en insanire; Su. G. dofw-a, sensu privare, dofn-a, stupere.

Daffery, s.
 1. Romping, frolicksomeness, S.
 2. Thoughtlessness, folly, S. B.
Ross.

Daffin, Daffing, s.
 1. Folly in general, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Pastime, gaiety, S.
Lyndsay.
 3. Excessive diversion.
Kelly.
 4. Matrimonial intercourse.
S. P. Repr.
 5. Derangement, frenzy.
Mellvill's MS.

Daft, adj.
 1. Delirious, stupid; S.
Bellenden.
 2. Foolish, unwise, S.
Lyndsay.
 3. Giddy, thoughtless, S.
Diallog.
 4. Playful, innocently gay, S.
Ramsay.
 5. Gay, to excess, S.
Ross.
 6. Wanton, S.
Shirrefs.
 7. Extremely eager for the attainment of any object, or foolishly fond in the possession of it, S.

Isl. dauf-r, dauft, fatuus, subtristis; Su. G. doef, stupidus.

Daft Days, The Christmas holidays, S.
Ferguson.

Daftly, adv. Foolishly, S.
Ramsay.

Daftlike, adj. Having the appearance of folly, S.
Ramsay.

Daftness, s. Foolishness.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

DAFFICK, s. A coarse tub or trough, Orkn.

To DAG, v. a. To shoot, to let fly.
Knox.

To DAG, v. n. To rain gently, S.

Isl. dogg-ua, rigo, Sw. dugg-a, to drizzle.

Dag, s.
 1. A thin, or gentle rain, S.

Isl. daugg, pluvia, Sw. dagg, a thick or drizzling rain.

 2. A thick fog, a mist, S.

Su. G. dagg, dew.

DAY-NETTLES, Dead nettles, an herb, S.

DAIGH, s. Dough, S.
Ramsay.

A. S. dah, id.

Daighie, s.
 1. Doughy, S.
 2. Soft, inactive, destitute of spirit, S.

DAIKER, s. A decad.
Skene.

Su. G. deker, id.

DAIKIT, part. pa. "It has ne'er been daikit," it has never been used, Ang.

DAIL, s.
 1. A part, a portion; E. deal.
 2. A number of persons.
Chr. K.
To have dale, to have to do.
Douglas.

DAIL, s. A ewe, which not becoming pregnant, is fattened for consumption.
Complaynt S.

DAIMEN, adj. Rare, occasional, S. auntrin, synon.

Daimen-Icker, s. An ear of corn met with occasionally, S.
Burns.

From A. S. aecer, an ear of corn, and perhaps diement, counted, from A. S. dem-an, to reckon.

DAINTA, DAINTIS, interj. It avails not, Aberd.
Ross.

Teut. dien-en, to avail, and intet, nothing.

DAYNTÉ, s. Regard.
Wyntown.

Dainty, s.
 1. Pleasant, good-humoured, S.
 2. Worthy, excellent, S.
Burns.

Isl. daindi, excellenter bonum quid; dandis madr, homo virtuosus; rendered in Dan., en brav mand, S. a braw man; perfectly synon. with "a dainty man."

Daintith, s. A dainty, S.
Kelly.

DAISE, s. The part of a stone bruised in consequence of the strokes of the pickaxe or chizzel, Ang.

DAYIS. To hald dayis, to hold a truce.
Wyntown.

DAYS of LAW, LAWDAYIS, The time, when those are summoned to attend, who have interest in a court of justice.
Wallace.

Isl. lagdag, dies lege praefinitus.

DAIT, s. Destiny.
Wallace.

DAYWERK, DAWERK, DARK, s. A day's work, S. darg.
V. Darg.

A. S. daegweorc, id.

Wyntown.

DALK, s. Varieties of slate clay, sometimes common clay, S.
Statist. Acc.

DALLY, s. The stick used in binding sheaves, Border.

DALLY, s.
 1. A girl's puppet, S. B. E. doll.
 2. A painted figure.
Morison.

DALLIS, 3 p. s. v. Dawns.
Godly Ball.

DALMATYK, s. A white dress worn by Kings and Bishops.
Wyntown.

Thus denominated, as being brought from Dalmatia.

To DAM, v. n. To urine.
Maitland P.

DAMBROD.
V. Dams.

DAMMAGEUS, adj. Injurious.
Bellenden.

To DAMMISH, v. a. To stun, to stupify, S.
Rollock.

Germ. damisch machen, to stun one's head.

DAMMYS, DAMMEIS, s. Damage.

Fr. dommage.

Gl. Sibb.

To DAMPNE, v. a. To condemn.

DAMS, s. pl. The game of draughts, S.

Sw. dam, dampsel, id.; dambraede, S. a dambrod.

DAN, s. A term equivalent to Lord, Sir.

O. Fr.

Douglas.

To DANCE his or her lane; a phrase expressive, either of great joy, or of violent rage, S.
James V.

To DANDER, v. n.
 1. To roam, S.
 2. To go about idly, to saunter, S.
Ramsay.
 3. To roam, without a fixed habitation, S.
Ferguson.
 4. To trifle, to mispend one's time, S.
 5. To bewilder one's self, from want of attention, or stupidity, S.
Burel.

DANDERS, s. pl. The refuse of a smith's fire, S.

DANDIE, DANDY, s. A principal person or thing; what is nice, fine, or possessing supereminence in whatever way, S.
V. Dainty.
R. Galloway.

DANDIEFECHAN, s. A hollow stroke on any part of the body, Fife.

To DANDILL, v. n. To go about idly.
Burel.

Fr. dandin-er, "to go gaping ilfavouredly," Cotgr.

DANDILLY, DANDILY, adj. Celebrated, S.B.
Ross.

Dandilly, s. A female who is spoiled by admiration, S.
Cleland.

Perhaps from the same origin with Dandill.

DANDRING, part. pr. Emitting an unequal sound.
Evergreen.

Teut. donder-en, tonare.

DANE, DAINE, adj. Gentle, modest.

O. Fr. dain, dainty, fine.

Lyndsay.

DANG, pret. of Ding, q. v.

DANGER, DAWNGER, s.
 1. The great exertion made by a pursuer, exposing another to imminent danger.
Wallace.
 2. In his dawnger, in his power.
Wyntown.
 3. But dawngere, without hesitation.
Barbour.

O. Fr. danger, power, dominion.

DANGER, adj. Perilous.
Wallace.

DANT, s.
V. Dent.
Priests Peblis.

To DANT, v. a. To subdue.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Danter, s. A tamer, a subduer.
Douglas.

To Danton, v. a. To subdue, S.

Fr. domter, donter, id.

Pitscottie.

To DARE, (pron. daar) v. n. To be afraid, to stand in awe, Ang.

Sw. darr-a, to quake, to tremble.

To DARE, Perhaps, to hurt.
V. Dere.
Sir Gawan.

DARE, adj. Stupid, dull.
Houlate.

Su. G. daere, stultus.

DARG, DARK, s.
 1. A day's work, S.; anciently daywerk, q. v.
Statist. Acc.
 2. A certain quantity of work, whether more or less than that of a day.
Kelly.

Darging, Darguing, s. The work of a day-labourer, S.
R. Galloway.

Darger, s. A day-labourer, S.
Minstrelsy Border.

DARGEIS, pl. Dirges.
Bannatyne P.

Dergie, S.
V. Dregie.

DARKLINS, adv. In the dark, S.
Burns.

To DARN, DERN, v. a. To conceal, S.
Acts Ja. VI.

To Dern, v. n. To hide one's self.

A. S. dearn-an, occultare.

Hudson.

Darn, adj. Secret, S.
Wallace.
In dern, adv. In secret.
Bannatyne P.

DARRAR, adj. Dearer.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

To DARREN, v. a. To provoke.

A. S. dearr-an, audere.

Douglas.

To DASCAN, v. n. To contemplate, to scan.
Burel.

Lat. de and scando, whence E. scan.

To DASE, DAISE, v. a.
 1. To stupify, S.
Wyntown.
 2. To benumb.
Douglas.

Su. G. das-a, languere, dase, stupidus.

DASE. On dase, alive, q. on days.
Gawan and Gol.

To DASH, v. a.
 1. To flourish in writing, S.
 2. To make a great shew, S.

Dash, s.
 1. A flourish in writing, S.
 2. A splendid appearance, S.
Ferguson.

DAS KANE, s. Singing in parts.

Lat. discant-us.

Montgomerie.

DASS, s.
 1. Dass of a hay stack, that part of it that is cut off with a hay-knife, Loth.
 2. A dass of corn, that which is left in the barn after part is removed, Fife.

C. B. das, a heap of grain, Teut. tas, id.

DASS, s. A stratum of stones, S.
Statist. Acc.

To DATCH, v. a. To jog, to skake, S. B. perhaps originally the same with E. dodge.

DATIVE, s. A power legally granted to one to act as executor of a latter will, when it is not confirmed by the proper heirs, S.
Acts Sedt.

DAUD, s. A large piece.
V. Dawd.

DAUE, adj. Listless, inactive.
V. Daw.
Dunbar.

DAVEL, DEVEL, s. A stunning blow, S.
Gl. Sibb.

To DAUER, DAIVER, v. a. To stun, to stupify, Loth.

To Dauer, Daiver, v. n.
 1. To become stupid.
Burel.
 2. To be benumbed, S. B.
Journ. Lond.

Su. G. daur-a, infatuare, Teut. daver-en, tremere.

To DAW, v. n. To dawn.
Wallace.

A. S. daeg-ian, Sw. dag-as, lucescere.

Daw, s. Day; O. E. dawe.

Dwne of Daw, dead.
Wyntown.

DAW, DA, s.
 1. A sluggard, S.
Douglas.
 2. Appropriated to a woman, as equivalent to E. drab, S. B.
Kelly.

Isl. daa, defect, fainting; deliquium animi.

DAW, s. An atom, a particle, S. B.

Anc. Goth, daa, vaporare.

DAWACHE, DAVOCH, s. As much land as can be properly laboured by eight oxen.
Quon. Att.

Gael, damh, pron. dav, an ox, and ach, field.

DAWCH, DAW, adj. Apparently the same with Daue, inactive.
Wallace.

DAWD, DAUD, s. A considerably large piece of any thing, S.
Kelly.

Isl. todde, portio, tomus.

Dawds and Blawds. The blades of colewort boiled whole, S.
Gl. Shirr.

DAWDIE, s. A dirty slovenly woman, S. B.  O. E. dowdy.

Isl. dauda doppa, foemella ignava.

Dawdie, adj. Slovenly, sluttish, S. B.

To Dawdle, v. n. To be indolent or slovenly, Perths.

DAW-FISH, s. The lesser Dog-fish, Orkn.
Barry.

DAWING, s. Dawn of day.
Barbour.

A. S. dagung, aurora.

DAWPIT, adj. In a state of mental imbecility, Ayrs.
V. Dowf.

To DAWT, DAUT, v. a.
 1. To fondle, to caress, S.
Ross.
 2. To dote upon.
Ramsay.

Isl. dad-ur, gestus amatorius.

Dauting, Dauteing, s. The act of fondling.
Dunbar.

Dawtie, Dawté, s.
 1. Kindness, endearment.
Dunbar.
 2. A darling, a favourite, S.
Sherrifs.

Dawtit, Dauted, part. pa. Fondled.

DAY NOR DOOR. I canna hear day nor door, I can hear nothing for noise, S. B.
Journal Lond.

To DE, DEE, v. n. To die.
Douglas.

Done to de, Killed.
Douglas.

DEAD MEN'S BELLS, Foxglove, S.

DEAF, adj.
 1. Flat, applied to soil, S.

Su. G. daufjord, terra sterilis.

 2. Without vegetable life; often applied to grain, S.

A. S. deaf corn, frumentum sterile.

 3. Rotten; as, a deaf nit, S. Teut. doove noot, id.

DEAMBULATOUR, s. A gallery.

Lat. deambulator-ium, id.

Douglas.

DEAN, DEN, s.
 1. A hollow where the ground slopes on both sides, S.
Statist. Acc.
 2. A small valley, S.
Statist. Acc.

A. S. den, vallis.

To DEAR, v. n. To savour.
Polwart.

DEARCH, DERCH, s. A dwarf.
V. Droich.
Evergreen.

DEASOIL, DEISHEAL, s. Motion contrary to that of the sun, Gael.

To DEAVE, v. n. To deafen.
V. Deve.

To DEAW, v. n. To rain gently, to drizzle, S. B.

A. S. deaw-ian, Belg. daw-en, id.

DEBAID, s. Delay.
Barbour.

To DEBAIT, v. a. To protect.
Bellenden.

To DEBAIT, v. a. To lower.
Douglas.

To DEBAIT, v. a. To be diligent in procuring any thing.
Bellenden.

Fr. debat-re, to strive.

DEBAITMENT, s. Contention.

Fr. debatement, id.

Palice Honour.

To DEBORD, v. n. To go beyond proper bounds.
More.

Fr. debord-er, to exceed rule.

Debording, s. Excess.

To DEBOUT, v. a. To thrust from; Fr. debout-er.
Godscroft.

DECAY, s. A decline, S.
Brand.

To DECORE, v. a. To adorn, Fr. decor-er.
R. Bruce.

DECOURTED, part. pa. Dismissed from court.
Melvill.

DEDE, DEID, s.
 1. Death, S., O.E.
Dunbar.
 2. The cause of death, S.
Minstrelsy Border.
 3. The manner of dying.
Wyntown.

A. S. ded, Su. G. doed, id.

Dedechack, s. The sound made by a woodwoom, S. Chackie-mill, S. B.

Dede-Ill, s. Mortal sickness.
Wyntown.

Dedlyke, adj. Deadly.

A. S. deadlic.

Wyntown.

Dede-Nip, s. A blue mark in the body, ascribed to necromancy; witch's nip, synon. S.

Teut. doode-nep, id.

Dede-Thraw, s.
 1. The agonies of death.

A. S. thrawan, agonizare.

Bellenden.

 2. Meat is said to be in the dead-thraw, when neither cold nor hot, S.
 3. Left in the dead-thraw, left unfinished, S.

To DEDEINYE, DEDANE, v. n. To deign.
Douglas.

DEE, s. A dairy-maid.
V. Dey.

DEEP, s. The deepest part of a river.
Law Case.

DEEPDRAUCHTIT, adj. Designing, crafty, S. from deep, and draucht a plan.

DEER-HAIR, DEERS-HAIR, s. Heath clubrush, S.
Minstrelsy Border.

To DEFAIK, v. a. To relax, to remit; Fr. defalqu-er.
Bellenden.

To DEFAILL, v. n. To wax feeble.

Fr. defaill-er.

Wallace.

To DEFAISE, v. a. To deduct.
Acts Marie.

Defaisance, s.
 1. Excuse, subterfuge.

Fr. defaite, a shift.

Acts Ja. IV.
 2. Defalcation, deduction.
Acts Marie.

DEFAME, s. Infamy.
Douglas.

DEFAWTYT, part. pa. Forfeited.
Barbour.

Fr. defaill-er, to make a default.

To DEFEND, v. a. To ward off.

Fr. defend-re, id.

King's Quair.

To DEFOUL, v. a.
 1. To defile.
Douglas.
 2. To dishonour.
Gawan and Gol.

Defowle, s. Disgrace.
Wyntown.

To DEFOUND, v. a. To pour down.

Lat. defund-o.

Douglas.

DEGEST, adj. Grave.
Douglas.

Lat. digest-us.

Degestlie, adv. Sedately.
Douglas.

DEGESTEABLE, adj. Concocted.

Fr. digest-er, to concoct.

Wallace.

DEGYSIT, part. pa. Disguised.
King's Quair.

Fr. deguis-er, to disguise.

DEGOUTIT, part. pa. Spotted.
King's Quair.

DEY, s. A dairy-maid, S. B. Dee, Loth.

Sw. deja, a dairy-maid.

Ross.

To DEY, v. n. To die.
Wyntown.

DEIL, DEILLE, s. Part, quantity.
A deille, any thing.
Wallace.
Half dele, the one half.
Douglas.

DEIL, DEEL, s. The devil, S.
Ramsay.

Deil's Dozen, the number thirteen, S.

Apparently from the idea, that the thirteenth is the devil's lot.

Deil's Dung, Assafoetida, named from its stench, S.

Deil's Snuffbox, the common puff-ball, S.

Deil's Spoons,
 1. Great water plantain, S.
 2. Broadleaved pondweed, S.

DEIR, adj. Bold, daring.
Gawan and Gol.

DEIR, adj. Wild.
Gawan and Gol.

Isl. dyr, a wild beast.

DEIR, DERE, s. A wild animal.

DEIR, s. Perhaps, precious.
Gawan and Gol.

DEIS, DESS, DEAS, s.
 1. The upper place in a hall, where the floor was raised, and a canopy spread over head.
Douglas.
 2. A long seat erected against a wall, S.
Wallace.
 3. A table.
Popular Ball.
 4. A pew in a church, S. B.
Popular Ball.

O. Fr. dais, a throne or canopy.

To DELASH, v. a. To discharge.

O. Fr. deslach-er, id.

R. Bruce.

To DELATE, v. a. To accuse, a law term, S.
Rollocke.

L. B. delat-are, id.

Delator, s. An accuser, S.
Rollocke.

DELF, s.
 1. A pit.
Douglas.
 2. A grave.
Wyntown.

Belg. delve, a pit; delv-en, to dig.

 3. Crockery, S. Hence delf-house, a pottery, S.

DELIERET, DELIRIE, adj. Delirious.
Burns.

To DELYVER, v. n.
 1. To deliberate.
Wyntown.
 2. To determine.
Bellenden.

Lat. deliber-are.

DELIUER, adj. Light, agile.
Barbour.

O. Fr. delivre, libre, degagé.

Deliuerly, adv. Nimbly.
Barbour.

DELTIT, part. adj. Treated with great care, for preventing injury, Banffs.

Isl. daella, indulgentius, dalaeti, admiratio; vera i dalaeti, haberi in delitiis.

To DELUGE, v. n. To dislodge.

Fr. delog-er, to remove.

Lyndsay.

To DEMANE, DEMAINE, v. a. To treat; generally to maltreat, S. B.

O. Fr. demain-er, traiter.

Dunbar.

To DEMAINE, DEMEAN, v. a. To punish by cutting off the hand.
Crookshank.

Lat. de and manus, Fr. main, hand.

DEMANYT, part. pa. Demeaned.
Barbour.

DEMELLE, s. Rencounter.
Ruddiman.

Fr. demel-er, to contest.

DEMELLIT, part. pa. Hurt, injured, Ang.

Demellitie, s. A hurt, Ang. q. the effects of a broil.

To DEMENT, v. a. To deprive of reason.
Baillie.

Demented, adj.
 1. Insane, S.
Wodrow.
 2. Unsettled in mind, S.
Baillie.

Lat. demens, insane.

Dementation, s. Derangement.
Wodrow.

DEMPSTER, DEMSTER, s.
 1. A judge, S. B.
 2. The officer of a court, who pronounces doom.
Justice Air.

A. S. dem-an, to judge.

DEMT, part. pa. Judged, doomed.
Barbour.

DEN, s. A hollow.
V. Dean.

DEN, s.
 1. A respectful title prefixed to names.
V. Dan.
Wyntown.
 2. A dean.
Houlate.

To DEN, v. a. To dam.
Barbour.

DENCE, adj. Danish.
Godly Ball.

Densman, s. A Dane.
Dunbar.

DENK, adj.
 1. Trim.
V. Dink.
Dunbar.
 2. Saucy, nice.
Dunbar.

DENSAIXES, s. pl. Danish axes.
Statist. Acc.

DENT, DINT, s. Affection.
To tyne dent of a person or thing, to lose regard, Ang.
Ferguson.

DENT, part. pa. Indented.

Fr. denté, id.

Gawan and Gol.

DENTILIOUN, s. Dandelion, an herb, S.

Fr. dent de lyon.

Douglas.

DEPAYNTIT, Painted.
King's Quair.

To DEPAIR, v. a. To ruin.
Palice Hon.

Fr. deper-ir, to perish.

To DEPART, DEPERT, v. a. To divide.

Fr. depart-ir, id.

Barbour.

To DEPESCHE, DEPISCHE, v. a. To dispatch.
Bellenden.

Fr. despesch-er, id.

To DEPONE, v. n. To testify on oath, S.

L. B. depon-ere, testari.

Statist. Acc.

To DEPRISE, v. a. To depreciate.

Fr. despris-er.

Lyndsay.

To DEPULYE, v. a. To spoil.
Douglas.

Fr. depouill-er.

To DER, v. a. To hazard.
Barbour.

A. S. dear-ian, Belg. derr-en, id.

DERAY, s.
 1. Disorder.
Barbour.
 2. Mirthful noise at a banquet.
Douglas.

Fr. desroy, deroi, disorder.

To DERE, DEIR, v. a.
 1. To hurt.
Douglas.
 2. To dere upon, to make impression, S. B.

A. S. der-ian, nocere.

Dere, Der, Deir, s. Injury.
Wallace.

To DERE, v. a. To fear.
Burel.

DERE, s. Any beast of game.
Wyntown.

A. S. deor, Su. G. diur, Isl. dyr, id.

DERE, s. A precious person.
Houlate.

To DEREYNE, DERENE, DERENYHE, v. a. To determine a controversy by battle.
Barbour.

O. Fr. derainier, prouver son droit en justice; Roquefort.

Dereyne, Derenye, s. Contest, decision.
Barbour.

To DERENE, v. a. To disorder.
Dunbar.

DERETH, s. Some kind of office anciently held in S.
Chart. Dunf.

To DERNE, v. a. Perhaps for darren.
Hudson.

DERF, adj.
 1. Bold and hardy.
Douglas.
 2. Capable of great exertion.
Douglas.
 3. Possessing a sullen taciturnity, S. B.
 4. Severe, cruel.
Wallace.

Isl. diarf-ur, Su. G. diaerf, daring.

Derffly, adv. Vigorously.
Wallace.

DERGAT, s. Target.
Wyntown.

Gael. targaid.

To DERN, v. a. To hide.
V. Darn, v.

To DERT, v. a. To dart.
King's Quair.

To DESCRIVE, DISCRYVE, v. a. To describe, S.
Hamilton.

To DESPITE, v. n. To be filled with indignation, S. B.

Fr. se despit-er.

DET, s. Duty.

Fr. dette.

Palice Hon.

Detfull, adj. Due.
Knox.

Dettit, part. pa. Indebted.
Bellenden.

DETBUND, adj. Predestinated.
Douglas.

O. Fr. det, a die.

To DEUAIL, DEUAL, v. n.
 1. To descend.
Douglas.
 2. v. a. To let fall.
Palice Honour.

Fr. devall-er.

Devall, s. A sunk fence, Clydesd.

To DEVALL, DEVALD, v. n. To cease, to intermit, S.
Ferguson.

Su. G. dwal-a, to delay.

Devall, Devald, s. A cessation, S.

Isl. duaul, mora.

DEUCH, TEUCH, s.
 1. A draught, a potation, S.
V. Teuch.
 2. Drink in general, S. B.

Deuchandorach, Deuchandoris, s.
 1. A drink taken at the door, S.
 2. Equivalent to stark-love and kindness, S.

Gael. deoch an doruis, the parting drink.

To DEVE, DEAVE, v. a. To stupify with noise, S.
King Hart.

Su. G. doef-wa, Isl. deyf-a, to deafen.

DEVEL, s. A stunning blow.
V. Davel.

To DEVISE, DIUISS, DEUYS, v. a. To talk.

Fr deuis-er, id.

Barbour.

DEUGIND, adj. Wilful, litigious, Caithn.

DEUK, s. Covert, shelter, S. B.
V. Jouk.

DEULE WEEDS, mourning weeds.

Fr. deuil, mourning.

Acts Ja. VI.

DEVORE, DEUORE, s. Service.

Fr. devoir.

Wyntown.

DEW, adj. Moist.
Douglas.

DEW, pret. Dawned.
V. Daw.
Wallace.

DEWGAR, s. A salutation.
Wallace.

Fr. Dieu garde.

DEWGS, s. pl. Rags, shreds, S.
Ramsay.

To DEWYD, DEWOYD, v. n. To divide.
Wallace.

To DEWYSS, DIUISS, v. a. To divide.

Fr. devis-er, id.

Barbour.

DEWYT, deafened, stunned.
V. Deve.

DEWOR, DEWORY, s. Duty.
Barbour.

DEW-PIECE, s. A piece of bread given to servants when going out early to their work, S. B.
Sinclair.

DGUHARE, Houlate. Leg.
Alquhare.

DIBBER-DERRY, s. Confused debate, S. B.
Ross.

DIBLER, s. A large wooden platter.
Burrow Lawes.

O. E. dobeler, O. Fr. doublier, assiette.

To DICE, v. a. To sew in a waved form, S. B.
Ross.

To DICHT, DYCHT, v.
 1. To prepare.
Douglas.

A. S. diht-an, Germ. dicht-en, parare.

 2. To deck, S.
Douglas.
 3. To dress food.
Ritson.
 4. To polish.
Douglas.
 5. To wipe, S.
Colvil.
 6. To dry by rubbing, S.
Ross.
 7. To sift, S. Cumb.
Burns.
 8. To treat, to handle.
Douglas.
 9. To handle, applied to the mind, S. B.

Belg. dicht-en, Su. G. dicht-a, to compose.

 10. To drub, S. B.
Hamilton.
 11. To make an end of.
Douglas.

Dichtings, s. pl.
 1. Refuse, S.
Ross.
 2. The refuse of corn, S. synon. shag.

To DICT, v. a. To dictate.
V. Dite.

To DIDDLE, v. n.
 1. To move like a dwarf, S.
Ramsay.
 2. To shake, to jog.
Burns.

Isl. dudd-est, segnipes esse.

DIE, s. A toy, a gewgaw, Loth.

DIET-BOOKE, s. A diary.
Calderwood.

L. B. diaet-a, iter unius diei.

DIFFER, s. A difference, S.
Bp. Forbes.

DIFFICIL, adj. Difficult.
Complaynt S.

To DIFFOUND, v. a. To diffuse.
Douglas.

DIGNE. adj. Worthy.
V. Ding.

DIKE, DYK, s.
 1. A wall, S.
Kelly.
 2. A vein of whinstone, traversing the strata of coal, S.
Statist. Acc.
 3. A ditch.
Wallace.

A. S. dic, Su. G. dike, id.

To Dyk, v. a. To inclose with ramparts or ditches.
Barbour.

Diker, Dyker, s. One who builds inclosures of stone, generally without lime; also dry-diker, S.
Statist. Acc.

To DILL, v. a. To conceal.
Callander.

Isl. dyll-a, Su. G. doel-ja, occultare.

To DILL, v. a. To assuage or remove.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. dilg-ian, delere; Isl. dill-a, lallare.

To Dill Down, v. n. To subside.
Baillie.

DILATOR, s. A delay; old law term.

L. B. dilatare, to delay.

Baillie.

DILP, s. A trollop.
Ross.

Sw. toelp, an awkward fellow.

To DYMENEW, v. a. To diminish.
Douglas.

To DIN, DYN, v. n.
 1. To make a noise.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. To resound.

A. S. dyn-an, id.

Barbour.

DYND, part. pa.
Bannatyne Poems.

To DING, v. a.
 1. To drive,
S. Bellenden.
 2. To exert one's self.
Henrysone.
 3. To beat.
Wyntown.
 4. To strike by piercing.
Bellenden.
 5. To scourge, to flog.
Acts Ja. I.
 6. To overcome, S.
Ferguson.
 7. To excel. S.
Ramsay.
 8. To discourage, S. B.
Ferguson.
 9. To ding down, to overthrow, S.
Barbour.
 10. To ding in, to drive in, S.
 11. To ding off, to drive from.
Douglas.
 12. To ding on, to attack with violence.
Barbour.
 13. To ding out, to expel.
Bellenden.
To ding out the bottom of any thing, to make an end of it, S.
Baillie.
 14. To ding ouer, to overthrow, also to overcome, S.
Poems Buchan Dial.
 15. To ding throw, to pierce.
Bellenden.
 16. To ding to dede, to kill with repeated strokes.
Wallace.

Isl. daeng-ia, Su. G. daeng-a, tundere.

To Ding, v. n.
 1. To drive.
Douglas.
It's dingin on, it rains, or snows, S.
 2. To ding down, to descend.
Lyndsay.

DING, DIGNE, adj. Worthy.
Douglas.

Fr. digne, Lat. dign-us.

DINGLEDOUSIE, s. A stick ignited at one end; foolishly given as a plaything to a child; Dumfr.

Su. G. dingl-a, to swing, and dusig, dizzy.

DINK, DENK, adj.
 1. Neat, trim, S.
Evergreen.
 2. Precise, saucy, Fife.
A. Douglas.

Alem. ding, gay.

Dinkly, adv. Neatly.
R. Galloway.

To DINLE, DYNLE, v. n.
 1. To tremble, S.
Douglas.
 2. To make a great noise.
Ferguson.
 3. To thrill, to tingle.
J. Nicol.

Dinle, s.
 1. Vibration, S.
 2. A vague report, S. B.

DINMONT, DIMMENT, DILMOND, s. A wedder in the second year. S. q. twelve-months.
Complaynt S.

DINNEN SKATE, The young of the Raia Batis.
Sibbald.

DINT, s. An opportunity, S.
Ross.

DINT, s. Affection.
V. Dent.

DYOUR, s. A bankrupt.
Dunbar.

DIRD, s. An achievement; used ironically, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Teut. dagh-vaerd, Isl. dagferd, a day's journey.

Dirdum, s. Deed, achievement, S.B. ibid.

Dirdum-Dardum, s. A term, expressive of contempt for an action.
Chr. Kirk.

DIRD, s. A stroke, Aberd.
Ross.

Fr. dourd-er, to beat.

DIRDUM, s.
 1. An uproar, S.
King Hart.

C. B. dowrd, sonitus, strepitus.

 2. Damage. "To dree the dirdum," to do penance, S. B.
 3. Passion, ill humour, Perths.

Gael. diardan. surliness, anger.

DIRK, s. A dagger.
V. Durk.

DIRK, DYRK, adj. Dark.
Wallace.

A. S. deorc.

To DIRK, v.n. To grope in utter darkness.
Ferguson.

To Dirkin, v. n. To act clandestinely.
Dunbar.

To Dirkin, v. a. To darken.
Douglas.

Dirkit, part. adj. Darkened.
Dunbar.

Dirkness, s. Darkness.
Dunbar.

To DIRLE, v. a. To pierce, E. drill.
Bannatyne MS.

Su. G. drill-a, perforare.

To DIRLE, v. n.
 1. To tingle, to thrill, S.
Ramsay.
 2. To emit a tingling sound, S.
Burns.

Dirl, s.
 1. A slight tremulous stroke, S.
 2. The pain caused by such a stroke, S.
 3. A vibration, S.
Burns.

Dirling, s. A short-lived smarting pain, S.
Douglas.

DIRR, adj.
 1. Torpid, benumbed, Loth.
 2. Insensible, used in a moral sense, Loth.

Su. G. daer-a, infatuare.

To Dirr, v. n. To be benumbed, ibid.

DIRT, s. Excrement, S.

Dirtin, adj.
 1. Defiled with excrement, S.
 2. Mean, contemptible, S.
Bellenden.

Dirt-fear'd, adj. So much afraid as to lose the power of retention, S.
Hamilton.

To DISAGYIS, To disguise.
Gl. Complaynt.

DYSCHOWYLL, adj. Undressed.

Fr. deshabillé, id.

Wallace.

DISCENSE, s. Descent.
Douglas.

Lat. descens-us.

DISCREET, adj. Civil.
Sir J. Sinclair.

Discretion, Civility, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

To DISCRIUE, v. a. To describe.
Douglas.

To DISCURE, v. a. To observe accurately.
Douglas.

Fr. discour-ir, to survey.

Discourrour, s. A scout.
Barbour.

DISDOING, adj. Not thriving, Clydes.

DISEIS, DISSESE, s.
 1. Want of ease.
Barbour.
 2. State of warfare.
Wyntown.

Fr. desaise, "a being ill at ease," Cotgr.

To DISHAUNT, v. a. To leave any place or company.
Spotswood.

Fr. deshant-er.

To DISHERYS, v. a. To disinherit.
Barbour.

Disherysown, s. The act of disinheriting.
Wyntown.

DISHILAGO, s. The vulgar name of Tussilago or colt's-foot, S.

DISHORT, s.
 1. Displeasure.
Chron. S. P.
 2. A disappointment, Aberd.
 3. Any thing prejudicial, S.

From dis, and short, v. to recreate.

DISJASKIT, part. pa.
 1. Disjaskit-like, exhibiting every appearance of a decay in circumstances, S. B.

Probably allied to Dan. jask-er, hask-er, sordide habeo.

 2. Having a downcast look, S. B.

DISJUNE, DISJOON, s.
 1. Breakfast, S. B.

O. Fr. desjune.

Ross.
 2. To make a disjune of, to swallow up at once.
Baillie.

DISMAL, s. A mental disease, probably melancholy.
Polwart.

DYSMEL, s. Apparently, necromancy.
Priests Peblis.

A. Goth, dys, dea mala, et mal, Moes. G. mel, tempus praefinitum.  Inde dis-mal dies vindictae; Seren.

DYSOUR, s. One who plays at dice.
Dunbar.

DISPARAGE, s. Disparity of rank.
Skene.

DISPARIT, DISPERT, adj.
 1. Desperate.
Douglas.
 2. Keen, violent, incensed, S. B.

To DISPARPLE, v. n. To be scattered.
V. Sparpell.
Hudson.

To DISPEND, v. a. To expend.

Fr. dispend-re.

Barbour.

Dispending, s. Expences.
Barbour.

Dispence, Dyspens, s. Expence.

Fr. despens.

Wyntown.

DYSPYTUWS, adj. Despiteful.

Fr. despiteux.

Wyntown.

To DISPLENISH, v. a. To disfurnish, S.
V. Plenys, v.
Baillie.

DISSAIF, s. Insecurity.
Wallace.

DISSEMBILL, adj. Unclothed.

Fr. deshabill-é, id.

Wallace.

DYSTANS, DISTAWNS, s. Dissension.
Wyntown.

L. B. distenc-io, contentio, lis.

DISTY-MELDER, s.
 1. The last quantity of meal made of the crop of one year, S.
 2. Metaph. one's latter end, S. B.
Journal Lond.

To DISTRUBIL, DISTROUBLE, v. a. To disturb.
Douglas.

Distrowblyne, s. Disturbance.
Barbour.

To DIT, DYT, DITT, v. a. To close up, S.
Douglas.

A. S. dytt-an, occludere, obturare.

To DITE, DYTE, DICT, v. a.
 1. To indite, S.
Wallace.
 2. To dictate to an amanuensis, S.
Baillie.
 3. To indict.
Henrysone.

Teut. dicht-en, Sw. dickt-a, to compose; Germ. dicht-en, sententiam dicere, literis mandare.

Dyte, s. Composition.
Wyntown.

Ditement, s. Any thing indited.
Sir W. More.

Dittay, Dyttay, s. Indictment.
Wallace.

DIV, DO. I div, I do, S.

DIVE, s. The putrid moisture, which issues from the mouth, &c. after death, S. B.

Divie, adj. Having much dive, S. B.

To DIVERT, v. n. To turn aside;

Lat. divert-ere.

Baillie.

DIVET, DIFFAT, DIVOT, s. A thin flat oblong turf, used for covering cottages, and also for fuel, S.
Acts Ja. VI.

Lat. defod-ere, to dig.

DIUINE, s. A soothsayer.
Douglas.

Fr. devin, id.

DYVOUR, s. A bankrupt.
Skene.

Fr. devoir, duty.

Dyuourie, s. Declaration of bankruptcy.
Skene.

DIXIE, s. Severe reprehension, S. q. the sentence of a pedagogue, Lat. dixi, "I have said it."

To DO, v. a. To avail.
V. Dow.
Wallace.

To DO in-to, to bring into.
Wyntown.

DO, s. pron. doe, A piece of bread, S. A.

Fr. dôt, a portion.

DOACH, DOAGH, s. A wear or cruive.
Statist. Acc.

DOCHT, pret. Could, availed.
V. Dow, 1.

DOCHTER, DOUCHTYR, s. Daughter, S.
Bellenden.

Dochter-Dochter, s. Grand daughter.

Sw. doter doter, id.

Wyntown.

DOCHLY, adv. Perhaps for dochtely, powerfully; from A. S. dochtig.
Houlate.

DOCHTY, adj. Malapert, S. an oblique sense of E. doughty.

To DOCK, v. a. To flog the hips, S.

Teut. dock-en, dare pugnos.

DOCK, DOK, s.
 1. Podex, S.
Kennedy.
 2. Stern of a ship.
Pitscottie.

DOCKEN, DOKEN, s. The dock, an herb, S.
Ritson.

DOCKER, s. Struggle, S. B.
V. Dock, v.
Ross.

DOCKUS, s. Any thing very short, S.

DOCUS, s. A stupid fellow, S.

Germ. docke, a puppet.

DOD, s. A slight fit of ill-humour, S.

Gael. sdoid, id.

Doddy, adj. Pettish, S.

Gael. sdodach.

To DODD, v. n. To jog, Fife.

Isl. dudd-est, segnipes esse.

DODDY, DODDIT, adj.
 1. Without horns, S.
 2. Bald, without hair, S. B.

Doddie, s. A cow wanting horns, S.

To DODGE, v. n. To jog, S. A.
Gl. Sibb.

DOFART, adj. Stupid.
V. Duffart.

DOGDRIVE, DOG DRAVE, s. A state of ruin.
Ramsay.

DOG-HIP, s. The fruit of the Dog-rose, S.

DOG-NASHICKS, s. Something resembling the gall-nut, produced by an insect depositing its ova on the leaves of the Trailing willow, S. B.

DOG'S CAMOVYNE, Weak-scented feverfew, also Dog-gowan, S. B.

DOG'S SILLER, Yellow rattle or Cock's comb, S.

DOG'S TANSY, s. Silver-weed, S.

Doggis, s. pl. Swivels.
Complaynt S.

Norm. Fr. dagge, a small gun.

DOG-LATIN, s. Macaronic Latin. S.
Ruddiman.

DOGONIS, s. pl. Suitors.
Dunbar.

To DOYCE, v. a. To give a dull heavy stroke, Ang.

Doyce, s.
 1. A dull heavy stroke, Ang.; douss, a blow, S.
V. Dusch.
 2. The flat sound caused by the fall of a heavy body, Ang.

DOID, v. imp. It becomes, Fr. doit.
Henrysone.

DOIL, s. A piece of any thing, as of bread, Ang. dole, E.

DOIL'D, DOILT, adj.
 1. Stupid, confused, S.
Polwart.
 2. Crazed, S.
Gl. Shirr.

Su. G. dwal-a, stupor; ligga i dwala, jacere in sopore.

DOYN, DONE, DOON, DOONS, DUNZE, adv. Very, in a great degree, a mark of the superlative, S.
Bellenden.
Doon weil, or dunze weil, very well, S.

Isl. daeends, id. as daeends wael, excellently, dae waenn, very beautiful, from daa, an old primitive or particle, denoting any thing good, worthy or excellent.

Doonlins, adv. The same. No that doonlins ill, not very bad, S. B.

DOISTER, DYSTAR, s. A storm from the sea, Ang.

Isl. thustar, aer incipit inclemens fieri.

DOIT, s. A small copper coin formerly current in S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

To DOYTT, v. n.
 1. To dote.
Lyndsay.
 2. To move as signifying stupidity, S.

DOITIT, DOYTIT, part. adj. Stupid, confused. S.
Dunbar.

Belg. dot-en, delirare, Dan. doede, stupid.

Doit, s. A fool, a numskull, S.

Doit, s. A disease, perhaps stupor.
Watson.

Doittrie, s. Dotage, S.
Philotus.

Doitrified, part. pa. Stupified, S.

DOKEN, s. The dock.
V. Docken.

DOLE, s. A doxy.
Gl. Shirr.

DOLENT, adj. Mournful.
Lyndsay.

DOLESS, DOWLESS, adj. Without exertion, S. Doingless, id.

Sw. dugloes, id.

DOLF, adj.
V. Dowf.

Dolfness, s. Want of spirit.
Douglas.

DOLFISH, s. Leg. Dog-fish.
Statist. Acc.

DOLLY, DOLIE, DULLY, adj. Dull, S. dowie.
Douglas.

Su. G. daalig, tristis.

DOLLYNE, part. Buried.
Dunbar.

A. S. be-dolfen, id., Teut. dolv-en, inhumare, humo tegere, sepelire, Kilian.

DOLPE, s. A cavity, S. dowp.
Douglas.

Belg. dop, a shell or husk.

DOME, s. Judgment, sentiment.
S. P. Repr.

DOMINIE, s.
 1. A pedagogue, S.
Forbes.
 2. A contemptuous name for a minister, S.
Ritson.

DON, s. A favourite, S., perhaps from Hisp. Don.

DONGYN, DOUNGIN, part. pa. of Ding.

DONIE, s. A hare, Ang.

A. S. don, damula?

DONK, adj. Damp, E. dank.
Douglas.

Su. G. dunk-en, id.

Donk, s. Moisture, perhaps mouldiness.
Douglas.

To DONNAR, v. a. To stupify, Fife.
A. Douglas.

Donnard, Donner'd, adj. In a state of gross stupor, S.
Ramsay.

Germ. donner-n, to thunder, q. stupified with noise, like bedundert.

DONSIE, DONCIE, adj.
 1. Affectedly neat and trim, implying the idea of self-importance, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Obliquely signifying pettish, testy, S.
 3. Restive, applied to a horse, S.
Burns.
 4. Unlucky; in a moral sense.
Burns.
 5. Dull and dreary.
Hamilton.

Germ. duns-en, to swell; intumescere.

DONTIBOURS, DOUNTIBOURIS, s. pl. Probably, courtezans.
Knox.

Fr. domter, to tame, and bourse, the purse; unless the last term be used in the grosser sense mentioned by Cotgr.

DOOCK, DUCK, s. Strong coarse cloth, Ang.
Sail-doock, that used for sails. Pron. doock.
Statist. Acc.

Teut. doeck, id.  Su. G. duk.

To DOODLE, v. a. To dandle, S. B.

Fr. dodin-er, dodelin-er, id.

DOOF, s., A stupid fellow.
V. Dowf.

DOOK, s. A peg, S.

Belg. deuvig, id.

DOOL, s. The goal in a game.
V. Dule.

DOOL, s. To thole the dool, to bear the evil consequences of any thing, Ang.

Fr. deuil, grief.

Dool-like, adj. Having the appearance of sorrow.
Rutherford.

DOOLIE, s.
 1. A hobgoblin, S. B.
 2. A scarecrow, a bugbear, S. B.

A. S. deoul, diabolus, Isl. dolg-r, spectrum.

DOOMSTER, s. One who pronounces doom.
Rutherford.

DOOR, s. Durk and door.
Ritson.

DOOZIL, s.
 1. An uncomely woman, S. B.
 2. A lusty child, S. B.

Isl. dusill, servus, servulus.

DORDERMEAT, s. A bannock given to farm-servants, after loosing the plough, between dinner and supper, Ang.

Su. G. dagwerd, a meal, from dag, day, and ward, food, sometimes dogoerdar.

DORECHEEK, s. The door-post, S.

DORESTANE, s. The threshold, S.

DOREN. Probably, dare.
Wallace.

DORLACH, s. A bundle, or truss, Gael.
Baillie.

DORNICK, s. Linen cloth used in S. for the table; from Tournay, Teut. Dornick.

Lyndsay.

DORT, s. Pet, commonly in pl.
Ross.

To Dort, v. n. To become pettish, S.
Shirrefs.

Dorty, adj.
 1. Pettish, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.
 2. Saucy, malapert, S.
 3. Applied to a female who is saucy to her suitors, S.
Ramsay.
 4. Applied to plants, when difficult to rear, S. B.

Gael. dorrda, austere.

Dortyness, s. Pride, arrogance.
Douglas.

DOROTY, s.
 1. A doll, S.
 2. A female of a very small size, S.

DOSK, adj. Dark-coloured.
Douglas.

DOSS, adj. Neat, spruce, Clydes.

Teut. doss-en, munire vestibus suffultis.

Dost up, part. pa. Dressed sprucely.
Kennedy.

DOSS, s. A tobacco pouch, Aberd.

Isl. dos, Germ. dose, a box.

Shirrefs.

To Doss, Dossie down, v. a. To pay, S.
Ferguson.

DOTAT, part. pa. Endowed.
Bellenden.

DOT, s.
 1. A dotard.
Sir Tristrem.
 2. A state of stupor.
Z. Boyd.

DOTED, part. pa. Given as a donation.
Acts Ja. VI.

DOTHER, s. Daughter, Ang.
Ross.

To DOTTAR, v. n. To become stupid.
Evergreen.

DOTTLE, s. A small particle, S. dot, E.

DOTTLE, adj. In a state of dotage, S.

Teut. ver-doetelt, repuerascens.

DOUBLE, s. A duplicate, S.
Baillie.

To Double, v. a. To take a duplicate of, id.

To DOUCE, v. a. To knock, Fife.
V. Doyce.
Douglas.

Douce, s. A stroke, Fife. Id.

DOUCE, DOUSE, adj.
 1. Sedate, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Modest, opposed to wantonness, S. B.
 3. Of a respectable character, S.
Burns.

Fr. doux, douce, mild, gentle.

Doucely, adv. Soberly, prudently, S.

DOUD, s. A woman's cap with a caul, Ang.

To DOVER, v. n. To slumber, S. synon. sloom, S. B.
A. Douglas.

Isl. dofw-a, stupere.

Douerit, Dowerit, part. pa. Drowsy.
Douglas.

Dover, s. A slumber, S.

Isl. dur, somnis levis.

To DOUK, v. a. To duck, S.
Douglas.

Belg. duck-en, id.

DOUL'D, part. pa. Fatigued, Fife.
V. Doud.
A. Douglas.

DOULE, s., A fool.
Houlate.

A. S. dole, fatuus.

DOUNGEOUN, s.
 1. The strongest tower belonging to a fortress.
Barbour.

Fr. donjon.

 2. A tower in general.
Lyndsay.

DOUNT, s. A stroke, a blow.
V. Dunt, s.

To DOUN THRING, v. a.
 1. To overthrow.
Lyndsay.
 2. To undervalue.
V. Thring.
Douglas.

DOUNWITH, adv.
 1. Downwards, S.
Wallace.

A. S. adun, deorsum, and with, versus.

 2. As a s. To the dounwith, downwards, S.

To DOUP, v. n. To incline the head or shoulders downwards, S.
Evergreen.

Teut. dupp-en, verticem capitis demittere.

Doup. In a doup, adv. In a moment.
Ramsay.

DOUP, DOWP, DOLP, s. The breech or buttocks, S.
Ramsay.
 2. The bottom, or extremity of any thing.
Ruddiman.
 3. A cavity, S.
Ferguson.

Isl. doef, clunes, posterior pars beluae.

DOUR, DOURE, adj.
 1. Hard.
Lyndsay.
 2. Bold, intrepid.
Douglas.
 3. Hardy, synon. with derf.
Douglas.
 4. Inflexible, obstinate, S.
Douglas.
 5. Stern; a dour look, S.
Wallace.
 6. Severe; applied to the weather, S.
Burns.

Lat. dur-us; C. B. dewr, audax.

Dourly, adv.
 1. Without mercy.
Lyndsay.
 2. Pertinaciously.
Bannatyne Poems.

DOURTY, Leg. dourly.
Gawan and Gol.

DOUSE, adj. Solid.
V. Douce.

DOUSS, s. A blow, a stroke.
V. Doyce.

DOUT, DOUTE, s.
 1. Fear, S.
Barbour.
 2. Ground of apprehension.
Wyntown.

Fr. doute, id.

Doutance, s. Doubt.
Lyndsay.

Fr. doubtance.

DOUTSUM, adj.
 1. Hesitating.
Nat. Cov.
 2. Uncertain, as to the event.
Bellenden.

To DOW, v. n.
 1. To be able. Pret. docht, dought.
Dunbar.

A. S. dug-an, valere.

 2. To avail, to profit.
Douglas.

Teut. doogh-en, prodesse.

Dow, s. Worth, avail.
Gl. Sibb.

Teut. doogh, commodum.

DOW, s. A dove, S.

A. S. duua.

Douglas.

To DOW, v. n.
 1. To thrive, as to health, S.
Ross.
 2. To thrive, in a moral sense, S.

Alem. douch-en, doh-en, crescere, proficere.

To DOW, v. n.
 1. To fade, to wither, S.
Ferguson.
 2. To lose freshness, S.
Ramsay.
 3. To dose, S. B.
Ross.
 4. To neglect, S. B.
Morison.

Alem. douu-en, perire.

DOWBART, s. A stupid fellow.
V. Dowfart.
Dunbar.

DOWBRECK, s. A species of fish, Aberd.

Gael. dubhbreac, a smelt.

DOWCATE, s. A pigeon-house.
Acts Ja. IV.

DOWCHSPERIS, DOWSY PEIRS, s. pl. The twelve peers, the supposed companions of K. Arthur.
Wyntown.

O. Fr. les douz pers, or pairs.

DOWF, DOLF, s.
 1. Destitute of courage or animation, S.
Douglas.
 2. Melancholy, gloomy, S.
Ramsay.
 3. Lethargic.
Douglas.
 4. Hollow; applied to sound, S.
 5. Silly, frivolous, S.
Burns.

Su. G. dauf, stupidus; Isl. daup-r, subtristis.

Douf, Doof, s. A dull stupid fellow.
Dunbar.

Dowfart, Dofart, adj.
 1. Destitute of spirit, S.; pron. as Gr. υ.
Poems Buchan Dial.
 2. Dumpish, melancholy, S.
 3. Feeble, inefficient, S.

From dowf and Su. G. art, Belg. aert, disposition.

Dowfart, Doofart, s. A dull, inactive fellow, S.
Ramsay.

Duffie, adj.
 1. Soft, spungy, S. fozie, synon.
 2. Stupid, transferred to the mind, S.

DOWY.
V. Dolly.

DOWYD, pret. Endowed.

Fr. dou-er.

Wyntown.

DOWKAR, s. A diver.
Kennedy.

Su. G. dokare, Belg. duycker, id.

DOWNCOME, DOUNCOME, s.
 1. Act of descending.
Douglas.
 2. A fall, in whatever sense, S.
 3. Overthrow.
Ruddiman.

DOWNDRAUGHT, s. Whatsoever depresses, S.

DOWNLYING, s. At the down-lying, about to be brought to bed, S.

DOWNLOOK, s. Scorn, contempt, S.
Ross.

DOWNSITTING, s. Session of a court, S.
Baillie.

DOWNTAK, s. Cause of imbecility, S.

DOWRE. Q. dourly. hardly.
Wyntown.

DOWRIER, DOWARIAR, s. Dowager.

Fr. Douairiere, id.

Acts Marie.

DOWTIT, part. pa. Feared.
Barbour.

Fr. doubt-er, to dread.

DOXIE, adj. hazy, restive, S.

Isl. dosk-a, to delay, dosk, inactivity.

To DOZEN, DOSEN, v. a.
 1. To stupify.
Barbour.
 2. To benumb. Dozent with cauld, S.
 3. Denoting impotency.
Ramsay.

Su. G. daase, stupified; Isl. das-ast, languere.

To Dozen, v. n. To become torpid, S.
Ramsay.

To DRABLE, DRAIBLE, v. a. To befoul, to slabber, S.

DRABLE, s. Perhaps a servant.
Houlate.

DRAFF, s.
 1. Grains, S.
Wallace.
 2. Metaph., any moral imperfection, S.

Teut. Isl. draf, siliquae excoctae.

Draff-pock, s.
 1. A sack for carrying grains, S.
 2. Metaph., any imperfection.
S. Prov.

DRAGON, s. A paper kite, S.

DRAGOUN, s. To raiss dragoun, to give up to military execution.
Barbour.

To DRAKE, DRAIK, DRAWK, v. a. To drench, S.
Bannatyne Poems.

Isl. dreck-ia, aquis obruo.

Draiks. In the draiks, in a slovenly disordered state, S. B.
Popular Ball.

DRAM, adj.
 1. Melancholy. S.B. drum, synon.
Douglas.
 2. Indifferent, S. B.
Ross.

Isl. draums, melancholicus.

DRAMOCK, DRAMMACH, DRUMMOCK, s.
 1. Meal and water mixed in a raw state, S.
Watson's Coll.

Gael. dramaig.

 2. Any thing boiled to the state of pulp, Ang.

To DRANT, DRUNT, v. n.
 1. To drawl, S.
 2. To pass in a tedious way, S.

Isl. dryn, drunde, mugire.

Ferguson.

Drant, Draunt, s.
 1. A drawling enunciation, S.
Ramsay.
 2. A slow and dull tune, S.

DRAP, s.
 1. A drop, S.
Chron. S. P.
 2. A small quantity of drink, S.
Ross.

To Drap, v. n. To drop, S.
S. Prov.

DRAP-DE-BERRY, s. Fine woollen cloth, made at Berry in France.
Watson's Coll.

To DRATCH, DRETCH, v. n. To linger, S. B.

Isl. dratt-a, segniter procedere.

To DRAUCHT, v. a. To draw the breath in long convulsive throbs, S.

Sw. drag-as, id.

DRAUCHT TRUMPET, War trumpet.
Douglas.

DRAUCHT, DRAUGHT, s.
 1. Lineament of the face, S.
Z. Boyd.
 2. An artful scheme, S.
Rutherford.

Teut. draght, vestigiae.

DRAVE, s.
 1. A drove of cattle, S.
 2. A shoal of fishes, S.
Statist. Acc.
 3. A crowd, S.

A. S. draf, agmen.

To DRAWL, v. n. To be slow in action, S.

Teut. drael-en, cunctari.

To DRE, DREE, DREY, v. a. To endure, S.
Barbour.

A. S. dreog-an, pati.

To DRE, DREY, v. n. To endure.

A. S. adreog-an, pati.

Barbour.

DREICH, DREEGH, adj.
 1. Slow, S.
Ross.
 2. Tedious, S.
Montgomerie.
 3. Denoting distance of situation.

Goth. drig, driug-r, prolixus.

Ritson.

Dreich, Dregh. On dreich, adv. At a slow pace.
Douglas.

DREDOUR, DRIDDER, s.
 1. Dread; drither, S. B.
Douglas.
 2. Apprehension, S. B.

A. S. draed, timor.

To Dridder, v. To dread, S. B.
Ross.

To DREEL, v. n. To move quickly, Ang.

Teut. drill-en, motitare.

Ross.

DREFYD, pret. Drave.
Wallace.

DREGY, DERGY, s.
 1. The funeral service.
Dunbar.
 2. The compotation of the funeral company, S.
Herd.

From the Lat. word dirige, frequently repeated in the office for the dead.

DREGGLE, s. A small drop of any liquid, S.

Su. G. dregel, saliva.

To DREGLE, DRAIGLE, v. n. To be tardy, S.
V. Dreich.

DREIK, s. Excrement.

Teut. dreck.

Gl. Sibb.

To DREIP, v. n. To distil in drops, S.
Sel. S. Ball.

A. S. dryp-an, Isl. dreip-a, id.

DREIRE, s. Leg. deire, hurt.
Fordun.

DRENE, s. Constant repetition.
Dunbar.

To DRESS, v. a.
 1. To treat well or ill.
Wyntown.
 2. To chastise, to drub, S.
 3. To iron linens, S. Dressing-iron, a smoothing iron, S.

DRESSE, s. Exhibition.
Godly Ball.

DRESSER, s. A kitchen table, S.

Teut. dressoor, Fr. dressoir, a sideboard.

DREVEL, s. A driveller.
Dunbar.

DREUILLYNG, DRIUYLLING, s. The vagaries of the mind, during unsound sleep.
Douglas.

Isl. draefl, drafl, sermo stultus; also apinae, fooleries.

DREW, s.
 1. A species of sea-weed that grows very long, Orkn.
Neill.
 2. Sea laces, Fucus filum, S.

Isl. driugr, prolixus.

DREW, s. A drop.
Palice Honour.

DRIB, DRIBBLE, s.
 1. A drop, S.
Ramsay.
 2. Drizzling rain, S.
Burns.

Belg. druppel, a drop.

DRY GOOSE, a handful of the finest meal, pressed very close together, dipt in water, and then roasted among the ashes of a kiln, S. A.

DRYCHYN, DRYCHYNG, s. Delay.
V. Dreich.
Wallace.

To DRIDDER, v. a.
V. Dredour.

To DRIDDLE, v. n.
 1. To spill from carelessness, Loth.
 2. To have a diarrhoea.
Montgomerie.

To DRIDDLE, v. n.
 1. To move slowly, S. B., same as druttle, q. v.
 2. To be diligent without progress, Border.

DRIDDLES, s. pl. The intestines of a slaughtered animal, Fife.

DRIDDLINS, s. pl. The knotted meal left after baking, S.

Germ. trodel, treidel, veteramenta.

DRIESHACH, s. The dross of a turf fire which glows when stirred, S. B.

DRIFLING, s. A small rain.
Baillie.

Isl. dreif-a, spargere.

DRIFT, s. Drove; as of cattle, Ayrs.

Teut. drifle, id.

To DRIFT, v. n. To delay.
R. Bruce.

To Drift, v. a. To put off.
Z. Boyd.

Drift, s. Procrastination.
R. Bruce.

DRIGHTIN, s. Lord.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. drichten, Alem. drohtin, id.

DRIMUCK, s. The same as Dramock.
Statist. Acc.

To DRING, v. a. To obtain with difficulty, S. B.
Henrysone.

Belg. dring-en, to urge, to press.

To DRING, v. n. To be slow, S. B.

Dring, adj. Dilatory, S. B.
Ross.

To DRING, DRINGE, v. n. To sound as a kettle before boiling.
Ramsay.

Dring, s. The noise of a kettle before it boils.

DRING, s.
 1. A servant.
Lyndsay.

Sw. dreng, id.

 2. A miser.
Bannatyne Poems.

DRINK-SILVER, s. A vale given to servants, S.
Rutherford.

DRYNT, pret. Drowned.
Douglas.

A. S. adrenct, mersus.

DRITHER, s. Dread.
V. Dredour.

To DRIZZEN, v. n.
 1. To low as a cow or ox, Ang.
 2. Applied to a sluggard groaning over his work, S. O.

Teut. druyssch-en, strepere.

To DRIZZLE, v. n. To walk slow; Gl. Shirr.

Isl. drosl-a, haesitanter progredi.

DRIZZLING, s. Slaver.
Gl. Shirr.

To DROB, v. a. To prick, Ang.

Isl. drep-a, perforare.

Drob, s. A thorn, a prickle, Perths.

DRODDUM, s. The breech.
Burns.

DROG, s. A buoy attached to the end of a harpoon line, S.

DROGARIES, pl. Drugs.
Bellenden.

Fr. drogueries, id.

DROICH, s. A dwarf, droch, S. B. dreich, Border.
Bannatyne Poems.

A. S. dweorh, Isl. droeg, homuncio.

Droichy, adj. Dwarfish, S.

DROILE, s. A slave; Isl. driole, id.
Z. Boyd.

DRONACH, s. Penalty, S. B.

Isl. drungi, molestia, onus.

DROTES, pl. Nobles.
Sir Gawan.

Su. G. drott, a lord.

DROUBLY, DRUBLIE, adj.
 1. Dark, troubled.
Dunbar.
 2. Muddy; applied to water.

Teut. droef, turbidus.
Henrysone.

DROUERY, DROURY, s.
 1. Illicit love.
Barbour.
 2. A love-token.
Douglas.
 3. A gift of any kind.
Douglas.

O. Fr. drurie, la vie joyeuse.

To DROUK, v. a. To drench, S.
Douglas.

DROUTH, s.
 1. Drought, S.
Chron. S. P.
 2. Thirst, S.
R. Bruce.

Drouthy, adj.
 1. Droughty, S.
 2. Thirsty, S.
Pennecuik.

DROW, s. A fainting fit, Ang.

A. S. throw-ian, pati.

DROW, s. A squall.
Mellvill's MS.

Gael. drog, motion of the sea.

DROWP, s. A feeble person.
Dunbar.

Isl. driup-a, tristari.

To DRUG, v. a. To pull forcibly, S.
Douglas.

Isl. thrug-a, premere, vim inferre.

Drug, s. A rough pull, S. B.
Ross.

DRUGGARE, adj. Drudging.
King's Quair.

Isl. droogur, tractor, bajulus.

DRUM, adj. Melancholy, S. B.
V. Dram.

DRUM, s. A ridge, S.
Statist. Acc.

Gael. druim, id.

Applied, S. B. to little hills, which rise as ridges above the level of the adjacent ground.

To DRUMBLE, v. n. To raise disturbance.
Ramsay.

Drumly, Drumbly, adj.
 1. Troubled.
Douglas.
 2. Muddy, S.
Douglas.
 3. Having a gloomy aspect, S.
Ramsay.
 4. Confused; as to mind.
Ferguson.
 5. Troubled; applied to the state of public matters, S.
Baillie.

To DRUNE, v. n. To low in a hollow or depressed tone, Ang.

Isl. dryn-ia, Sw. droen-a, mugire.

Drunt, s. A drawling enunciation, S.

DRUNT, s. Pet, sour humour, S.
Burns.

O. Fland. drint-en, tumescere.

DRUSH, s.
 1. Atoms, fragments.
Watson.
 2. The dross of peats, Banffs.

Moes. G. drauhsna, a fragment, from drius-an, to fall.

To DRUTTLE, v. n.
 1. To be slow in motion, S.
 2. To trifle about any thing, S.

Teut. dreutel-en, pumilionis passus facere.

DUALM, DWALM, DWAUM, s.
 1. A swoon, S.
Ross.
 2. A sudden fit of sickness, S.
Ritson.

Alem. dualm, caligo mentis stupore correptae.

Dualmyng, Dwauming, s.
 1. A Swoon.
Douglas.
 2. Metaph. the fall of evening, S. B.
Shirrefs.

DUB, s.
 1. A small pool of rain-water, S.
Douglas.
 2. A gutter, S.

Ir. dob, a gutter; Celt. dubh, canal.

DUBLAR, s.
V. Dibler.
Bannatyne Poems.

DUCHERY, s. Dukedom.
Bellenden.

DUCK, s. A leader.
V. Duke.

DUCK, s. Sail-cloth.
V. Doock.

DUD, s.
 1. A rag, S.
Ross.
Daily dud, the dish-clout, S. B.
 2. Duds, dudds, pl. clothing, especially of inferior quality, S.
Polwart.

Gael. dud, a rag, and dudach, ragged.  Isl. dude, indumentum levioris generis.

Duddy, adj. Ragged, S.
Ramsay.

DUDDROUN, s. Sloven, drab.
Dunbar.

Isl. dudr-a, to act in a slovenly manner.

DUDE, for do it, S.
Diallog.

To DUEL, DUELL, DWELL, v. n.
 1. To delay, to tarry.
Douglas.
 2. To continue in any state.
Barbour.
 3. To cease or rest.
Wallace.
 4. Dwelt behind, left behind.
Barbour.

Su. G. dwael-ias, id.  Isl. duel, moror.

Duelling, s. Delay, tarrying.
Barbour.

DUERGH, s. A dwarf.
V. Droich.
Gawan and Gol.

DUKE, DUCK, s. A general.
Evergreen.

DUKE, DUIK, s. A duck, S.
Bannatyne Poems.

DULCE, adj. Sweet; Lat. dulc-is.
Lyndsay.

DULDER, s. Any thing large, S. B.

To DULE, v. n. To grieve.
Dunbar.

Fr. doul-oir, Lat. dol-ere.

Dule, Dool, s. Grief, S.
Wyntoun.
To sing dool, to lament.
Gl. Shirr.

DULE, DOOL, s. The goal in a game.
Chr. Kirk.

Teut. doel, aggesta terra, in quam sagittarii jaculantur sagittas.

DULL, s. Hard of hearing, S.
Sir John Sinclair.

DULSE, adj. Dull, heavy, S. B.

Isl. dollsa, appendere ignavum.

DULSE, s. The fucus, a species of seaweed, S.
Martin.

Gael. duilliasg, Ir. dulisk, id.

DUM TAM, a bunch of clothes on a beggar's back, under his coat, S. B.

To DUMFOUNDER, v. a. To confuse, to stupify, S.

DUMBIE, s. pron. Dummie. One who is dumb, S.
Z. Boyd.

To DUMP, v. a. To strike with the feet, Ang.

Sw. domp-a, rudius palpare.

DUMPY, adj. Short and thick; also used as a s., S.

Isl. doomp, ancillula crassa.

DUMSCUM, s. A game of children, much the same as pallall, or the beds.

DUN, s. A hill, eminence, S.
Stat. Acc.

A. S. dun, mons; Gael. id. a fortified hill.

To DUNCH, v. a. To push or jog with the fist or elbow, S.

Teut. dons-en, pugno percutere.

DUNCH, s. One who is short and thick, S.

Dunchy, adj. Squat, S.

DUNDERHEAD, s. A blockhead, Loth.
V. Donnart.

DWMMYSMAN, s. A judge.
Wyntown.

DWN, pret. of the v. Do.
Wyntown.

DUNGEON of wit, One having a profound intellect, S.
Boswell.

DUNGERING, s. The dungeon of a castle.
S. P. Repr.

DUNIWASSAL, DUIN-WASSAL, s.
 1. A nobleman.
Colvil.
 2. A gentleman of secondary rank.
Garnet.
 3. Used to denote the lower class of farmers, generally in a contemptuous way, Ayrs.

Gael. duine, a man, and uasal, noble.

To DUNNER, DUNDER, v. n. To make a noise like thunder.
Gl. Sibb.

To DUNT, v. a. To strike so as to produce a dull hollow sound, S.
Popular Ball.

To Dunt out,
 1. To bring any business to a termination, S.
Ross.
 2. To come to a thorough explanation, after a variance, S.

Su. G. dunt, ictus.

To Dunt, v. n. To palpitate.
Ramsay.

Dunt, Dount, s.
 1. A stroke causing a flat and hollow sound, S.  O. E. id.
Peblis to the Play.
 2. Palpitation of the heart, S.
Ross.
 3. At a dunt, unexpectedly, Stirlings.

Isl. dunt, a stroke given to the back or breast, so as to produce a sound.

Dunting, s. Continued beating, causing a hollow sound, S.
Melvil.

DUNTER-GOOSE, s. The Eider duck.
Brand.

Su. G. dun, down, and taer-a, to gnaw, because it plucks the down from its breast.

DUNTY, s. A doxy.
Gl. Ramsay.

DUNZE.
V. Doyn.

DUR, DURE, s. Door.
Wyntown.

A. S. dure, id.

DURGY, adj. Thick, gross, Loth.

Isl. driug-r, densus.

DURK, s. A dagger, S.
Poems Buch. Dial.

Gael. durc, a poniard; Teut. dolck, sica.

To Durk, v. a.
 1. To stab with a dagger, S.
Cleland.
 2. To spoil, to mismanage, S.

To DURKEN, v. a. To affright.
Sir Gawan.

To DUSCH, v. n.
 1. To move with velocity.
Douglas.
 2. To twang.
Douglas.
 3. To dusch doun. To fall with noise, id.
Douglas.

Germ. dosen, strepitum edere; Isl. thus-a, tumultuose proruere.

Dusche, s.
 1. A fall; as including the crash made by it.
Douglas.
 2. A stroke, a blow.
V. Doyce.
Barbour.

Isl. thys, Alem. thuz, doz, fragor.

DUSCHET, DUSSIE, s. A musical instrument.
Poems 16th Cent.

DUSCHET, DUSSIE, s. An indorsement.
Leg. Bp. St Androis.

Fr. douss-er, to indorse.

To DUSH, v. a. To push as a ram, ox, &c. S.

Teut. does-en, pulsare cum impetu; Isl. dusk-a, verbera infligo.

DUST, s. A tumult.

Su. G. dyst, id.

DUST of a mill, what flies from a mill in grinding,

S. Teut. duyst, pollen.

DUST of lint, what flies from flax in dressing, S.

Teut. doest, lanugo lintei.

DUSTIE-FUTE, DUSTIFIT, s.
 1. A pedlar.
Skene.
 2. One who is not resident in a country.
Burr. Lawes.
 3. Used to denote revelry.
Godly Ball.

To DUTE, DUTT, v. n. To dose, S. B.

Belg. dutt-en, to set a-nodding.

Dut, s. A stupid person, S. B.

Dan. doede, stupidus; Belg. dutt-en, delirare.

DWABLE, DWEBLE, adj. Weak, flexible.

Su. G. dubbel, double.

Ross.

DWALM, DWAUM, s.
V. Dualm.

To DWANG, v. a.
 1. To oppress with labour, S. B.
 2. To bear, or draw, unequally, S. B.
 3. To harass by ill-humour, S. B.

Teut. dwingh-en, domare, arctare.

To Dwang, v. n. To toil, S. B.
Morison.

Dwang, s. A rough shake or throw, S. B.
Morison.

To Dwyne, v. n.
 1. To pine, S.
A. Nicol.
 2. To fade, applied to nature.
Ferguson.
 3. To dwindle, S.
Poems Buch. Dial.

Teut. dwyn-en, attenuare, extenuare.

To Dwyn, v. a. To cause to languish.
Montgomerie.

Dwyning, s. A decline, S.

Isl. dwinar, diminutio.



E

E, Ee, s. The eye, S.
Douglas.

EA, adj. One.
V. the letter A.

To EAND, v. n. To breathe.
V. Aynd, v.

EARLEATHER-PIN, s. An iron pin for fastening the chain by which a horse draws in a cart, Fife.

To EARM.
V. Yirm.

To EARN, v. n.
 1. To coagulate, S.
 2. To cause to coagulate, S.

Germ. ge-rinnen, Su. G. raenn-a, coagulare.

Earning, s. Rennet, S.

A. S. gerunning, id.

EARN-BLEATER, s. The snipe, S. B. earnbliter.
Ross.

EARNY-COULIGS, s. pl. Tumuli, Orkn.

Isl. ern, ancient, and kulle, tumulus, Su. G. summitas montis.

EASING, EASINGDRAP, s. The eaves of a house, S.

A. S. efese; Belg. oosdruyp, id.

To EASSIN, EISIN, v. a.
 1. To desire the bull, S.
 2. Applied to strong desire of any kind.
Ferguson.

Isl. yxna or oxna, vitula appetens taurum.

Eastning wort, Scabious, an herb, S. A.
Pennecuik.

EARN, s. The Eagle.
V. Ern.

EARTH, s. The act of earing, S. B.
Statist. Acc.

Sw. ard, aratio, from aer-ia, to ear.

EASTIE-WASTIE, s. An unstable person, Ang.; q. one who veers from east to west.

EASTLAND, adj. Belonging to the east.
Baillie.

EASTLIN, adj. Easterly, S.
Ramsay.

Eastlins, adv. Eastward, S.
Ross.

A. S. east-laeng, oriente tenus.

EASTILT, adv. Eastward, westlit, westward; pron. eassilt, wessilt, Loth.

A. S. east-daele, plaga orientalis.

EAT, s. The act of eating, S. B.

A. S. aet, Teut. aet, food.

EATIN BERRIES, Juniper berries, S. B.
V. Etnagh.

EBB, adj. Shallow, S.
Rutherford.

Ebbness, s. Shallowness.
Rutherford.

ECCLEGRASS, s. Butterwort or sheep-rot, Orkn.
Neill.

ECHER, ICKER, s. An ear of corn, S.

A. S. aecer, aechir, id.

Douglas.

ECHT, s. Ought.
Barbour.

EDROPPIT, part. pa. Dropsical.
Bellenden.

EE, s. Eye.
V. E.

Ee of the day, Noon, mid-day, S. B.

Ee-list, Eye-list, Eye-last, s.
 1. A deformity, an eye-sore.
R. Bruce.
 2. An offence.
Godscroft.
 3. A break in a page, S.
Gl. Sibb.

A. S. eag, oculus, and laest, defectus.

Ee-stick, Eistick, s. Something singular or surprising; q. that which causes the eye to stick or fix, S.
Ferguson.

Ee-sweet, Eye-sweet, adj. Acceptable, S.
Rutherford.

Ee-winkers, s. The eye-lashes, S.
Rutherford.

Een, Ene, pl. of Ee, Eyes, S.
Douglas.

EEBREK CRAP, The third crop after lea, S. B.

EEGHIE nor OGHIE. I can hear neither eeghie nor oghie, neither one thing nor another, Ang.
Ross.

Su. G. igh, or eighi, not.

EEKFOW, adj. Equal; also, just, Ang.

Su. G. ekt-a, Germ. eicht, justus.

Eeksie-peeksie, adj. Equal, Ang.

EEL. A nine-ee'd eel, a lamprey, S.

Su. G. neionoogon, Germ. neunauge, id.

Eel-backit, adj. Having a black line on the back, applied to a dun-coloured horse, S.

Eelpout, s. The viviparous Blenny, S.

EERIE, adj. Timorous.
V. Ery.

EFFECTUOUS, adj. Affectionate.

L. B. affectuos-us, id.

Douglas.

To EFFEIR, v. n.
 1. To become, to fit.
Chr. Kirk.
 2. To be proportional to.
Knox.

Effeir, s.
 1. What is becoming.
Maitland Poems.
 2. A property, quality.
Dunbar.

To EFFERE, EFFEIR, v. a.
 1. To fear.
Lyndsay.
 2. To affright.
Douglas.

A. S. afaer-an, terrere.

To Effeir, v. n. To fear.
Lyndsay.

Effray, Effraying, s. Terror.
Barbour.

Fr. effray-ir, to affright.

Effrayitly, adv. Under affright.
Barbour.

EFREST, Best; Isl. ypprist.
Houlate.

EFT, adv. After.

A. S. id.

Wallace.

Eft castel, Hinder part of the ship.
Douglas.

Efter, Eftir, prep. After.

A. S. eftyr, id.

Abp. Hamiltoun.

Eftir ane, adv. Uniformly, S.
Douglas.

Eftirhend, adv. Afterwards, S.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Su. G. efter, and haen, hence, dehinc, posthac.

Efterhend, prep. After. Id.

Eftremess, s. A dessert.
Barbour.

A. S. aefter and mess, a meal.

EFTSYIS, adv. Ofttimes, Rudd.
Douglas.

A. S. eft, iterum, and sithe, vice.

EGG-BED, s. The ovarium of a fowl, S.

EGGLAR, s. One who collects eggs for sale, S. A.

EY, A termination of the names of many places; signifying an island, also written ay, a, or ie.

Isl. ey, id.

EIDENT, adj. Diligent.
V. Ithand.

EIDER DOUN, Down of the eider duck.

Sw. eiderdun, id.

Pennant.

EYE-LIST, s. A flaw.
V. Ee-List.

EYEN, pl. Eyes.
V. Een.

EIFFEST, adv. Especially.
Barry.

Isl. efst-r, supremus.

EIK, pron. Each.
Douglas.

EIK, EKE, s. An addition, S.
Baillie.

EIK, s. Lineament used for greasing sheep, S. A.

To EILD, ELD, v. n. To wax old.

A. S. eald-ian, veterascere.

Bellenden.

Eild, Eld, s.
 1. Any particular period of life, S.
Barbour.
Euin eild, Equal in age.
Douglas.
 2. A generation.
Douglas.
 3. An era.
Wyntown.
 4. The advanced period of life.
Douglas.

A. S. yld, aetas, aevum.

Eild, adj. Old.

A. S. eald, id.

Douglas.

Eildit, part. pa. Aged.
Douglas.

Eildins, Yealings, s. pl. Equals in age.
Burns.

A. S. efen-eald, coaevus, inverted.

To EYNDILL, v. n. To be jealous of; eenil, Fife.
Maitland Poems.

Eyndling, Eyndland, part. pr. Jealous.
Semple.

EIR, s. Fear, Ang.
V. Ery.

EIRACK, s. A hen-pullet, S.
Statist. Acc.

Gael. eirag, id.  Germ. jahrig, one year old.

EYRE FALCONS, Leg.
Gyre.Houlate.

EITHER, adv. Or, Ang.
Knox.

Isl. eda, edr, seu.

EITH, EYTH, ETH, adj. Easy, S.

A. S. eath, facilis.

Barbour.
Eith is also used adverbially.
Ramsay.

Eithar, Ethar, comp.
Douglas.

Eithly, adv. Easily, S.

EYTTYN, ETTYN, ETIN, EATEN, s.
 1. A giant.
Complaynt S.
 2. Redeaten occurs as equivalent to canibal.

Isl. jautun, jotun.

Mellvill's MS.

EIZEL, AIZLE, ISIL, ISEL, s.
 1. A hot ember, S.
Burns.
 2. Wood reduced to the state of charcoal, S.
 3. In pl. metaph. for the ruins of a country desolated by war.
Douglas.

A. S. ysle, embers, Isl. eysa, carbones candentes sub cinere.

ELBOCK, ELBUCK, s. Elbow, S.
Ramsay.

A. S. elboga, Alem. elnboga, from A. S. eln, the arm, and boge, curvature.

Elbow-grease, s.
 1. Hard work with the arms, S.
 2. Brown rappee, Ang.

ELDARIS, ELDRYS, s. pl. Ancestors.
Barbour.

A. S. aldor, Su. G. aeldre, senior.

ELDER, s. Among Presbyterians, one ordained to the exercise of government without having authority to teach, S.
Buik of Discipline.

ELDERSCHIP, s.
 1. The ecclesiastical court, now called a Presbytery.
Buik of Discipline.
 2. The Kirk-session of a particular congregation, S.
Baillie.

A. S. ealdor-scipe, principatus.

ELDFADER, s.
 1. Grandfather.

A. S. eald fader, id.

Barbour.
 2. Father in law.
Douglas.

ELDIN, ELDING, s. Fuel of any kind, S.

A. S. aeled, Su. G. eld, fire.

Ferguson.

ELDING, s. Age.
V. Eild.
Maitland P.

ELDIS, adv. On all sides.
Douglas.

A. S. eallis, omnino.

ELDMODER, s. Mother in law.
Douglas.

A. S. ealde-moder, avia.

ELDNING, ELDURING, s. Jealousy.

A. S. ellnung, emulation.

Dunbar.

ELDREN, ELDERIN, adj. Elderly, S.
Ross.

Dan. aldrende; Isl. aldraen, senex.

ELEVEN-HOURS, s. A luncheon, S.

ELFMILL, s. The sound made by a wood-worm, viewed by the vulgar as preternatural, S. q. "fairy-mill."

ELFSHOT, s.
 1. The name vulgarly given to an arrow-head of flint, S.
Pennant.
 2. Disease, supposed to be produced by the stroke of an elf-arrow, S.
Glanville.

Norv. allskaadt, Dan. elleskud; i. e. elfshot.

Elf-shot, adj. Shot by fairies, S.
Ramsay.

ELIMOSINUS, adj. Merciful.
Burel.

ELYTE, s. One elected to a bishopric.

O. Fr. elite.

Wyntown.

ELLER, s. The Alder, a tree, S.
Lightfoot.

ELLIS, adv. Otherwise.

A. S. elles, id.

ELLIS, ELS, adv. Already, S.
Barbour.

ELRISCHE, ELRICHE, ELRAIGE, ELRICK, ALRISCH, ALRY, adj.
 1. Expressing relation to evil spirits.
Dunbar.
 2. Preternatural, as regarding sound, S.
Douglas.
 3. Hideous; respecting the appearance.
Douglas.
 4. Frightful, respecting place, S.
Burns.
 5. Uncouth; in relation to dress.
Bellenden.
 6. Surly, austere.
 7. Fretted; applied to a sore, Ang.

A. S. aelf, and ric, rich; q. abounding in elves.

ELS, ELSE, adv. Already.
V. Ellis.

ELSYN, ELSON, s. An awl, S.
Ramsay.

Teut. aelsene.

ELWAND, ELNWAND, s.
 1. An instrument for measuring, S.
Burr. Lawes.
 2. Orion's girdle, a constellation.
Douglas.

From eln and wand, a rod.

EMAILLE, s. Enamel.
V. Amaille.

EMBER GOOSE, A fowl which inhabits the seas about Orkney.
Sibbald.

EMERANT, s. Emerald.
King's Quair.

Emerant, Emerand, adj. Green.
Douglas.

EMMIS, IMMIS, adj.
 1. Variable, Ang.
 2. An immis nicht, a gloomy night, Banffs.

Su. G. ymsa, oemsa, to vary, alternare; Isl. yms, ymiss, varius.

To EMPASH, EMPESCHE, v. a. To hinder.

Fr. empescher.

Bellenden.

EMPRESS, EMPRISS, EMPRISE, ENPRESS, s. Enterprise.
Barbour.

Fr. empris.

ENACH, s. Satisfaction for a trespass.

Gael. enach, a ransom.

Reg. Maj.

ENARMED, part. pa. Armed.
Douglas.

Enarmoure, s. Armour.
Douglas.

ENBRODE, part. pa. Embroidered.
Id.

To ENBUSCH, v. a. To lay in ambush.

Fr. embusch-er, id. q. en bois.

Barbour.

Enbuschyt, s. Ambuscade.
Barbour.

Enbuschment, s.
 1. Ambush.
Barbour.
 2. Used in describing the testudo.
Douglas.

ENCHESOUN, s. Reason, cause.

O. Fr. acheson, occasion.

Barbour.

END, EYNDING, Breath.
V. Aynd.
Polwart.

Enday, s. Day of death.
Wyntown.

Su. G. and-as, to die.

Enfundeyng, s. Perhaps, asthma.
Barbour.

Su. G. andfaadd, cui spiritus praeclusus est.

ENDLANG, ENDLANGIS, adv. Along; S. enlang.
Barbour.

A. S. andlang, per; Su. G. aendalongs, id.

ENDORED, part. pa. Adorned; Fr. endoré; Lat. inaur-utus.

Sir Gawan.

ENE, pl. Eyes.
V. Een.

ENERLY.
V. Anerly.

ENEUCH, YNEWCH, s. Enough, S. pl. ynew.

A. S. genoh, satis.

Wallace.

ENFORCELY, adv. Forcibly.
Barbour.

ENGAIGNE, s. Indignation.
Barbour.

Fr. engain, choler.

To ENGREGE, v. a. To aggravate.

Fr. engreg-er, id.

Diallog.

To ENGREVE, ENGREWE, v. a. To vex.

Fr. grev-er, id.

Barbour.

ENKERLY, ENCRELY, INKIRLIE, adv.
 1. Inwardly.
Barbour.
 2. Ardently, keenly.
Douglas.

Fr. en coeur, q. in heart.

EMPRESOWNÉ, s. A prisoner.
Wyntown.

ENPRISE, s. Enterprise.
King's Quair.

ENSEINYIE, ENSENYE, ANSENYE, s.
 1. A mark, or badge.

Fr. enseigne.

Lyndsay.
 2. Ensign, or standard.
Knox.
 3. The word of war.
Barbour.
 4. A company of soldiers.
Knox.

ENSELYT, pret. Sealed.
Barbour.

ENTAILYEIT, part. pa. Formed.

Fr. entaill-er, to carve.

Palice of Hon.

ENTENTYVE, adj. Earnest, intent.

Fr. ententif.

Barbour.

Ententely, adv. Attentively.
Barbour.

ENTREMELLYS, s. pl. Skirmishes.
Barbour.

Fr. entremel-er, to intermingle.

ENTRES, ENTERES, s. Access, entry.
Bellenden.

ENTRES, s. Interest.
Acts Sedt.

EPISTIL, s. A harangue or discourse.
Dunbar.

ER, adv. Before.
V. Air.
Barbour.

Erar, Earer, comp.
 1. Sooner.
Gawan and Gol.
 2. Rather.
Wyntown.

Erast, superl. Soonest.
Wyntown.

ERD, ERDE, YERD, YERTH, s.
 1. The earth, S. pron. yird.
Wyntown.
 2. Ground, soil, S.

A. S. eard, Isl. jaurd, id., from Isl. aer-a, er-ia, to plough.

To Erd, Yerd, v. a.
 1. To inter a dead body, S. B.
Barbour.
 2. Denoting a less solemn interment.
Barbour.
 3. To cover with the soil, for concealment, S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Su. G. iord-as, sepeliri; Isl. iard-a.

Erd houses, Habitations formed under ground.

Isl. jard-hus, domus subterranea.

Erddyn, Yirden, s.
 1. An earthquake.
Wyntown.

A. S. eorth-dyn, terrae motus.

 2. Thunder, S. B.

ERE, EIR, s. Fear, dread; Ang.
V. Ery.

ERF, adj.
 1. Averse, reluctant, Loth. Fife.
 2. Reserved, distant, Loth.
V. Ergh.

To ERGH, ARGH, ERF, v. n.
 1. To hesitate, to feel reluctance, S.
Baillie.
 2. To be reluctant from timidity, S.
Ramsay.

A. S. earg-ian, torpescere pro timore.

Ergh, adj.
 1. Hesitating, scrupulous, S.
 2. Timorous, S. B.

Ergh, Erghing, s.
 1. Doubt, apprehension, S.
 2. Fear, timidity, S.

A. S. yrhth, id.

ERY, EIRY, EERIE, adj.
 1. Affected with fear, from whatever cause.
Douglas.
 2. Under the influence of fear, excited by wildness of situation.
Douglas.
 3. Denoting the feeling inspired by the dread of ghosts, S.
Ross.
 4. Causing fear of spirits, S.
Burns.

Belg. eer-en, vereri, Isl. ogr-a, terreo.

Eryness, Eiryness, s. Fear excited by the idea of an apparition, S.
Evergreen.

ERYSLAND, ERLSLAND, EUSLAND, s. A denomination of land, Orkn.
Barry.

Su. G. oeresland, the eighth part of a Markland.

ERLIS, s. Earnest.
V. Arles.

ERN, ERNE, EIRNE, EARN, s.
 1. The eagle, S. B.
Douglas.
 2. The osprey.
Houlate.

A. S. earn, Isl. aurn, ern, aquila.

ERNAND, part. pr. Running.

A. S. eorn-an, currere.

Maitland P.

ERN-FERN, s. The brittle fern, S. q. "the eagle-fern."

ERSE, adj. used as a s. The dialect of the Celtic spoken by the Highlanders of S. i. e. Irish.

ERTAND, part. pr. Perhaps, ingenious, from Airt, v. to aim.
Gawan and Gol.

ESCH, s. The ash, a tree.
Douglas.

Eschin, adj. Belonging to the ash.
Doug.

To ESCHAME, v. n. To be ashamed.
Douglas.

ESCHEL, ESCHEILL, s. A division of an army.
Barbour.

O. Fr. eschielle, a squadron.

To ESCHEVE, ESCHEW, v. a. To achieve.

Fr. achev-er.

Barbour.

ESCHEW, s. An achievement.
Barbour.

ESFUL, adj. Producing ease.
Wyntown.

ESK, s. A newt, S.
V. Ask.

To ESK, EESK, YESK, v. n. To hiccup, S. B.

A. S. gisc-ian, id.

Eskin, Eeskin, s. The hiccup, S. B.

A. S. geocsung, id.

ESPERANCE, s. Hope, Fr.
Bellenden.

ESPYE, s. A spy.

Fr. espie.

Douglas.

Espyell, s. A spy.
Knox.

ESPINEL, s. A sort of ruby. Fr.
Burel.

ESPOUENTABILL, adj. Dreadful.

O. Fr. espouventable.

Lyndsay.

ESS, s. Ace.
Bannatyne P.

ESSYS, pl. Advantages.

Fr. aise.

Wyntown.

ESSONYIE, s. Excuse offered for non-appearance in a court of law.

Fr. essoine, id.

Reg. Maj.

Essonyier, s. One who legally offers an excuse for the absence of another.
Reg. Maj.

ESTER, s. An oyster.
Lyndsay.

ESTLER, adj. Hewn.
V. Aislair.
Ramsay.

ETH, adj. Easy.
V. Eith.

ETHERINS, s. pl. The cross ropes of a thatched roof or stack, S. B.

A. S. ether, a covert, heather-ian, arcere.

ETHIK, ETICK, adj.
 1. Hectic.
Bellenden.
 2. Delicate, S. B.

Fr. etique, hectic.

ETIN, s. A giant.
V. Eyttyn.

ETION, s. Lineage, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Su. G. aett, ett, family.

ETNAGH BERRIES, Juniper berries, Ang.
Ross.

To ETTIL, ETTLE, ATTEL, v. a.
 1. To aim, to take aim, S.
Douglas.
 2. To make an attempt, S.
Ramsay.
 3. To propose, to design, S.
Douglas.
 4. To direct one's course.
Houlate.

Isl. aetla, destinare.

Ettle, Etling, s.
 1. A mark, S.
Ross.
 2. Aim, attempt, S.
Burns.
 3. Design.
Barbour.

To EVEN, v. a.
 1. To equal, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.
 2. To bring down to a certain level.
Rutherford.
 3. To talk of one as a match for another in marriage, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

EVENDOUN, adj.
 1. Perpendicular, S.
 2. Honest, downright, S.
 3. Denoting a very heavy fall of rain, S.

EVERICH, adj. Every; everichone, every one.
King's Quair.

A. S. aefre eac, id.

EUERILK, adj. Every.
Lyndsay.

A. S. aefre ealc, id.

Euirilkane, adj. Every one.
Barbour.

EUILL-DEDY, adj. Wicked.
Lyndsay.

A. S. yfel daeda, prava agens.

EVINLY, adj.
 1. Equal.
Douglas.
 2. Indifferent, impartial.
Wyntown.

A. S. efen-lic, aequalis, aequus.

EVIRLY, adv. Constantly, continually, S. B.

To EVITE, v. a. To avoid, Lat. evit-are.
Cleland.

EULCRUKE, s. Perhaps, oil-vessel.
Burrow Lawes.

EVLEIT, adj. Active.
V. Olight.

EUOUR, EVEYR, s. Ivory.
Douglas.

EWDEN-DRIFT, s. Drifted snow, Aberd.
Shirrefs.

EWDER, EWDRUCH, s. A disagreeable smell, S. B. Clydes.
Journal Lond.

Fr. odeur.

EWDER, s. Ablaze, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

EW-GOWAN, s. Common Daisy.

EWEST, adj. Contiguous.
Acts Ja. VI.

EWIN, adv. Straight, right.
Dunbar.

EWYNLY, adv. Equally.
Barbour.

To EXAME, v. a. To examine, S.
Diallog.

To EXCAMBIE, v. a. To exchange, S.

L. B. excamb-iare.

Excambion, s. Exchange, S.
Spotswood.

To EXEME, EXEEM, v. a. To exempt.
Skene.

EXPECTANT, s. A candidate for the ministry, not yet licensed to preach the gospel.
Acts Assembly.

To EXPISCATE, v. a. To fish out by inquiry, S.
Wodrow.

Lat. expisca-ri, id.

To EXPONE,
 1. To explain.
Baillie.

Lat. expon-ere.

 2. To expose to danger.
Knox.

To EXPREME, v. a. To express.
Doug.

EXPRES, adv. Altogether.
Douglas.

Fr. par exprés, expressly.

EXTRÉ, s. Axle-tree, S.
V. Ax-tree.
Douglas.

To EXTRAVAGE, v. n. To deviate in discourse.
V. Stravaig.
Fountainhall.



F

FÃ, FAE, s. Foe.

A. S. fa, id.

Douglas.

FA, v. and s.
V. Faw.

FABORIS, s. pl. Suburbs.

Fr. faux-bourg.

Wallace.

FABURDOUN, s. Counterpoint in music; Fr. faux-bourdon.

Burel.

FACHENIS, pl. Faulchions.
Douglas.

Fr. fauchon.

FACHT, Leg. flicht, flight.
Houlate.

FADDIS, s. pl. Boats.
Bellenden.

Gael. fada.

FADE, FEDE, adj. Appointed; A. S. fad-an, ordinare.
Sir Tristrem.

FADE, s. A company of hunters.
Doug.

Isl. veid-a, to hunt, Gael. fiadh, a deer.

To FADE, v. a. To fall short in.

Isl. fat-ast, deficit.

Wyntown.

FADER, FADYR, s. Father.
Barbour.

A. S. faeder, Isl. fader, id.

FADGE, s. A bundle of sticks, Dumfr.

Sw. fagg-a, onerare.

FADGE, FAGE, s.
 1. A large flat loaf or bannock.
Gl. Sibb.
 2. A flat wheaten loaf, Loth.
Ramsay.

Teut. wegghe, libum oblongum; Fr. fouace, a thick cake.

 3. A lusty and clumsy woman, S.
Ritson.

To FADLE, FAIDLE, v. n. To waddle, Ang.

FADOM, s. A fathom, S.

Isl. fadm-r.

FAGALD, s. Faggot.
Barbour.

FAY, s.
 1. Faith, O. Fr. fe.
Wyntown.
 2. Fidelity, allegiance.
Barbour.

To FAIK, v. a. To grasp.
Douglas.

Fland. fack-en, apprehendere.

To FAIK, v. a. To fold, S.
Burns.

Sw. veck, a fold.

Faik, s.
 1. A fold, S. B.
Bannatyne P.
 2. A plaid, Ang. Faikie, Aberd.
Journal Lond.

FAIK, s. A stratum of stone, Loth.

FAIK, s. The razor-bill, a bird.
Neill.

To FAIK, v. a.
 1. To lower the price of any commodity, Loth. Perths.
 2. To let go with impunity, Loth.

Su. G. falk-a, to cheapen.

To FAIK, FAICK, v. n. To fail, S. B.

Su. G. wik-a, cedere.

Ross.

To FAIK, v. n. To stop, S. B.
Ross.

FAIL, FALE, FEAL, s.
 1. Any grassy part of the surface of the ground.
Doug.
 2. A flat grassy clod cut from the sward, S.
Bellenden.

Su. G. wall, (pron. vall), sward.

Fail-dyke, s. A wall built of sods, S.
Minstrelsy Border.

To FAILE, v. n.
 1. To fail.
 2. To be in want of any thing.
Barbour.

Failyie, Faylyhé, s.
 1. Failure.
Act Sedt.
 2. Legal subjection to a penalty.
Spalding.
 3. Penalty in case of breach of bargain, S.

To FAYND, FAND, v. a.
 1. To tempt.
Wyntown.
 2. To put to trial.
Sir Tristrem.
 3. To endeavour.
Barbour.

A. S. fand-ian, tentare.

To FAYND, v. n. To shift.
V. Fend.
Wallace.

FAYNDING, s. Perhaps, guile.
Barbour.

FAINY, adv. Not understood.
Houlate.

FAINTICE, s. Dissembling.
Barbour.

Fr. faintise.

FAIPLE, s. To hang the faiple, to be chopfallen, S.
A. Scott.

FAIR, adj. Calm, Orkney.

FAIR, FERE, FEYR, s. Appearance.

A. S. feorh, vultus.

Douglas.

FAIR, FAYR, FAR, s.
 1. Solemn preparation.
Barbour.
 2. Funeral solemnity.
Gawan and Gol.

Germ. feyr-en, to celebrate.

FAIR, s. Affair.
Priests of Peblis.

FAYR, adj. Proper.
Barbour.

Moes. G. fagr, idoneus.

FAIRD, s.
 1. Course.
Complaynt S.
 2. Expedition, enterprise.
Calderwood.

FAIRDED, part. pr. Painted.
V. Fard, v.

FAIRDING, s. Violent blowing.
Burel.

FAYRE, FARE, s. Course.
Wyntown.

Isl. far, iter.

FAIR-FARAND.
V. Farand.

FAIRFASSINT, adj. Having great semblance of discretion, Ang.

FAIR-FUIR-DAYS.
V. Fure-dayis.

FAIRHEID, s. Beauty.
Dunbar.

FAIRIN, FARNE, part. pa. Fared.
Barbour.

FAIRY-HILLOCKS, pl. Verdant knolls, denominated from the vulgar idea that these were anciently inhabited by the fairies, or that they used to dance there, S.

To FAIRLY.
V. Ferly, v.

FAIRNTICKL'D, adj. Freckled.

FAIT, s. To lose fait of, to lose one's good opinion of, S.

Fr. faire fÃte de, to joy in.

To FAYT, v. a. Perhaps, frame.
Sir Tristrem.

To FAIZLE, v. a. To flatter, S. B.

Su. G. fios-a, id.

FALD, FAULD, s.
 1. A sheep-fold, S.
Ross.
 2. An inclosure of any kind.
Douglas.

A. S.  Isl. fald, septum animalium.

To Fald, Fauld, v. a. To inclose in a fold, S.

Sw. faella, id.

To FALD, v. n. To bow, S.
Garden.

A. S. feald-an, plicare.

To FALE, v. n. To happen.
Wyntown.

FALK, FAUK, s. The Razor-bill.
Martin.

To FALL, v. n.
 1. To fall to, as one's portion, pron. faw, S.
Peblis to the Play.
 2. To be one's turn. It fawis me now, S.

To Fall by, v. n. To be lost, S.
Rutherford.

To FALL with child, to become pregnant, S.

FALL, (pron. faw) s. A measure six ells square, S.
Skene.

Su. G. fale, pertica, a perch.

FALL, FAW, s. A trap, S.
Evergreen.

Germ. falle, Su. G. falla, decipula.

FALLBRIG, s. A bridge used in a siege, which the besiegers let fall on the walls, that they might enter by it.
Barbour.

FALLEN STARS, a gelatinous plant, found in pastures, &c. after rain, S.

Sea fallen stars, Sea lungs, An animal thrown on the sea-shore, S.

To FALLOW, v. a. To follow, S.
Douglas.

FALOW, FALLOW, s. Fellow.
Wyntown.

To Fallow, v. a. To equal.
Dunbar.

FALSAR, FALSARIE, s. A falsifier.
Acts Marie.

FALSED, FALSETTE, s.
 1. Falsehood.
Dunbar.
 2. A forgery.

O. Fr. faulsete.

Acts Mar.

FALT, FAUTE, FAWT, s. Want.

O. Fr. faute.

Barbour.

FAME, FAIM, FEIM, s.
 1. Foam, S.
Douglas.
 2. Passion, S. B.

A. S. fam, faem, spuma.

To Fame, v. n. To be in a rage, S.

FAMEN, pl. Foes.
Wallace.

A. S. fah-mon, foe-man.

FAMYLE, FAMELL, s. Family, race.

Fr. famille.

Douglas.

FAMOUS, adj. Of good character.

Fr. fameux, of much credit.

Wodrow.

To FAND, v. a. To try.
V. Faynd.

FAND, pret. v. Found, S.
Hudson.

To FANE, v. a. To protect.
Dunbar.

FANE, In fane, fondly.
Gawan and Gol.

FANG, s.
 1. Capture.
Wallace.
 2. What is seized or carried off, Ang.
Morison.
With the fang, having in possession, LL. S.
 3. In pl., claws or talons, S.
 4. The bend of a rope.
Gl. Sibb.

A. S. fang, Teut. vanghe, captura, captus.

To FANK, FANKLE, v. a. To entangle, especially by knots, S.
Henrysone.

Teut. vanck, tendicula.

FANNOUN, FANNOWNE, s. A linen handkerchief carried on the priest's arm at mass.

Fr. fanon.

Wyntown.

To FANTISIE, v. a. To regard with affection.

Fr. fantas-ier.

G. Buchanan.

Fantise, s. Vain appearance.
K. Quair.

FANTON, s. Swoon.
Palice of Hon.

FANTOWN, adj. Fantastic.
Wyntown.

FAR, s. Pompous preparation.
V. Fair.

FAR, s. Appearance.
V. Fair.
Barbour.

FAR, FARE, FAYR, s. Expedition.
Barbour.

FARAND, FARRAND, adj. Seeming.
Douglas.

Auld-farand, adj. Sagacious, S.

Fair-farand, adj.
 1. Having a goodly appearance.
S. P. Repr.
 2. Having a fair carriage.
Houlate.
 3. Having a specious appearance, S.

Euil-farand, adj. Unseemly.
Douglas.

Foul-farren, adj. Having a bad appearance.
Kelly.

Weill-farand, adj.
 1. Having a goodly appearance.
Barbour.
 2. Handsome.
Wallace.

Su. G. far-a, agere; Teut. vaer-en, gerere se.

FARAND, part. pr. Travelling.
Barbour.

Farandman, s. A traveller.
Skene.

A. S. farende, itinerant.

FARAR, compar. Better.
Gawan and Gol.

FARCOST, s. A trading vessel.
Stat. Acc.

Su.G. farkost, any instrument of travelling.

FARAR, s. A traveller.
Douglas.

To FARD, FAIRD, v. a.
 1. To paint.
Z. Boyd.
 2. To embellish.
Compl. S.

Fr. fard-er, id. fard, paint.

Fard, s. Paint.
Z. Boyd.

FARD, adj. Weill fard, well favoured.
Lyndsay.

FARD, FARDE, FAIRD, s.
 1. Course.
Douglas.
 2. Force, ardour.
Bellenden.
 3. To make a faird, to make a bustle.

Su. G. faerd, cursus, iter.

Ramsay.

FARDER, adj. Further, S.
R. Bruce.

FARDILLIS, s. pl. Shivers.
Gawan and Gol.

Teut. vier-deel, quadra.

FAREFOLKIS, s. pl. Fairies; fair-folk, Banffs.
Douglas.

Q. fair folk, or faring folk.

FARY, FARIE, s.
 1. Bustle, tumult.
Dunbar.
 2. Confusion, consternation.
V. Fiery.
Douglas.

FARING, s. Leading of an army.
Barbour.

Isl. faer-a, Su. G. foer-a, ducere, ducem esse.

FARLAND, adj. Coming from a distant country.
Maitland P.

A. S. feorlen, feorlend, longinquus.

FARLE, FARTHEL, FERLE, s. Properly, the fourth part of a thin cake, whether of flour or oatmeal; but now used often for a third, S.
Wodrow.

Teut. vier-deel; A. S. feorth dael, quarta pars.

FARRACH, s. Force, vigour, S. B.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Isl. faer, validus; Gael. farrach, force.

FARSY, adj. Having the farcy.
Dunbar.

Fr. farcin.

FARTIGAL, s. A fardingale.

Fr. vertugale, id.

Maitland P.

FAS, s. Hair.

A. S. feax, id.

Douglas.

To FASCH, FASH, v. a.
 1. To trouble, applied to the body, S.
Baillie.
 2. Denoting what pains the mind.
Baillie.
 3. To molest, in a general sense, S.
Evergreen.
To fash one's thumb, to give one's self trouble, S.
Ramsay.

To Fasch, v. n.
 1. To take trouble, S.
 2. To be weary of, S.
Chron. S. P.
 3. To intermeddle, so as to subject one's self to trouble, S.

Fr. se fach-er, to grieve; Su. G. faas widen, tangere aliquem, to fash with, S.

Fasch, Fash, s.
 1. Trouble, S.
Burns.
 2. Pains taken about any thing, S.
 3. Denoting a troublesome person, S.

Fascheous, Fashious, adj. Troublesome.

Fr. facheux, facheuse, id.

Baillie.

Facherie, Fr. Fashrie, s. Trouble, S.
Acts Ja. VI.

FASSE, s. A hair.
S. P. Repr.

FASSON, s. Fashion, S. B. fassin.
Complaynt S.

FASTAN REID DEARE, Deer of a deep red colour.
Acts Ja. VI.

FASTRINGIS-EWYN, s. The evening preceding the first day of the Fast of Lent. Fasterns-een, S.
Barbour.

Belg. Vastenavond, id.

FATHERBETTER, adj. Surpassing one's father, S. B.
Baillie.

Isl. faudrbetringr, id.

FATHER-BROTHER, s. A paternal uncle, S.
Skene.

Father-sister, s. A paternal aunt.
Id.

FATT'RILS, s. pl. Folds or puckerings, S. O.
Burns.

O. Fr. fatraille, trumpery.

FAUCH, FAW, FEWE, adj. Pale red, fallow; dun, Aberd.
Douglas.

A. S. fah, fealg, fealh, helvus.

To FAUCH, FAUGH, v. a.
 1. To fallow ground, S.
Statist. Acc.
 2. To beat. He faught him well, S. B.
Gl. Shirr.

Isl. faag-a, Su. G. faei-a, purgare.

Fauch, Faugh, adj. Fallow, not sowed, S.

Fauch, Faugh, s.
 1. A single furrow, from lea, Ang.
 2. The land thus managed, S. B.
Statist. Acc.
 3. Applied to the tearing of character, Ang.

FAUCHT, pret. Fought.
V. Fecht.

FAUTE, FAWT.
V. Falt.

FAUCUMTULIES, s. pl. Perquisites due by the tenant to the proprietor, Ang.

FAVELLIS, pl. Perhaps, savours.
K. Hart.

FAULTOUR, s. A transgressor.
Lyndsay.

FAUSE-HOUSE, s. A vacancy in a stack, for preserving corns, q. false house.
Burns.

FAW, adj. Pale red.
V. Fauch.

Faw, adj. Of diverse colours.
Gawan and Gol.

A. S. fag, fah, versicolor.

To FAW, FÃ, v. a.
 1. To obtain.
Burns.
 2. To have as one's lot, S.
Popular Ball.

Faw, , s.
 1. Share, S.
Ross.
 2. Lot, chance, S.
Burns.

FAW, FÃ, s. A fall, S.

To Shak a Fá, s.
 1. To wrestle, S.
Ross.
 2. To strain every nerve, S. B.
Baillie.

Faw-cap, s. A stuffed cap for guarding a child's head from the bad effects of a fall, S. B.

FAW, s. A trap.
V. Fall.

FAWELY, adv. Few in number.
Wallace.

FAX, s. Face, visage.
Douglas.

Isl. fas, conspectus, gestus.

FAZART, adj. Dastardly.
Kennedy.

Su. G. fasar, horreo.

Fazart, s. A dastard.
Montgomerie.

FE, FEE, FEY, FIE, s.
 1. Cattle.
Barbour.
 2. Small cattle, sheep or goats.
Douglas.
 3. Possessions, in general.
Barbour.
 4. Money.
Wyntown.
 5. Wages, S.
Statist. Acc.
 6. Hereditary property in land.
Wyntown.
 7. Hereditary succession.
Barbour.
 8. Absolute property, as distinguished from liferent, LL. S.
Skene.

Isl. fe, Su. G. fae, A. S. feo, pecus, pecunia.

Fear, Fiar, s.
 1. One to whom property belongs in reversion, S.
 2. Connected with the term conjunct, a liferenter, S.
Skene.

FEALE, adj. Faithful, loyal, O. Fr. feal.
Bannatyne Poems.

FEATHER CLING, A disease of black cattle, S.
Ess. Highl. Soc.

To FEBLE, v. n. To become weak.
Barbour.

To Feblis, v. a. To enfeeble.

Fr. foiblesse, weakness.

Febling, s. Weakness.
Douglas.

To FECHT, v. a.
 1. To fight; pret. faucht, fawcht.
Wyntown.

A. S. feaht-an, Germ. fecht-an, id.

 2. To toil, S.
Burns.

Fecht, Facht, Faught, s.
 1. Fight, S.
Douglas.
 2. Struggle, of whatever kind, S.
Burns.

Fechtar, s. One engaged in fight, S.

A. S. feohtere, pugnator.

Wallace.

FEGHIE-LEGHIE, adj. A contemptuous term, conjoining the ideas of insipidity, inactivity, and diminutive size, Aberd.

FECK, FEK, s.
 1. A term denoting, both space and quantity or number, S.
Dunbar.
 2. The greatest part, S.
Wallace.
 3. Of feck, of value.
Montgomerie.

A. S. faec, space, or Fr. effect.

Feckful, Feckfow, adj.
 1. Wealthy, S. Feckfow-like having the appearance of wealth, S.
 2. Possessing bodily ability, S.
Hamilton.
 3. Powerful.
Ramsay.

Fecky, adj. Gaudy, S. B.
Ross.

Feckless, adj.
 1. Weak, applied to the body, S.
Ross.
 2. Feeble in mind.
Polwart.
 3. Spiritless, Ang.

Feckly, Fectlie, adv.
 1. Partly, S.
Watson.
 2. Mostly, S.
Ross.
Fecklessness, s. Feebleness, S.
Rutherford.

FECKET, s. Under-waistcoat, S.
Burns.

FEDDERAME, FEDREM, s. pl. Wings.
Douglas.

A. S. faether-ham, a dress of feathers.

To FEDE, v. a. To nurture.
Sir Trist.

A. S. fed-an, educare; Su. G. foed-a, alere.

To FEE, FIE, v. a. To hire, S.
V. Fe.
Knox.

FEEDING STORM, One that is on the increase, S.
Baillie.

To FEEL, v. a. To smell, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

FEENICHIN, adj. Foppish, Fife.

FEER for FEER, Every way equal, S. B.
V. Fere, companion.

FEERICHIN, adj. Bustling, S. B.
V. Fiery.

FEERIE, adj. Clever.
V. Fery.

FEETH, FEITH, s. A net, fixed and stretching into the bed of a river, Aberd.
Statist. Acc.

Moes. G. fatha, sepes; Dan. vod, a net.

To FEEZE, v. a. To twist, S. A.
Douglas.

To Feeze about,
 1. To turn round, S.
 2. To hang off and on, S. B.
Skinner.

Belg. vyz-en, id.

To Feeze on, v. a. To screw, S.

To Feeze aff, v. a. To unskrew, S.

To Feeze up, v. a.
 1. To flatter, S.

Su. G. fias-a, id.

 2. To work up into a passion, S.

FEY, FEE, FIE, adj.
 1. On the verge of death, S.
Wallace.
 2. Unfortunate, unhappy.
Douglas.
 3. A fey puckle, a grain of corn, that has lost its substance, S. B.

Isl. feig-r, Su. G. feg, A. S. faege, moribundus, morti appropinquans, Belg. veeg, Fr. fée, fatal.

Feydom, s. The state of being near death, or that conduct which is supposed to indicate it, S.

FEY, s.
 1. A fief, held of a superior.
Barbour.
 2. A kingdom; improperly.
Wyntown.

FEY, s. A foe.
V. Fa.
Maitland Poems.

FEID, FEDE, s. Enmity; a quarrel, S.
Wallace.

Isl. faide, fed, Su. G. fegd, A. S. faehth, E. fewd.

Feidom, s. Enmity.
Evergreen.

FEIGH, FEECH, interj. Fy, S.
Ramsay.

Alem. fig-en, A. S. fi-an, odisse.

FEYK, s. Restlessness, proceeding from nervous affection, the fidgets.
V. Fyke.
Polwart.

FEIL, FEILE, FEILL, FELE, adj. Many.
Barbour.

Isl. fiol. pluralitas; A. S. feala, fela, many.

Fell, Fiel, adv. Denoting degree, S. as, fell weill.
Burns.

To FEIL, v. a. To understand.
Wallace.

Feil, Feille, s. Knowledge.
Dunbar.

FEIM, s. Foam.
V. Fame.

FEIR, s. Demeanour.
Bannatyne P.

Feir, Feare of Were, a warlike expedition.
Dunbar.

A. S. far-an, proficisci, fare, expeditio.

FEYR. In feyr, in company.
V. Fere.

FEYRD, fourth.
V. Ferd.

FEIRIS, belongs.
Houlate.

FEKIT, FYKIT, Troubled.
Wallace.

FELCOUTH. L. selcouth, strange.
Wallace.

To FELL, v. a. To kill, S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

To FELL, v. n. To befal.
Ross.

FELL, adj.
 1. Hot, biting, S.
Burns.
 2. Singular, strange, S.
 3. Clever, mettlesome, S.
Keith.
 4. Acute, transferred to mind, S.

To FELL, FELL OFF, v. a. To let out a net from a boat, S. B.
Law Case.

Su. G. faell-a, dejicere, demittere.

FELL, s. A rocky hill, S.
Wyntown.

Su. G. fiaell, a ridge or chain of mountains.

FELL-BLOOM, s. Yellow clover, S.

FELL SYIS, adv. Often.
Barbour.

FELLIN, s. A disease of cattle, S.

FELOUN, FELLOUN, adj.
 1. Fierce.
Barbour.
 2. Violent, dreadful.
Douglas.
 3. Denoting any thing extreme.

Fr. felon, fellon, fell, cruel.

Wallace.

Felony, Felny, s.
 1. Cruelty.
Barbour.
 2. Wrath, fierceness.
Wyntown.

FELT, s. Creeping wheat-grass, S.
Statist. Acc.

FELT, s. Perhaps the same with fellin.
Watson.

To FELTER, v. a. To entangle, S. B.

Fr. feultrer, to cover with felt.

Ross.

FELT GRAVEL, the sandy gravel.
Spotswood.

FELTIFARE, s. The red shank, S.
Gl. Complaynt.

FEN, s. Mud, filth. A. S. fenn.
Douglas.

A. S. fenn, lutum, sordes, Moes. G. fani, lutum.  Lat. foen-um.

To FEN.
V. Fend, v. 2.

To FEND, v. a. To tempt.
V. Faynd.
Barbour.

To FEND, FENDE, v. a.
 1. To defend, S. Fr. de-fend-re, id.
Wallace.
 2. To support.
Minstr. Bord.
 3. To provide for one's self.
Rutherford.

To FEND, FEN, v. n.
 1. To shift, S.
Chron. S. P.
 2. To fare in general, S.

Fend, Fen, s. The shift one makes, S.
Douglas.

Fendie, adj. Good at making shift, S.
Sir J. Sinclair.

FENESTER, s. A window.
Douglas.

FENT, s. An opening in a sleeve, shirt, coat, &c. S.

Fr. fente, id.

FER, s. Preparation.
V. Fayr.
Barbour.

FER, adv. Far.
Douglas.

FERCOST, s. A bark.
V. Farcost.
Skene.

FERD, FEIRD, FEYRD, adj. Fourth.

Su. G. fiaerde, Isl. fiorda, id.

Douglas.

FERD, s. Force.
V. Faird.
Baillie.

FERDE, s. An army.
Sir Gawan.

A. S. faerd, id.

FERDELY, adv. Perh. actively.
Wallace.

FERDER, adv. Farther.
Douglas.

FERDY, FEIRDY, adj. Strong, active, S.
Poems Buchan Dial.

Su. G. faerdig, paratus.

FERDLY, adv. Fearfully; Bord.
Wallace.

FERE, adj. Fierce, Lat. ferus.
K. Quair.

FERE, s. Appearance, shew.
V. Fair.

FERE, FEER, s. A companion.

A. S. ge-fera, socius.

Barbour.
In fere, together.
Gawan and Gol.
Yfere, yferis, the same.
Douglas.

FERE, FER, adj. Entire.
Hale and fer, whole and entire, S.
Barbour.

Isl. faer, Su. G. foer, validus.

FERE of WEIR.
V. Feir.

FERETERE, s. A bier.
Douglas.

FERY, FEIRIE, FEERIE, adj. Vigorous, active, S.
Douglas.

Germ. ferig, expeditus, alacer.

Ferilie, Feerelie, adv. Cleverly, S.
Lyndsay.

FERIAT, adj. Feriat times, holidays.
Acts Sedt.

Lat. feriati dies; feriae, holidays.

FERIE-FARIE, s. Bustle.
V. Fary.

FERIS, v. n. Becomes.
V. Afferis.
Douglas.

FERYS, s. pl. Marks.
V. Fair.
Douglas.

FERYT, FERRYIT, pret. v. Farrowed.

Sw. faerria, porcellos parere.

Barbour.

FERYT, pret. v. Waxed.
Wallace.

FERITIE, s. Violence.
Bp. Forbes.

FERLIE, FERELY, FARLIE, s. A wonder, S.
Douglas.

A. S. faerlic, ferlic, repentinus; also, horrendus.

To Ferly, v. n. To wonder.
Douglas.

Ferlyfull, adj. Surprising.
Barbour.

FERLYST, L. Terlyst.
Wallace.

To FERME, v. a. To make firm.
Doug.

To FERME, v. a. To shut up.

Fr. ferm-er.

Douglas.

FERME, s. Rent, Fr.
Acts Ja. VI.

Fermorer, s. A farmer. L. B. firmar-ius.
Knox.

FERN, FEARN, s. Prepared gut. S. tharm, E.
Gl. Sibb.

FERNITICKLES, s. pl. Freckles, S.

Dan. fregne, id.

Fernitickled, Fairntickl'd, adj. Freckled, S.
Ritson.

FERNYEAR, FARNE-YEIR, s. The preceding year, S.
L. Hailes.

A. S. faren, past; or Moes. G. fairni, old.

Fernyear's Tale, a fabrication.
Sir Egeir.
S. fernyears news, any intelligence that has been known long ago.

FERRARIS, s. pl. Barell ferraris, casks for carrying liquids.
Barbour.

Fr. ferriére, a large leathern bottle.

FERRY COW, a cow that is not with calf, S.

Belg. vare koe, a cow that yields no more milk.

FERRYAR, FERREAR, s. A ferryman.
Acts Ja. I.
Douglas.

FERS. On fers. Perforce.
Henrysone.

FERSIE, s. The farcy, S.
Ferguson.

FERTER-LIKE, adj. Appearing ready for the bier or coffin, Aberd.
V. Fertour.
Poems Buchan Dial.

FERTOUR, FERTOR, s. A little chest.
Bellenden.

L. B. feretrum, a sarcophagus; whence O. Fr. fiertre, a chest in which reliques of saints were kept.

To FEST, v. a.
 1. To fix.
Gawan and Gol.

Su. G. faesta, to fasten.

 2. To confirm, by promise or oath.
Wallace.

To Fessin, v. a. To fasten.
Abp. Hamiltoun.

Festnyng, s. Confirmation.
Wyntown.

A. S. faestnung, id.

To FETYL, v. n. To join closely.

Su. G. faetil, ligamen.

Wyntown.

FETTIL, FETTLE, s. Energy, power, S. B.
Ross.

To FETTLE, v. a. To tie up, S.

FETTLE, adj.
 1. Neat, tight, S. B.
 2. Low in stature, but well-knit, S. B.

FETOUS, adj. Neat, trim.
Ruddiman.

Fetusly, adv. Featly.
Douglas.

To FEUCH, FEUGH, s. To take a whiff, S. B.
Journal Lond.

Isl. fiuk-a, vento agitari.

Feuch, s. A whiff, S. B.

FEUCH, s. A sounding blow, S. B.
Gl. Shirr.

FEVERFOULLIE, s. Feverfew, S.
Featherwheelie, S. B.

FEVER-LARGIE, s. Expl. Two stomachs to eat, and one to work.

FEU, FEW, s. A possession held on payment of a certain yearly rent. The mode of possession is also called few-ferme, the rent few-dutie, or few-maill, S.

A. S. feo, pecunia.

Acts Ja. VI.

Feuar, Fewar, s. One who holds lands in feu, S.

FEURE, s. Furrow.
V. Fur.

FEWE, adj. Fallow.
V. Fauch.

FEWLUME, s. A sparrow hawk.
Doug.

FEWS, FOUETS, s. pl. Houseleek.

FEWTÉ, s. Fealty. Fr. feauté.
Barbour.

To FEWTER, FUTER, v. a. To lock together.
Douglas.

Isl. fiaetr-a, compedibus constringere.

FEWTIR, s. Rage.
Wallace.

Isl. fudra, efflagro.

FIAL, FIALL, s.
 1. One who receives wages.
Spalding.
 2. A vassal.

O. Fr. feal, id.

Knox.

FIARS, s. pl. The prices of grain legally fixed for the year, S.

Fr. feur, estimatio venalium; or Isl. fiar, fear, the genit. of fe, fie, pecunia, opes.

FICHE, s. A fish.
Burel.

FICHYT, part. pa. Fixed.
Barbour.

FYCHYT, pret. Fetched.
Wyntown.

To FICKLE, v. a. To puzzle, Loth.
Wall.

A. S. ficol, versipellis, Su. G. vickla, complicare, in-vekla, to puzzle.

Fickly, adj. Puzzling, Loth.

FIDDER, s. A multitude.
V. Fudder.
Burel.

To FIDDLE, v. n. To trifle, though apparently busy, S.

Isl. fitl-a, leviter attingere.

FYDRING, s. Confederation.
Burel.

FIE, s. Sheep.
V. Fe.

FIEL, Burns.
V. Feil, adj.

FIER, s. Sound.
V. Fere.
A. Douglas.

FIERCELINGS, adj. Violent, S. B.
Ross.

Fiercelings, adv. Violently, S. B.
Ross.

FIERY, s.
 1. Bustle, confusion, S.
 2. Rage, pron. fieroch, furoch, Perths.

Su. G. fir-a, to celebrate.

Fiery-fary, s.
 1. Bustle, S.
Lyndsay.
 2. Shew, pretended bustle.
Baillie.

FIESE WILK, Striated whelk.
V. Feeze.
Sibbald.

FIFT, Houlate. L. in fist.